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​​​News​ and Events

FALL 2016

The Empty Space Theater (TEST) Presents Dead Man's Cell Phone

Dead Man's Cell Phone by Sarah Ruhl TEST.jpg
Directed by Professor Beth Wynstra 
October 28-29 and November 4-5 at 7:30 PM ​
October 30 at 2:00 PM
at the Sorenson Black Box Theater ​​ 

Originally produced on Broadway in 2007, this compelling and often times unnerving play demonstrates the ways we make (and don't make) connections to one another in our overly digital world.  In its exploration of profound subjects such as human communication, romantic relationships, death and the afterlife, and familial ties, Dead Man's Cell Phone asks us to consider how we memorialize the dead, how that remembering changes us, and how technology both brings us together and keeps us apart.

Global Film​ Series - The Clan

The Clan.jpgThe Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen The Clan, directed by Pablo Trapero, oWednesday, October 26, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater.  

In what the New York Times ​has referred to as a "wrenching, exciting...study in the banality of evil," this critically acclaimed film explores the terrifying pathology of an outwardly normal family who "happens to keep hostages tied up in the basement."  These crimes are simultaneously all the more compelling and sinister because they take place during the Argentine military dictatorship in the 1980s, a regime that violently "disappeared" its opponents, and are based on real-life events of a family whose crimes were enabled by a climate of political violence and repression.  By examining this period from the perspective of the perpetrators and collaborators, this film compels viewers to consider the complex psychology of authoritarian power and the moral justifications we allow. There will be a post-screening discussion. ​​

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Global Film​ Series - 99 Homes​​

99 Homes.jpgThe Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen 99 Homes, directed by Ramin Bahrani, on Wednesday, September 28, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater.

In sunny Florida, unemployed single father Dennis Nash lives a life that is far from sunny.  After being evicted from his home, he reluctantly makes a deal with the devil by signing on to work for the ruthless real-estate broker who had evicted him.  In a suspenseful and high-stake climax, Nash face a difficult choice between his desire for the good life and his ethical convictions.  This gripping movie pits individual achievement against communal morality, compelling its characters - as well as its audience - to confront the complexities of doing business in 21st century America.  ​​​​There will be a post-screening discussion. ​​

Summer 2016

Hollister Gallery Show

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Playing with Fire by Nyia Yannatos

Paper Wall Sculpture Exhibit On View:
June 14 - August 10, 2016​​​​
Artist Talk and Opening Reception:
Wednesday, June 22, 3:30 PM, Hollister Gallery​

Spring 2016​

Cambridge Public Library and Center for Fiction New York Hosts Mary O'Donoghue Reading

On Thursday, May 5, at 6:30pm, at the Cambridge Public Library, in conjunction with the Harvard Bookstore, Mary O'Donoghue, Associate Professor of English, will read as part of An Evening with Granta: New Irish Writing, along with Colm Tóibín , Belinda McKeon, Sally Rooney and Stephen Sexton.  This group will also read in New York City on Wednesday, May 4, at 7pm, at the Center for Fiction in Manhattan.

Michael Martin, Finalist for the 2015 Lascaux Review

Michael Martin's book, Easiest If I Had A Gun, is a finalist for the 2015 Lascaux Review Short Story Collection Prize.  ​​​The Lascaux Review provides a showcase for emerging and established writers and artists.  Lascaux seeks stories, poems, es​says, and works of art that share a message and have a broad appeal.  The Review nominates work for the Pushcart Prize, Best of the Net, Best New Poets, Million Writers Award, and other honors as appropriate.

Kerry Rourke Receives the 2016 Babson Pride Award

At the 4th Annual Lavender Graduation on April 27, Kerry Rourke, Lecturer in English, received the Babson Pride Award in the faculty category.  The Award recognizes the significant contributions of those who join Babson College in its commitment to creating a community that values, supports, and celebrates lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and questioning (LGBTQ) individuals and their allies.​

The 2016 Wooten Prize for Excellence in Writing
1st Prize: Alexis Yioulos for the essay "A Sustainable Paradigm Shift: The Reclamation of Land and Autonomy ."
2nd Prize: Stephanie Khoo for the essay "The Industrialized Economy of the Commercial Bee Industry."
3rd Prize: Kabrina Lee for the essay "Anti-Miscegenation Laws: A Tool to Stigmatize Racial Relations to Maintain White Patriarchy and Racial Hierarchy."​

Elizabeth Goldberg Interviewed in the Modern Language Association News Digest
Click here​ to read an interview with Elizabeth Goldberg, Professor of English, about her new book, Teaching Human Rights in Literal and Cultural Studies, ​

The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poet Series
Linda Gregerson.jpgThis long-running poetry series has br​ought poets of highest distinction and international acclaim to the Babson campus. On Tuesday, April 5, at 7:00pm, we welcome Thompson Poet Linda Gregerson to the Sorenson Center.​  She ​is the a​uthor of seven collections of poetry, including New and Selected Poems (2015); The Selvage (2012); The Woman Who Died in Her Sleep, a finalist for the Lenore Marshall Prize and The Poets Prize; Magnetic North, a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award; and Waterborne, winner of the 2003 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Gregerson’s poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlan​​​​​​​​​​tic Monthly, Poetry, Granta, The Paris Review, The Kenyon Review, Best American Poetry, and many other journals and anthologies. A Renaissance scholar and a classically trained actor, she is Caroline Walker Bynum Distinguished University Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan. There she teaches creative writing and Renaissance literature and directs the Helen Zell Writers Program. 

​​Hollister Gallery Show​

The Cookbook of SecretsBill2CBSecret.jpg

Exhibit on View: March 24-May 16
Artist Talk and Reception: Thursday  March 24, 5:00 pm

Through their arts Collective The Bottega, William Petit and Candice Smith Corby share a passion for the rediscovery of the making, use, and implementation of ancient artist materials and their re-introduction into contemporary art-making. Their fascination with natural materials and how they relate to culinary ingredients have led them to develop The CookBook of Secrets, named for the Books of Secrets Alchemical texts. The exhibition will share pigment instructions and recipes with a Mediterranean influence.

Global Film​ Series - Chasing Ice

greenland_ice_melting.jpgThe Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen Chasing Ice, directed by Jeff Orlawski, on Wednesday, March 23, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater.

This Emmy-Award winning documentary tells the story of environmental photographer James Balog, who publicized the effects of climate change by capturing the historical polar ice melt on camera. Both chilling and awe-inspiring, Chasing Ice delivers powerful visual evidence of climate change that scientific and governmental papers cannot. It also opens up discussions about technology's role in mediating between humans and nature, and the responsibility of the audience for witnessing such a catastrophic event. ​​​​There will be a post-screening discussion. ​




Waterline Reading Series

Wednesday, March 2, 2016
Reynolds Global Lounge 5:00-6:30pm
Katherine Faigen, Poetry
Adam Schwartz, Fiction
Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.​​​

Naomi Klein to Speak at Babson

On Wednesday, February 24, at 7:00 P.M., in the Carling-Sorenson Naomi Klein pic.jpg​Theater, New York Times bestselling author of This Changes Everything, Naomi Klein, delivers a powerful lecture on the critical ​importance of addressing the free market economy in efforts to preserve the future of our planet.  As a leading critic of corporate globalization, Klein will ask us to reflect on the connections between the market and the planet - and what roles we can play in creating a just, sustainable future for all.

Hollister Gallery Show

Remediation Works by Azadeh TajpourRemediation Front without Shadow 1.7.16 Statement Sized.jpg

Exhibit on View: February 4 - March 11, 2016​​​​
Artist Talk and Opening Reception:
Thursday, February 4, 5:00 PM, Hollister Gallery

Azadeh Tajpour is interested in the ways we receive and perceive information, especially the lenses through which we look at "others" exploring the gray area between "us" and "other".  To this end, the artist uses video stills from an American Drone in Afghanistan as a source for drawings, stills from found video of the 2009-10 upheaval in Iran become the basis for paintings, and archival photos are layered on top of each other to highlight their original contradictory captions.  Though informed by different locations and events, each of the works uses the combination of the original media and the intervention of the artist to examine the layers of mediation through which we experience what happens "elsewhere". 


Danielle Krcmar Sculpts Gargoyles for Rebuilt ChurchEmail 33496 St Kateri - Gargoyle.JPG

Artist in Residence, Danielle Krcmar, is highlighted in this article​ about  rebuilding a church destroyed by a devastating tornado. 




FALL 2015

​​Hollister Gallery Show

​Being Here, Going Beyond Paintings by Percy Fortini-Wright 

Exhibit on View: November 5, 2015 - January 8, 2016 
Artist Talk and Reception:
Thursday November 5, 5:00 pm Hollister Gallery

November 4.jpgFrom an early age, Percy Fortini-Wright was integrating the influences of Fine art and Street art; DJ Kon, a family friend and renowned record collector, taught him graffiti, and his grandmother was an accomplished watercolorist. His paint handling is both improvisational and disciplined, whether he is using the spray can or brush. Being multiracial, the artist is interested in combining diverse material approaches and imagery; drawing from direct observation, memory and invention to create urban streetscapes and bold portraits of imaginary personae that share a beautiful sense of movement and anticipation. Click here​ to see more of Fortini- Wright’s portfolio.


Global Film​ Series - Two Days, One Night

On Wednesday, November 4, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater, the Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen Two Days, One Night, directed by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne.

In this profoundly affecting, suspenseful film, a working-class Belgian woman discovers that her workmates have been offered a significant pay bonus in exchange for her dismissal. She has only one weekend to persuade her colleagues to give up their bonuses in order to save her job before time runs out. Starring Academy Award winner Marion Cotillard, Two Days, One Night is powerful story about what happens when community solidarity conflicts with individual needs and desires. Click here​ to read an article about the film.

Mary Pinard Presents The Teacher Within

​​​​​​How often do we pause to reflect on who we are as teachers, what values we bring to our teaching, what motivates us to continue and challenge ourselves regarding our pedagogy?  Who is the teacher within?  On Wednesday, October 7, at Noon in the Glavin Chapel, Mary Pinard, Professor of English, will explore some of these questions, and how they may contribute to more satisfying and successful teaching. She blends practical teaching tools with transformational teaching tips, and opens opportunities for reflection.

​​​​​Book Reading with Julie Levinson
Professor Julie Levinson will be doing a book reading​ from her recently published book, The American Success Myth on Film, on Wednesday, September 30, from 7:00-8:00pm at the New England Mobile Book Fair, 82 Needham Street, Newton Highland, MA.

Hollister Gallery Show

Dear Erin Hart by Jessamyn Lovell

09/10/2015 - 10/20/2015  Erin Hart.jpg
Hollister Hall - Lobby 

Artist Talk and Reception:
Thursday, September 14, 5:00 PM

Dear Erin Hart is the body of work made by Lovell in response to the identity theft and the crimes committed in her name. In order to understand her transgressor’s actions and motivation, the artist documented relevant places, interviewed witnesses, hired a private investigator, and survei​lled Erin Hart, photographing her as she was released from jail. Using photography, video and other means to document and understand the full arc of the identity theft, Lovell gained empathy for her identity thief. Dear Erin Hart was featured on This American Life in May. The story group is called same bed different dreams, Jessamyn’s story is the third act.  Lovell’s work explores issues of class, identity, privacy, and the use of art as a means of creating agency and empathy. Click here​ to see more of her work. 

Virginia Rademacher Receives Dean's Award for Undergraduate Teaching

Each year the Deans recognize a Babson Faculty for his/her excellence and innovative practices in teaching.  This year's award was presented to Professor Virginia (Jenny) Rademacher.  "Moths to flame" was used in the award citation to describe students in relation to Jenny as teacher, administrator, advisor and mentor.  

Summer 2015

Michael Gerhard Martin Awarded Best of Show

Michael Gerhard Martin's new short story, "Gretel," was awarded Best of Show in the fiction category at the Marblehead Arts Festival.  He will be awarded a ribbon on July 1, 2015.  

Spring 2015

The 2015 Wooten Prize for Excellence in Writing

1st Prize: Rehanna Stepnoski for the essay "If No Knitting Needles."
2nd Prize: Robert Sternberg for the essay "The Happier Eden: Love and Marriage Across Milton's The Doctrine & Discipline of Divorce and Paradise Lost."
3rd Prize: Peter Van Noppen for the essay "Mass Extinctions, Arks, and the Human Role."

Literary Journal AGNI Welcomes Mary O'Donoghue as Fiction Editor

Mary O'Donoghue will join William Giraldi as Fiction Editor​ of the top-ranking journal AGNI. After three of her stories were published by the journal, 2005 to 2009, Mary was invited to join its staff as a Fiction Reader. Now, as Fiction Editor, she will "play a bigger, much-deserved role in guiding the magazine" (AGNI). The journal was founded in 1972 at Antioch College by Askold Melnyczuk. It is now housed at Boston University, with Sven Birkerts as its Editor. It has published 81 issues, most of them including work from multiple languages. It is known for publishing important new writers early in their careers (Jhumpa Lahiri, Ha Jin), as well as such luminaries as Seamus Heaney, Joyce Carol Oates, and Derek Walcott.​​​

Waterline Reading Series

Wednesday, April 8, 2015
Glavin Chapel 5:30pm
Carolyn Megan, Essayist and Fiction Writer
Elizabeth​ Young, Fiction Writer
Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.​

Global Film​ Series - The Wind Rises

On Monday, April 6, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater, the Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen The Wind Rises, directed by Hayao Miyazaki.
 
In Japanese animation master Miyazaki's final film, Jiro dreams of flying and designing beautiful airplanes.  Nearsighted from a young age and unable to be a pilot, Jiro joins​ a major Japanese engineering company in 1927 and becomes one of the world's most innovative and accomplished airplane designers, creating beautiful machines which are put to deadly use.  Film critic David Ehrlich called the film, "Perhaps the greatest animated film ever made...a devastatingly honest lament for the corruption of beauty."
 
Ian Condry, Professor of Japanese Cultural Studies at M.I.T., will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion. 

Jason Mohaghegh To Speak at CWEL Faculty Gender Research Luncheon

The Center for Women's Entrepreneurial Leadership (CWEL) celebrates their 3rd year of gathering faculty and staff to share and discuss compelling research on gendered topics. Jason Mohaghegh, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, will speak on 'The Unseen Militant: Women and Extremism in the Contemporary Middle East'. 
 
This event will take place on Thursday, April 2, in Reynolds 241, from Noon to 1:30pm.  Lunch is provided, please RSVP to Marjorie Feld at mfeld@babson.edu by March 30.

Kerry Rouke Receives the Martin Luther King Jr. Award

The Martin Luther King Jr. Leadership Award ​honors members of the Babson community (students, faculty, staff, groups, or organizations) who reflect Dr. King’s principles and ideals in philosophy and action. Please join us in congratulating this year’s winner: Kerry Rourke!

Hollister Gallery Show ​

El Paso KidOct Gallery.jpg
Self-Portraits by Raul Gonzalez

3/25/2015 - 5/5/2015  
Hollister Hall - Lobby 
Artist Talk and Reception:
Wednesday, March 25, 5:00 PM
​​​​​​​​Raul Gonzalez grew up going back and forth between Cuidad Juarez, Mexico and El Paso, Texas; where he was born. He reflects on his life in La Frontera, an environment that is most often un-represented and un-seen through self-portraits that integrate imagery from the old time west, cartoons, cultural stereotypes, and art history.

Beth Wynstra Announces Spring Production for The Empty Space Theater (TEST)

"The Empty Space Theater will be celebrating the 100th Anniversary of The Provincetown Players, one of America's most important and influential theater companies, with four one-act plays," announced Professor Beth Wynstra, Artistic Director of TEST. The plays and directors are as follows:
 
Suppressed Desires, Directed by Jon Adler, Professor at Olin College
Freedom, Directed by Kai Haskins, Class of 2018
Lima Beans, Directed by Adam Sanders, Associate Director of BabsonArts
Constancy, Directed by Beth Wynstra
Dates: March 8, 9, 10
Time: 8:00 PM
At: Roger's Pub

Waterline Reading Series

Wednesday, March 4, 2015
Glavin Chapel 5:30pm
Michael G. Martin, Fiction Writer
featuring new story collection, Easiest If I Had A Gun
Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.​

Beth Wynstra Interviewed by WBUR

On Friday, February 6, Beth Wynstra, Artistic Director of The Empty Space Theater (TEST), was interviewed by WBUR's The ARTery ​about TEST's spring production, The PROVINCETOWN FOUR

Mary O'Donoghue on Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award Longlist

The 19-strong longlist is made up of writers from four different countries, including Associate Professor of English, Mary O'Donoghue. The world's richest prize for a single short story, the Suday Times EFG Short Story Award shortlist will be revealed in March and the winner will be announced at an award ceremony on April 24.  O'Donoghue is being recognized for her short story, 'Jules Verne Seeks Dreamers for Long-Distance​ Travel in Time'.

Michael G. Martin Recognized for His Writings

Michael G. Martin's The Strange Ways People Are: Stories (short fiction collection, retitled Easiest If I Had A Gun), was a finalist for The Iowa Short Fiction & John Simmons Short Fiction Awards.  He was also a semi-finalist for The Hudson Prize for the same book.

Mary O'Donoghue Nominated for 2016 Pushcart Prize

Georgia Review.jpg​Associate Professor of English Mary O'Donoghue's short story "Jules Verne Seeks Dreamers for Long-Distance Travel in Time” has just been nominated for a 2016 Pushcart Prize.  The story appeared in the spring 2014 issue of the quarterly literary journal The Georgia Review, and is described in the Editorial as “literally out-of-this-world (some of the time).”  

O’Donoghue’s story concerns a father shuttling supplies to a space station, a mother in a memoir-writing class, and a daughter in love with a boy with a blood disease.  The Georgia Review was founded in 1947 at the University of Georgia, and is considered one of the most highly respected journals in the US.  The Pushcart Prize Series has been publishing anthologies since 1976.  The series honors the best fiction, poetry and essays published in literary journals in the course of a year. Prizewinners will be announced in spring 2015. ​



The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poet Series

This long-running poetry series has brought poets of highest distinctionThompson Poet for Feb. 15.jpg and international acclaim to the Babson campus. On Wednesday, February 18, at 7:00pm, we welcome Thompson Poet Fred D'Aguiar to the Sorenson Center. He is a poet, novelist, playwright and the Gloria D. Smith Professor of Africana Studies at Virginia Tech.  D'Aguiar's dozen books of poetry and fiction have been translated into a dozen languages.  His first collection of poetry, Mama Dot (1985), was published to wide acclaim.  It established his reputation as one of the finest British poets of his generation and, along with the collection of Airy Hall (1989), won the Guyana Poetry Prize in 1989.  D'Aguiar's first novel, The Longest Memory (1994), won the Whitbread First Novel Award and was made into a film by Channel 4 (UK).  His 2009 collection Continental Shelf was shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot Prize.  His most recent collection is The Rose of Toulouse (2012).  Admission is free, and open to the public.




Global Film Series - Watchers of the Sky

On Wednesday, February 11, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater, the Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen Watchers of the Sky, directed by Edet Belzberg.

Watchers of the Sky​ interweaves four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, while setting out to uncover the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin – the man who created the word “genocide,” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by the United Nations Ambassador Samantha Power’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, A Problem From Hell, Watchers of the Sky takes viewers on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action. 

Kerry Propper, one of the producers of Watchers of the Sky,, will​ introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion​​

Hollister Gallery Show ​

A MendOct Gallery.jpg
Embroidery and Fiber-work by Aram Ram Han

01/29/2015 - 03/17/2015  
Hollister Hall - Lobby 
Artist Talk and Reception:
Thursday, January 29, 5:00 PM
​Aram Han uses craft processes of sewing and embroidery to address the economics of compensation for immigrant and artist labor. She will exhibit 70 samplers from her Immigrant Citizenship Sampler Project and A Mend, a sculpture created by collecting and sewing together the denim hem remnants from Chicago seamstresses and tailors.​​

Fall 2014​​

Babson Night at "Happy Days" by Samuel Beckett, Pre-show discussion with Beth Wynstra

Commonwealth Shakespeare Company is presenting a six-day run of "Happy Days" by Samuel Beckett, from November 19-23, at 8:00 pm in Carling-Sorenson Theater.  Tuesday, November 18th is designated Babson Night, offering students, faculty and staff discount tickets. Before this show, Assistant Professor of English Beth Wynstra will lead a discussion of Samuel Beckett’s work.  The talk will highlight moments from Beckett’s biography, introduce key characteristics of Absurdist drama, and explore the contexts and lasting influence of Happy Days and other works by Beckett. The Talk begins at 7pm in the theater upper lobby.  
Questions? Email info@commshakes.org or call (617) 426-0863.

Michael G. Martin Participates in Newbury College Speaker Series

Newbury College will host Babson College Lecturer, Michael Gerhard Martin, at its 2014-15 Speaker Series on Wednesday, November 19 at 5:30pm at the Mitton House Library.  He will read from his new book of short stories, "Easiest if I Had a Gun".  According to author Richard Hoffman, "Michael Gerhard Martin can make you wince and laugh and tear-up and cringe all in the same moment.  The stories in this collection map the joy and cruelty and defeat and stoic perseverance of characters who bear, in their daily lives, burdens they only partly understand but carry with resilience and dignity.  Each of these stories is an exquisite, pitch-perfect performance, and the people you meet in them will remain with you long after you finish this remarkable book."

Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg's blog, "On Happy En

dings'

With the support of Babson's Lewis Institute, ​Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg, Chair of Arts and Humanities and Professor of English, is able to continue her research and passion for fighting slavery, human trafficking, poverty, and marginalization of women.  Read blog here​ about her recent trip to India.

Jason Mohaghegh Presents at Babson Symposium 

Emergent World Thought: Violence, Desire, and the Revolutionary Body

Tuesday, November 4, 5-7 p.m. at Olin Auditorium 
This symposium tracks some of the most provocative events now in motion across the contemporary world: secret philosophies; outsider territories and art-forms. Through a series of fast-moving, cutting-edge images and texts, we will see how different global regions are engaged in radical transformations of time, space, movement, desire, violence, and the body. Speakers include Craig Epplin of Portland State University; Dejan Lukic of the School of Visual Arts; and Jason Mohaghegh, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Babson College. ​​ The full presentation can be found here​.

Beth Wynstra and Sandra Graham Direct Babson's Fall Production, Urinetown

Urinetown by Mark Hollman and Greg Kotis 
Directed by Professor Beth Wynstra
Musical Direction by Professor Sandra Graham
October 30, 31, and November 1 at 8:00 PM ​
at the Carling-Sorenson Theater 
​​
Tickets available here​.

Hollister Gallery Show ​

​​Strange Surroundings Oct Gallery.jpg
Paintings by Resa Blatman 

10/23/2014 - 01/15/2015  
Hollister Hall - Lobby 
Artist Talk and Reception:
Thursday, October 23, 5:00 pm

"Resa Blatman's fractured and layered relief paintings are suggestive of landscapes in flux.  Her relationship to the first-hand observation of these glacial landscapes is heavily mediated, like most people's relationship to the environment. Blatman's quintessentially post-modern paintings are montages of altered, appropriated photographs representing narrative time as layered.  They seem both timeless​ and apocalyptic.  These beautiful yet ominous paintings offer both premonition and a requiem for a fragile environment - a melancholic Sublime." 
- Amy Schlegel, Director of the Galleries and Collections, Tufts University Arts Center ​

Waterline Reading Series

Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Glavin Chapel 5:30pm
Melissa Leonard, Creative Non-Fiction
Mary Pinard, Poetry
Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.​

Elizabeth Goldberg Presents at Center for Women's Entrepreneurial Leadership Luncheon

On Wednesday, October 8, at Noon in Reynolds 241, Elizabeth Swanson Goldberg, Professor of English and Chair of Ma​de by Survivors​, will share findings from recent field research about the challenges and rewards of partnering with survivors of brothel slavery to produce creative, high-wage, sustainable livelihoods capable of protecting against re-trafficking and other forms of gendered oppression and discrimination.

Global Film Series - The Lunchbox

On Tuesday, September 30, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater, the Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen The Lunchbox, directed by Ritesh Batra.

Mumbai's famously efficient lunchbox delivery system makes a rare mistaken delivery, bringing a young housewife and an older man together through notes in the daily lunchbox.  

Samir Dayal, Associate Professor of English and Media Studies at Bentley University, will​ introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion. 

Mary O'Donoghue Translates Work of Poet Louis de Paor

In addition to writing poems, short stories, and novels, Mary O’Donoghue, Associate Professor of English, also translates the work of Irish-language poet Louis de Paor. Her latest translations of de Paor feature in a new bilingual volume, The Brindled Cat and the Nightingale's Tongue. “Keenly aware of the more destructive aspects of translation, he (de Paor) and his trio of translators, Kevin Anderson, Biddy Jenkinson and Mary O'Donoghue, have eschewed the modern fashion for so-called "versions", producing English translations which are as close as possible to the original Irish poems without sacrificing their tone, energy, clarity and lightness of touch.” says UK publisher Bloodaxe Books. ​​​

A Review of Professor Mary Pinard's Book, Portal

In his attention to Professor Pinard's form in her collection of poems, Portal, Jacob Strautmann's review in Salamander has captured not only the architecture of Mary's work, but also its deepest philosophical engine.  As he notes, "Portal is a dynamic portrayal of healing as form is torqued to its near breaking pint and then reshaped.  The beauty of Pinard's craft lies in its carpentry."  You may see the complete review here​.

Hollister Gallery Show            Mittelman.jpg

You're right.  That would be awesome.  

 Sculpture and Drawing by Michael Mittleman  September 10 to October 15, 2014, Hollister Gallery
Artist Talk and Reception: Wednesday, September 10, 5pm

Mittelman's artworks use refined materials to explore the human need for connection.  His layered acrylic sculptures of hands focus on the communicative power of  gesture, "thoughts that have come to me but remain unsaid" are the inspiratin for text-based ink on mylar drawings in the Constructive Dialogue Series.​