HISTORY & SOCIETY DIVISION FACULTY PROFILES

Blake Pattridge

  • Associate Professor

Dr. Pattridge is an associate professor of history at Babson College where he has taught various iterations of the History and Society Foundation course, as well as intermediate and advanced courses on various topics in Latin American history. Classes taught include Memories, Stories, Histories: Constructing Self in the 20th Century; Latin American History; People and Cultures of the Americas; and Revolution and Terror in Modern Latin America. Dr. Pattridge's research interests include Central American history (especially 19th and 20th-century Guatemala), the history of higher education, and intellectual and religious history. His book, Institution Building and State Formation in Nineteenth Century Latin America: The University of San Carlos, Guatemala, was published by Peter Lang Publishing in 2004. Dr. Pattridge served as President of SECOLAS, the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies, one of the oldest and most prestigious Latin American Studies organizations in the U.S., in 2008-09, and currently serves on the SECOLAS Executive Council.

As a graduate student at Tulane, Dr. Pattridge taught three courses and received a number of grants and fellowships, as well as an award for outstanding undergraduate teaching by graduate students. His scholarly work on nineteenth- and twentieth-century Guatemalan history has been published in a number of leading journals in his field.

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Felix Jimnez Botta

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Frederick Opie

  • Professor

I am a Professor of History and Foodways and the author of several books, a blog, and I host a related podcast. You can find my work at FredOpie.com. My courses examine history through the lens of food. My newest classes developed in 2017 are Food and Civil Rights and Food and Politics. I offer an upper level seminar on Race and Ethnicity in Latin America which explores questions such as: What does it mean to be Black or Indian or white in Latin America?; and How has the explosive growth of export-oriented economies transformed race relations in Latin America? I use a variety of theoretical and inner-disciplinary approaches and case studies in my courses. In my course African History and Foodways students learn about movements and events that have shaped Africa from the 1400s to the present. We cover African culinary contributions to the world; African political institutions, gender, religion, colonization and independence movements. Courses equip students to do quality research, writing, and presentations.

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Holly Walters

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Ian Lapp

  • Senior Lecturer
  • Dean of the Undergraduate School
  • Dean of the Undergraduate School

Ian Lapp is Dean of the Undergraduate School at Babson College. Dr. Lapp is an internationally recognized entrepreneurial leader in education, known for transforming curriculum, pedagogy, and the overall student experience at the undergraduate and graduate level. He joined Babson College in April 2016. Prior to his arrival at Babson, he was an academic leader and faculty member at Harvard University for five years and previously served at Columbia University for 10 years.

Dr. Lapp was recruited to Harvard from Columbia to lead the school of public health’s multi-year educational strategic planning process known as the “Roadmap to 2013,” a school-wide effort to mark its centennial in fall 2013, which included the introduction of four new or redesigned degrees. Dr. Lapp has also led the school of public health’s innovation efforts in technology and interactive learning including HarvardX, e-learning, and simulations.

At the University level, he served as the inaugural co-chair of Harvard’s Teaching and Learning Consortium. At the national level, he has chaired a number of major committees for the Association of Schools & Programs of Public Health (ASPPH) and was a member of the landmark, Framing the Future Taskforce. Dr. Lapp is the president of the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH), which oversees institutional accreditation in public health, and is a member of the board of directors for the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE), which oversees the certification process of professionals in public health. In the international arena, he has worked extensively with public health programs in Africa, Asia, and Europe including playing a key role in the launch of the James P. Grant School of Public Health in Bangladesh.

Dr. Lapp previously served as associate dean for academic affairs and education at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, where he capped off a 10 year career by co-leading the redesign of the school’s MPH degree, the nation’s largest professional master’s degree program in public health. During his tenure at Columbia, he played a collaborative leadership role in the redesign of dozens of courses, including the core courses, development of a number of degree concentrations including global health, launching of an undergraduate program in public health, designing of e-learning projects and high-tech classrooms, and development of an extensive faculty development program in teaching.

Dr. Lapp received a BS degree in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He earned both a MA and PhD in sociology at the Syracuse University Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He also earned a MA in television, radio, and film at the Syracuse University Newhouse School of Communications.

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James Bradford

  • Adjunct Lecturer

James Bradford was awarded the John F. Richards Fellowship from the Afghanistan Institute of Afghanistan Studies to research the history of opium production, use, and trade in Afghanistan. His research led to the publication of his article, "Drug Control in Afghanistan: Culture, Politics, and Power during the 1958 Prohibition of Opium in Badakhshan," in the Journal of Iranian Studies (forthcoming, March 2015). His broader research interests include U.S. foreign policy, the illicit drug trade, and issues related to state building, globalization, and economic development in South Asia and the world. He also teaches classes on the global drug trade, human rights, political and social revolutions, South Asia, and U.S. foreign policy in the world at Berklee College of Music.

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James Hoopes

  • Professor
  • Murata Professor of Ethics in Business

James Hoopes is "Murata Professor of Ethics in Business" at Babson College. His latest book is Corporate Dreams: Big Business in American Democracy from the Great Depression to the Great Recession. The author of half a dozen other books on American history, Hoopes has received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and other funding agencies. His paper, "Managing a Riot," won the Paul Hersey Award for the best paper on leadership at the 2000 meeting of the Academy of Management. He has taught in both Europe and Asia.

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Jennifer Skulte-Ouaiss

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Kandice Hauf

  • Associate Professor

Dr. Hauf has taught at Auburn University and at Wesleyan University in the areas of traditional and modern China. Dr. Hauf's thesis at Yale covered Ming-Quing China (1368-1911). A related minor field was Chinese intellectual history to 1279 A.D. She is a consultant on travel, life, and business in China, Japan, and Taiwan. Dr. Hauf is conversant in Japanese, German, Russian, French, classical and modern Chinese, and Serbo-Croatian.

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Katherine Platt

  • Associate Professor

Dr. Platt has taught at Boston University, Harvard University, and Wellesley College. Her regional specialty is North Africa and the Middle East with a particular focus on labor migration, ritual, and local identity in Tunisia. Her current research concerns transnational migrant and refugee populations.

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Kevin Bruyneel

  • Professor

Kevin Bruyneel is Professor of Politics at Babson College. He wrote The Third Space of Sovereignty: The Postcolonial Politics of U.S.-Indigenous Relations. He presently writes on the relationship between race, colonialism and collective memory. He is writing a book, entitled Settler Memory: The Disavowal of Indigeneity in the Political Life of Race in the United States, which will be published in the Critical Indigeneities Series of the University of North Carolina Press. He has recently published articles in History & Memory, Settler Colonial Studies, Native American and Indigenous Studies Journal, and The Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy. He was born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, the traditional territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. Bruyneel completed his B.A. at Simon Fraser University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. at the New School for Social Research in New York City. At Babson College, Bruyneel teaching courses in Political Theory, American Politics, Critical Race Studies, Indigenous Studies, and Radical Politics. He lives in Somerville, MA.

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Kristen Schmidt

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Lucy McAllister

  • Visiting Assistant Professor
  • Lewis Institute Fellow

Lucy McAllister is a Visiting Assistant Professor and a Lewis Institute Fellow at Babson College. She holds a Ph.D. and a M.Sc. in Environmental Studies from the University of Colorado Boulder, and a B.A. in Environmental Studies and German Studies from Connecticut College.

Dr. McAllister’s research focuses on the relationship between corporations and the natural environment. She has examined topics such as the human and environmental harms of the electronics commodity chain, the social and environmental messaging of lead multinational corporations, and the impacts of technological solutions to climate change on women and children in informal and emerging markets. Her dissertation work was selected for a University of Colorado Dissertation Completion Fellowship and she has also received a Fulbright Teaching Assistant Award. Her research has been published in outlets such as the Harvard Health and Human Rights Journal, The Lancet, Sociology of Development, and the Population Reference Bureau.

Dr. McAllister has taught introductory and advanced courses on Climate Change, Environmental Justice, Food Systems, and Business and the Natural Environment.

In her free time, Lucy enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband Sid, daughter Amelia, and their dog Mr. Rex.

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Marjorie N. Feld

  • Professor

Marjorie N. Feld received her Ph.D. in History at Brandeis University in 2001 and has been at Babson since Fall 2001. Her teaching and research interests include U.S. social, labor, and women's/gender history, along with the history of global human rights movements. She is a member of the Academic Advisory Councils of the Jewish Women's Archive, the American Jewish Historical Society, and Jewish Voice for Peace.

Her first book, Lillian Wald: A Biography, published in 2008 by University of North Carolina Press, won the Saul Viener Book Prize of the American Jewish Historical Society, an award presented biannually to an "outstanding book in American Jewish History." At Babson, she received a Nan Langowitz Women Who Make a Difference award in 2009, the Martin Luther King Leadership Award in 2014, and the Babson Pride Award in 2017. From 2011-2015, she was the faculty director for Babson's Center for Women's Leadership. Her second book, Nations Divided:American Jews and the Struggle Over Apartheid, was published by Palgrave MacMillan in July 2014.

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Mary Godwyn

  • Professor

Professor Godwyn teaches introductory and advanced courses in Sociology, Women's Studies, Gender Studies, and the Nature and Environment Foundation course. She has lectured at Harvard University and taught at Brandeis University and Lasell College, where she was also the Director of the Donahue Institute for Public Values.

Professor Godwyn focuses on social theory as it applies to issues of inequality. Within the field of sociology, her areas of expertise include Critical and Classical theory, Feminist Theory, Ethics and Business Ethics, Diversity and Inclusion, and the Sociology of Entrepreneurship.

She has published in journals such as Symbolic Interaction, Current Perspectives in Social Theory, Gender and Management, and the Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship. In 2008, her business ethics case, Hugh Connerty and Hooters: What is Successful Entrepreneurship? won the Dark Side Case Competition sponsored by the Critical Management Studies Interest Group and the Management Education Division of the Academy of Management. In 2012, Professor Godwyn was given the Nan Langowitz Women Who Make a Difference Award at Babson College, and in 2013, she was the recipient of the Women’s Leadership Award, World Corporate Social Responsibility Congress in Mumbai, India. She has also published three books: Minority Women Entrepreneurs: How Outsider Status can Lead to Better Business Practices, coauthored with Donna Stoddard, DBA (Stanford University Press and Greenleaf Publishing, 2011), Sociology of Organizations: Structures and Relationships co-edited with Jody Hoffer Gittel, PhD (Sage Publications, Inc., 2012) and Ethics and Diversity in Business Management Education: A Sociological Study with International Scope (Springer-Verlag, 2015).

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Nabaparna Ghosh

  • Assistant Professor

Nabaparna Ghosh is an assistant professor of global studies. Her teaching and research interests include modern South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh), empire and colonialism, comparative cities, urban history, postcolonial politics, and economic growth with a focus on environment and sustainability in the global south.

She is currently working on a book manuscript, tentatively titled "Being Urban: Space, Community, and Everyday Life in Colonial Calcutta (1860-1930)." The book goes beyond town plans and maps to explore how kinship ties have configured urban space in South Asia, crafting areas of self-government within colonial town plans.

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Paul Schmitz

  • Lecturer
  • Faculty Director, Babson Undergraduate Semester in San Francisco Program

Paul Schmitz received his Ph.D. in American and New England Studies from Boston University in 2006. He has been a member of the History and Society Division at Babson College since the fall of 2006 and has taught courses on the Modern American City, the History and Culture of American Business, and Immigration and Race. His research focuses on issues of ethnic identity within the Italian and immigrant communities of New York City. Prof. Schmitz also teaches in the Babson Undergraduate Semester in San Francisco Program and serves as the BUS-SF Program's faculty director.

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Perin Gokce

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Stephen Deets

  • Associate Professor
  • Division Chair

Stephen Deets is an Associate Professor at Babson College, teaching courses on international politics, comparative politics, and ethnic conflict as well as classes focusing on specific regions/countries. Before coming to Babson, Stephen Deets taught at Bryn Mawr College, Oberlin College, and Miami University of Ohio.

With a strong background in post-communist democratization, his re-search focuses on a variety of issues related to ethnic politics, particularly notions of justice and institutional forms involved in minority rights pro-tection and representation and how ethnic politics can impact public policy. He has published on East European elections, health care in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Hungarian minorities and social service provision in Lebanon. Currently he is working on a book project on non-territorial autonomy in Europe.

Before receiving his Ph.D., he spent a decade at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, where he was responsible for cooperation with the East European academies, and organized projects on nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism, small business development and entrepreneur-ship, and a host of environmental issues.

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Sudeshna Chatterjee

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Timothy Adivilah

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Xinghua Li

  • Associate Professor

Born and raised in Shanghai, China, Dr. Li received her Bachelor Degree in Advertising from Fudan University and finished her MA and PhD in Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Her research explores the global spread of consumer capitalism through the perspectives of psychoanalysis, ecocriticism, and critical media theory. Her book Environmental Advertising in China and the USA: The Desire to Go Green (Routledge 2016) uses advertising as a lens to analyze the rising phenomenon of green consumerism and compares how the Chinese and American consumer desire for green products are shaped by ideological, cultural, and historical differences. Dr. Li's previous works use psychoanalysis and poststructural theories to explore the relationship between media, desire, and the environment. She has published in journals such as Media, Culture and Society, Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, the anthology Reading Brokeback Mountain, and for three years she authored the "Looking Abroad" Column for The 21st Century, an English-language weekly in Beijing affiliated with the China Daily News Group.

Dr. Li is also working on several other projects. One studies the Chinese tradition of consuming wildlife products such as ivory, rhino horns, and tiger bones and the NGO campaigns intending to stop it. Another examines the psycho-mechanism of eco-jokes in popular culture and explores the potential to increase environmental participation through comedy and humor. Another employs Freud’s notion of the death drive to understand the relations between deadlines and systematized procrastination in modern capitalistic societies. Finally, one studies the digitization of the Chinese language through the computer keyboard and its impacts on literacy and the calligraphic tradition in China.

Finally, Dr. Li is the Founding Member of International Environmental Communication Association, and has been elected as Vice Chair and Conference Planner of the Environmental Communication Division at the International Communication Association from 2016 to 2018.

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Yuliya Rashchupkina

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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