Amar Bose

Today, Bose Corporation sales are more than $350 million a year.

While its main operation is located in Framingham, Massachusetts. Dr. Amar Bose believes that "man is a 100-cylinder engine running on only one cylinder.

While that may be true for many, this human dynamo has been cranked up and running at full blast since the age of 13 when his first entrepreneurial venture was undertaken. While he had studied violin, Bose was more interested in radios. World War II was raging, and those with the technical expertise to repair radios were doing so for the military. Young Amar, who was already building his own radios, saw the need for repair work, learned how to fix radios, and built a radio service business that grew to be one of the largest in Philadelphia. So successful was he that Bose was given permission by his father to stay out of school on Fridays to tend to his repair business - as long as he maintained his good grades.

Bose entered M.I.T. as a freshman in 1947 and never left. In 1956 he earned his doctorate in science and joined the M.I.T. faculty, a position he holds to this day.

Shortly after he began teaching, Dr. Bose decided to reward himself with a "hi-fi" system. Selecting the "best" components, he built his system only to find that the sound it produced was disappointing. The concept for Bose Corporation was born.

Armed with volumes of psychoacoustic research and the grim determination to succeed, the company was launched in 1964 with one paid employee. Today, Bose Corporation sales are more than $350 million a year. While its main operation is located in Framingham, Massachusetts, Bose also has production facilities in New Hampshire, Michigan, Canada, Ireland, Mexico, and Australia, as well as a number of subsidiaries in Europe and the Far East.

The story of Professor Bose is the story of a brilliant man unafraid to take risks. "If you take a risk," he says, "you either go down or you are way ahead. I think a certain amount of that is absolutely necessary if you want to do exciting things." One of the major testimonials to the company's quality is that Bose loudspeakers are the number one sellers in Japan, beating all other competition in a country that is known for its electronics genius. But perhaps radio commentator Paul Harvey has said it best: "Amar Bose is the Thomas Edison of our time. He is to acoustical science what Edison was to electricity."