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Art and Humanities Course Listing

Undergraduate

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AHS1000 - AHS FOUNDATION

AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 AHS Foundation 4 credits THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON IN FALL 2013 OR LATER. AHS Foundation 4 credit foundation liberal arts The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

4.00 credits

AHS1000 - HNRS AHS FOUNDATION

HNRS AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 AHS Foundation 4 credits THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON IN FALL 2013 OR LATER. AHS Foundation 4 credit foundation liberal arts The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

4.00 credits

ARB1200 - INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC

INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC

ARB1200 Introduction to Arabic 4 credits, General Credit, Faculty An introduction to the essentials of standard Arabic, the language used in public communications throughout the Arab world. This course introduces students to Arabic sounds, how to read and write in the Arabic alphabet, and the basics of everyday conversation. Through the use of a variety of written, video, and audio materials, this course emphasizes authentic materials and stresses the active participation of students in the learning process. Students are also exposed to cultural topics, discussions, and co-curricular opportunities with the goal of exposure to the diverse cultural contexts in which the language is used. (4 credits) Students are strongly encouraged to consider taking Beyond Revolution: Radical Thought in the Middle East (LVA2476) as a complement to this course.

4.00 credits

ART1171 - MIXED MEDIA DRAWING

MIXED MEDIA DRAWING

ART1171 Mixed Media Drawing (General Credit) This is an introductory level course designed to bring students through basic aspects of drawing in a wide range of media. No previous experience is required. Issues such as line, tone, mark making, gesture form, light sources, figure/ground relationships, and perspective to overall compositions will be addressed separately and in the many ways that they relate to one another in a drawing. Students will draw observationally from life and from their own drawings, learning how to use each of these concepts as tools in order to draw and see more analytically. We will work with a wide range of materials from basic graphite pencils and charcoal, to ink washes, conte crayon on gesso treated paper, silverpoint, collage, and printmaking. Slides of various artists' work will be discussed in relation to concepts and processes explored in class. Student work will be discussed in group critiques with full class participation. Students should be committed to expanding their skills and can expect project deadlines. There will be some expense for materials. Prerequisites: NONE This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

CHN1210 - ELEMENTARY CHINESE LANGUAGE I

ELEMENTARY CHINESE LANGUAGE I

CHN1210 Elementary Chinese Language I (General Credit) An introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively. Prerequisite: None This course is typically offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

CVA2001 - ETHICS (PHL)

ETHICS (PHL)

CVA2001 Introduction to Ethics 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Discussions relate morality to the life and circumstances of contemporary society by offering a solid grounding in the major concepts of ethical theory and in the basic skills for analyzing ethical issues and making sound moral judgments. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Fall and Spring semesters.

4.00 credits

CVA2007 - INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY (PHL)

INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY (PHL)

CVA2407 Introduction to Philosophy 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Introduction to Philosophy treats the most basic and pervasive human questions: Does God exist? What is the nature of the self? What is the relationship between our mind and our body? Do human beings have an immortal soul? Do we have free will? What is the difference between a human being and a computer? How can value judgments be justified? What is the proper relationship between the individual and the community? What is the best kind of human life? Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

CVA2012 - SF2 WEST AS FRONTIER IN AMER IMAG

SF2 WEST AS FRONTIER IN AMER IMAG

CVA2411 The West as Frontier in the American Imagination 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) In this course, we investigate the myths, realities and hopes associated with the American West: that ever-moving frontier of the mind and body where visions of American national identity are invented and celebrated, contested and re-imagined. Our texts will include autobiographies, novels, short stories, historical essays, poems, films, photographs, and other images. Authors may range from Walt Whitman to Willa Cather, from Zitkala-Sa to Sui Sin Far; representations on film may extend from "Chinatown" to "Brokeback Mountain"; in "The Social Network", we can find the American success story in a classic bi-coastal transplant plot, with Silicon Valley as the new frontier. When Horace Greeley issued his famous advice to Civil War veterans, “Go West, young man!”, he went on to say, “Go West, and grow up with the country.” As we will see, the West is still that mythic place where the country is forever young and restless, questioning and creative, inventing the future. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation H&S and A&H This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring or Fall

4.00 credits

CVA2057 - IMAGINING SUSTAINABILITY (INTDIS)

IMAGINING SUSTAINABILITY (INTDIS)

CVA2457 Imagining Sustainability: Nature, Humanity, Business and the End of Sorrow 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The primary focus of this course is on the exploration of the concept of sustainability as a juncture of economic, environmental and social concerns. With the rapid expansion of globalization, and the attenuating crises that accompany it, with regard to these concerns, future business and public policy leaders will need to be in the vanguard at determining how best to effect solutions. To that end, this course will examine a variety of sources in the consideration both of what allows for the implementation of sustainability and what prohibits it--from business case study to philosophical/economic analysis to literary memoir. Within this context, students will be invited to examine what we mean when we talk about "justice," "ethics," "profit," "growth," and "community." In sum, we will explore how concepts that contribute to our understanding of individual and communal responsibility might be revisited and redefined in the effort to create a world that offers sustainable economic opportunity for all, ensured within a vital commitment to environmental stewardship. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Spring or a Summer semester.

4.00 credits

ENG3605 - WRITING FICTION

WRITING FICTION

ENG3605 Writing Fiction (Advanced Liberal Arts) Flannery O'Connor said there is "a certain grain of stupidity that the writer of fiction can hardly do without, and this is the quality of having to stare, of not getting the point at once." This class (while not demanding that you cultivate stupidity!) develops and nurtures close attention to how short fiction is made. You will study the art and craft of making short stories. This course emphasizes reading, whereby we will study practitioners of the short story form in order to understand the elements of fiction: character, dialogue, place/setting, plot, and so on. In class, we will take stories apart to see just 'how they tick'. In addition, we will (as pleasure-seekers) look for enjoyment in what we read. By and large, this course runs on writing. You will write short stories of varying lengths, aiming for authority over language, characterization and plot, and authenticity. Your fiction will be closely analyzed by your peers and professor. So you must be a willing, open and active participant, prepared to discuss the work of others, and to reflect on responses to your own work. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS) This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.

4.00 credits

FRN2600 - INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

FRN2600 Intermediate French Language and Culture I (Advanced Liberal Arts) Active use of contemporary spoken and written French through dialog practice, oral presentations, class discussions, and written exercises. By becoming more aware of the French speaking world and the relationship between culture and language, students increase their ability to communicate in international environments. The program features web-based audio and video interaction with native speakers. Prerequisite: FRN1200 (Equivalent of one year of college French as demonstrated through a required placement test) This course is typically offered in the Fall.

4.00 credits

FRN3600 - FRENCH 3600:CINEMA, CULTURE,CONVERSATION

FRENCH 3600:CINEMA, CULTURE,CONVERSATION

FRN3600 Advanced French 3600: Cinema, Culture, Conversation Course Description: This course is designed as an advanced-level conversation class, with a strong cultural component. The major course materials are French films and supplementary readings. These films and readings serve as the basis for debate, discussion and written analysis of issues relevant to the history, culture and politics of France and the francophone world of North Africa and the Caribbean, with a focus on global issues of social concern. This course is designed for students who have mastered the grammatical structures of French, although there will be review of grammar as needed. Films will be on reserve at Horn Library, and screenings will be scheduled. Prerequisites: FRN 2601 Intermediate French II at Babson, or equivalent proficiency as demonstrated through a required placement test. This course is not open to native speakers.

4.00 credits

GDR3620 - THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE

THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE

This Course will meet beginning on October 22nd and end on December 17th. GDR THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE 2 credit advanced liberal arts This course will institutionalize the work of the Gender Film Initiative, a project born out of CWEL with the goal of producing short films focused on gender issues in the classroom to be used in Babson FME classes. In this course, students will engage with gender theory as well as learn techniques for creating characters, developing conflict, and crafting plot for a short film script. Students will, by course’s end, develop a script for a ten-minute film and will be responsible for the rehearsal, production, and post-production work of the film. A secondary, long-term goal of the course is to market the film for use in other Babson courses and, perhaps, to other academic institutions. Prerequisites: 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS LVA CVA)

2.00 credits

HUM3600 - SEMINAR IN HUMAN RIGHTS

SEMINAR IN HUMAN RIGHTS

Please note begin and end dates: This course takes place during the first half of the semester HUM3600 Seminar in Human Rights 2 credit advanced liberal arts This seminar will explore the concept of human rights from its origins to the present, paying particular attention to the international human rights apparatus that emerged in the wake of WWII. Students will learn about different categories of rights (civil and political; economic, social, and cultural) and about the global distribution of rights. Questions to be explored include: How have individuals and groups claimed rights in different times and places? How has the category “human” been used to include or exclude people from human rights protections? What happens when the rhetoric of human rights is mobilized by governments or other actors as a cover for intervention or abuses? What are the ethics of representing human rights violations in media and cultural texts such as novels and films? The main project for the course will be an intensive human rights practicum in which students will apply their knowledge of dignity and rights to a human rights issue, problem, or organization. Prerequisites: Three intermediate courses (CVA, LVA, HSS)

2.00 credits

JPN1200 - ELEMENTARY JAPANESE LANG & CULT I

ELEMENTARY JAPANESE LANG & CULT I

JPN1200 Elementary Japanese Language and Culture I (General Credit) An introduction to a practical, and functional knowledge of Japanese as it is used in contemporary society. Students will learn the fundamental use of the Japanese language by exercising all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Two basic writing systems, hiragana and katakana, are taught to promote literacy in Japanese environments. An introduction to Japanese culture, which is inseparable from learning the language, is provided through demonstrations, videos and films. Prerequisite: None This course is typically offered in the following semester: Fall

4.00 credits

LIB5650 - CROSS REGISTRATION AT WELLESLEY COLLEGE

CROSS REGISTRATION AT WELLESLEY COLLEGE

4.00 credits

LIB5650 - CROSS REGISTRATION AT OLIN COLLEGE

CROSS REGISTRATION AT OLIN COLLEGE

4.00 credits

LIB5651 - CROSS REGISTRATION AT OLIN COLLGE

CROSS REGISTRATION AT OLIN COLLGE

4.00 credits

LVA2004 - LOVE, SEX AND FAMILY 20TH CENTURY AMERIC

LOVE, SEX AND FAMILY 20TH CENTURY AMERIC

LVA2004 Love, Sex and the Family in Mid-Twentieth-Century American Literature 4 credit intermediate liberal arts "First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes baby in the baby carriage." This childhood ditty seems to inculcate the "right" order of things in the act of family-making in America. But lives played out in times of cultural transition aren't always as neat as nursery rhymes. Mid-twentieth-century America was characterized by changing gender roles and definitions, geographic and demographic shifts, war, and burgeoning technology, among other things. This course looks at fiction and drama to see how great American authors such as Tennessee Williams, Flannery O'Connor and Richard Yates portrayed and, perhaps, shaped the mid-century American understanding of love, sex, and family. We will supplement literary readings with relevant non-fiction from the time period. Students will propose, research, and develop a major essay about an author and/or a concept related to the course materials. Students will also formally present their ideas to the class. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and (AH & HS) or AHF

4.00 credits

LVA2010 - AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT (LIT)

AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT (LIT)

LVA2010 African American Literature This course will introduce students to the African American literary tradition starting with the slave narrative and concluding with contemporary literary production. Along the way, we will consider the move from oral to written literatures, the aesthetic forms created and adapted by African American writers, and the role of African American letters in chronicling and shaping the experience of African American people. Our study will be informed by major historical moments —slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Great Migration from south to north, the Civil Rights and post-Civil rights eras—and we will read work by writers such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and (AH & HS) or AHS

4.00 credits

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