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“Quabbin Memories; Boston’s Water”─ 75th Commemorative Photo Exhibition Captures Nostalgic Presence Of The Quabbin Reservoir

Celebrations and commemorative events are planned throughout the region, including one very poignant photography exhibit by Babson College Professor James M. Hunt.

2013 marks the 75th anniversary when in 1938 more than 2,500 Swift River Valley residents gave up their homes and their way of life to make way for the construction of the Quabbin Reservoir. The residents of the four farming towns─Enfield, Greenwich, Prescott and Dana─ were displaced through a purchasing process, sometimes fair, sometimes not. Buildings were demolished to the ground level. With very few exceptions, all that was left were cellar holes, foundations, and the ubiquitous stonewalls.

Today, Quabbin is the principal viable and sustained water supply for the city of Boston and other communities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and is recognized as one of the largest drinking-water reservoirs in the world, a remarkable feat of engineering, an "accidental wilderness" that is home to an impressive variety of wildlife, and a place that brings bittersweet memories to many who once lived here.

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Celebrations and commemorative events are planned throughout the region, including one very poignant photography exhibit by Babson College Professor James M. Hunt.

Quabbin Memories; Boston’s Water

Photographs by James M. Hunt

April 22 through June 20, 2013

The Gallery at the Worcester Jewish Community Center 633 Salisbury Street. Worcester, MA 01600 

Opening Reception, May 5, 2013, 3 – 5PM.

The images in this exhibition are not documentary in nature, though they are in fact true to the visual scene there. Hunt captures the personal experience of being there, in this beautiful, natural land that owes its existence to so many and that nurtures so many more.

There are three themes to the exhibition:

• Quabbin Memories─ draws upon the signs, everywhere, but hard to spot, of the communities that called the area home.

• Forest and Water─ was inspired by the compelling and in some ways mysterious and young wilderness that dominates the area.

• The Reservoir─the building of the Reservoir was a significant engineering achievement for its time as man intruded structurally into the landscape. Structures have their own gesture and stand in juxtaposition with the wilderness and the history of the area. It is the blending of all three that create the experience of being in the Quabbin.

Says, Hunt, “This work was supported in part by a Sabbatical Grant from Babson College. I am grateful to Nancy Greenberg, Cultural Arts Director at the Jewish Community Center in Worcester to photographer Ron Rosenstock for their support.”

James M. Hunt is a fine art and environmental photographer in Worcester, Massachusetts and Associate Professor of Management at Babson College in Wellesley, Massachusetts.

James Hunt Photography

Babson College Associate Professor James Hunt

The Friends of the Quabbin

By Barbara Spies Blair | 4/29/2013 12:00 AM