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Course Catalog

The Course Catalog includes course descriptions of all courses offered by the Undergraduate School at Babson College. For descriptions of the courses offered in the current or upcoming semesters, please see the Course Listing.

 

 Undergraduate Course Catalog

 
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Arts & Humanities

A&H FOUNDATION

AHF1300 (Fall) Dwellings: Body, Home, and City (A&H Foundation) THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON BEFORE SEPT. 2013. Dwellings are physical structures that house us and provide the external conditions for our development: We dwell in a body, a home, and a village, town, or city. Paradoxically, however, dwelling is also a mental and emotional activity. When we dwell on an idea, an event, a person, or a place, we find it difficult to let it go: it quite literally occupies us. Our dwellings-both in space and in time-shape the ways we identify with ourselves and others. In this course we will analyze works of art and philosophy that help us explore questions about dwelling: How do our bodies as lived in and as represented influence how we view ourselves and are viewed by others? What is the nature of home? What do our dwellings have to do with our own and others' sense of belonging in the world? How do the forms and voices that artists and philosophers invent encourage new ways of understanding dwelling in relation to such structures as family, education, class, gender, and race? Prerequisite: NONE AHF1300 (Spring) Nature, Culture, Progress (A&H Foundation) THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON BEFORE SEPT. 2013. Humans are part of nature yet distinct from it in complex ways. Our natural instincts do not completely define us; we are also cultural beings with traditions, identities and technologies that distinguish us from nature. This distinction has led to the claim that humans are superior to nature and so are entitled to manipulate it. Humans' divergence from nature also suggests that we are capable of progress: of bettering ourselves intellectually, morally, technologically. In this course, we will examine these claims by asking questions such as: to what extent are humans a product of nature and to what extent are we formed by culture? How does our answer to this question affect our perception of ourselves, others, and the world around us? When is progress good, and when does it instead decrease the quality of human life and harm nature? We will explore these questions through readings of literature and philosophy, and through film and the visual arts. Prerequisite: NONE

AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 AHS Foundation 4 credits THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON IN FALL 2013 OR LATER. AHS Foundation 4 credit foundation liberal arts The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

HNRS AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 AHS Foundation 4 credits THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON IN FALL 2013 OR LATER. AHS Foundation 4 credit foundation liberal arts The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

HONORS AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 Honors AHS Foundation 4 credits THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON IN FALL 2013 OR LATER. AHS Foundation 4 credit foundation liberal arts The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC

ARB1200 Introduction to Arabic 4 credits, General Credit, Faculty An introduction to the essentials of standard Arabic, the language used in public communications throughout the Arab world. This course introduces students to Arabic sounds, how to read and write in the Arabic alphabet, and the basics of everyday conversation. Through the use of a variety of written, video, and audio materials, this course emphasizes authentic materials and stresses the active participation of students in the learning process. Students are also exposed to cultural topics, discussions, and co-curricular opportunities with the goal of exposure to the diverse cultural contexts in which the language is used. (4 credits) Students are strongly encouraged to consider taking Beyond Revolution: Radical Thought in the Middle East (LVA2476) as a complement to this course.

MIXED MEDIA DRAWING

ART1171 Mixed Media Drawing (General Credit) This is an introductory level course designed to bring students through basic aspects of drawing in a wide range of media. No previous experience is required. Issues such as line, tone, mark making, gesture form, light sources, figure/ground relationships, and perspective to overall compositions will be addressed separately and in the many ways that they relate to one another in a drawing. Students will draw observationally from life and from their own drawings, learning how to use each of these concepts as tools in order to draw and see more analytically. We will work with a wide range of materials from basic graphite pencils and charcoal, to ink washes, conte crayon on gesso treated paper, silverpoint, collage, and printmaking. Slides of various artists' work will be discussed in relation to concepts and processes explored in class. Student work will be discussed in group critiques with full class participation. Students should be committed to expanding their skills and can expect project deadlines. There will be some expense for materials. Prerequisites: NONE This course may be offered Fall semester.

INTRO TO SCULPTURE

ART1172 Introduction to Sculpture (General Credit) This is an introductory level studio art course designed to engage you with basic sculptural concepts and processes through the creation of your own sculpture. Working with basic material such as plasticene, plaster, wood, and wire, we will learn carving, modeling, and other methods of construction as we explore assignments that parallel historical approaches and processes. As a means of developing a full range of approaches towards making sculpture, we will examine paleo-lithic sculpture; Egyptian, Greek, and Renaissance bas-relief sculpture; abstract, kinetic and minimal sculpture; and installation and conceptual art. Students will be asked to keep a sketchbook for the development and critique of visual ideas. Through visualization, drawing, design, construction, and critique of sculpture, students will expand their skills of observation, critical analysis, and creative problem solving. Prerequisite: NONE This course may be offered Spring semester.

CHINESE LANG AND CULT FOR GLOBAL PROF

CH1205 Chinese Language and Culture for Global Professionals Weina Zhao, MA, Foreign Language Education, Lecturer in Chinese Language In this unique four credit academic experience, you will spend three weeks this summer at Babson and travel for an 8-day international study component in Shanghai. Get immersed in the language and culture of China, enhance your cultural awareness and business communication skills in Chinese (Mandarin), and learn about China’s emergence as a global economic power. Travel Dates: Summer I (Babson: May 20-June 5; China: June 6-15, 2014) Pre-departure Academic Session Dates: 9:00 am- 12:00 pm/May 20th -June 5th, 2014* Babson Electives Abroad Orientation Dates: 12:30 pm- 2:30 pm/May 22nd, 2014* *Attendance required

ELEMENTARY CHINESE LANGUAGE I

CHN1210 Elementary Chinese Language I (General Credit) An introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively. Prerequisite: None This course is typically offered Fall semester.

ELEMENTARY CHINESE II

CHN1211 Elementary Chinese Language II (General Credit) A continuation of the fall semester, an introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively. Prerequisite: CHN1210 This course is typically offered Spring semester

ETHICS (PHL)

CVA2001 Introduction to Ethics 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Discussions relate morality to the life and circumstances of contemporary society by offering a solid grounding in the major concepts of ethical theory and in the basic skills for analyzing ethical issues and making sound moral judgments. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Fall and Spring semesters.

INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY (PHL)

CVA2407 Introduction to Philosophy 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Introduction to Philosophy treats the most basic and pervasive human questions: Does God exist? What is the nature of the self? What is the relationship between our mind and our body? Do human beings have an immortal soul? Do we have free will? What is the difference between a human being and a computer? How can value judgments be justified? What is the proper relationship between the individual and the community? What is the best kind of human life? Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Fall semester.

SF2 WEST AS FRONTIER IN AMER IMAG

CVA2411 The West as Frontier in the American Imagination 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) In this course, we investigate the myths, realities and hopes associated with the American West: that ever-moving frontier of the mind and body where visions of American national identity are invented and celebrated, contested and re-imagined. Our texts will include autobiographies, novels, short stories, historical essays, poems, films, photographs, and other images. Authors may range from Walt Whitman to Willa Cather, from Zitkala-Sa to Sui Sin Far; representations on film may extend from "Chinatown" to "Brokeback Mountain"; in "The Social Network", we can find the American success story in a classic bi-coastal transplant plot, with Silicon Valley as the new frontier. When Horace Greeley issued his famous advice to Civil War veterans, “Go West, young man!”, he went on to say, “Go West, and grow up with the country.” As we will see, the West is still that mythic place where the country is forever young and restless, questioning and creative, inventing the future. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation H&S and A&H This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring or Fall

IMAGINING SUSTAINABILITY (INTDIS)

CVA2457 Imagining Sustainability: Nature, Humanity, Business and the End of Sorrow 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The primary focus of this course is on the exploration of the concept of sustainability as a juncture of economic, environmental and social concerns. With the rapid expansion of globalization, and the attenuating crises that accompany it, with regard to these concerns, future business and public policy leaders will need to be in the vanguard at determining how best to effect solutions. To that end, this course will examine a variety of sources in the consideration both of what allows for the implementation of sustainability and what prohibits it--from business case study to philosophical/economic analysis to literary memoir. Within this context, students will be invited to examine what we mean when we talk about "justice," "ethics," "profit," "growth," and "community." In sum, we will explore how concepts that contribute to our understanding of individual and communal responsibility might be revisited and redefined in the effort to create a world that offers sustainable economic opportunity for all, ensured within a vital commitment to environmental stewardship. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Spring or a Summer semester.

FOOD AND THE AFRICAN AMER CANON II

AFRICAN AMER MUSIC IN THE US (INT)

CVA2430 African American Music in the U.S. (INTDIS) 3 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course is a survey of music created by and about African Americans from the 19th century to the present, including spirituals, gospel, ragtime, theater music, blues, jazz, classical, R&B, rock and roll, soul, funk, and rap. The course will emphasize: (1) African origins, and the historical and sociocultural contexts in which African American musical styles developed; (2) nontechnical musical analysis of the works studied; (3) the reciprocal relationships between African American music and other American musics; and (4) the roles that music plays in our national perceptions of and debates over race. No musical background required. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation A&H and H&S

CROSS REGISTRATION AT WELLESLEY COLLEGE

PRACTICUM IN PEER CONSULTING/WRITING

ENG3602 Practicum in Peer Consulting and Writing (Advanced Liberal Arts) Students learn to act as peer consultants in writing and work on improving their own writing, critical thinking, and interpersonal skills. They accomplish these objectives by addressing their writing problems; writing extensively; developing criteria to evaluate the writings of others; studying various writing processes and theories of composition; examining pedagogical approaches to teaching writing; reading extensively about, and becoming acquainted with, the dynamics of peer tutoring; and working in the Writing Center as peer consultant trainees. Prerequisite: Instructor permission This course may be offered Spring semester.

WRITING POETRY

ENG3604 Writing Poetry (Advanced Liberal Arts) A poet is a maker, an architect of words, spaces, and ideas and seeks expression through the use of various poetic techniques. This course challenges students to make original poetry through the study of contemporary American poetry and poetics. In addition to exploring the creative process through the crafting of poems, students read the poetry and essays of a wide variety of modern poets, work collaboratively to respond to peers' poems, attend poetry readings, and pursue independent study in an area of their own choice. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS) This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

WRITING FICTION

ENG3605 Writing Fiction (Advanced Liberal Arts) Flannery O'Connor said there is "a certain grain of stupidity that the writer of fiction can hardly do without, and this is the quality of having to stare, of not getting the point at once." This class (while not demanding that you cultivate stupidity!) develops and nurtures close attention to how short fiction is made. You will study the art and craft of making short stories. This course emphasizes reading, whereby we will study practitioners of the short story form in order to understand the elements of fiction: character, dialogue, place/setting, plot, and so on. In class, we will take stories apart to see just 'how they tick'. In addition, we will (as pleasure-seekers) look for enjoyment in what we read. By and large, this course runs on writing. You will write short stories of varying lengths, aiming for authority over language, characterization and plot, and authenticity. Your fiction will be closely analyzed by your peers and professor. So you must be a willing, open and active participant, prepared to discuss the work of others, and to reflect on responses to your own work. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS) This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.
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