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Course Catalog

The Course Catalog includes course descriptions of all courses offered by the Undergraduate School at Babson College. For descriptions of the courses offered in the current or upcoming semesters, please see the Course Listing.

 

 Undergraduate Course Catalog

 
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Arts & Humanities

AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT (LIT)

LVA2010 African American Literature This course will introduce students to the African American literary tradition starting with the slave narrative and concluding with contemporary literary production. Along the way, we will consider the move from oral to written literatures, the aesthetic forms created and adapted by African American writers, and the role of African American letters in chronicling and shaping the experience of African American people. Our study will be informed by major historical moments —slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Great Migration from south to north, the Civil Rights and post-Civil rights eras—and we will read work by writers such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and (AH & HS) or AHS

AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 AHS Foundation 4 credits THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON IN FALL 2013 OR LATER. AHS Foundation 4 credit foundation liberal arts The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

ART IN THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY

VSA3610 (formerly VSA3672) The End of Certainty: Early 20th Century Art (Advanced Liberal Arts) Between 1900 -1938, artists grappled with; the discovery of the subconscious, Einstein's physics, a war of unprecedented scope and destructiveness that was followed by the collapse of social and economic order. Styles such as Symbolism, Cubism, Futurism, Expressivism, Dada and Surrealism were created by artists responding to enormous changes in established ways of thinking and being that marked the beginning of the 20th century. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS) This course may be offered in Fall or Spring semester.

CROSS REGISTRATION AT OLIN COLLEGE

CROSS REGISTRATION AT OLIN COLLGE

CROSS REGISTRATION AT WELLESLEY

CROSS REGISTRATION AT WELLESLEY COLLEGE

DESIGN FOR LIVING (VSA)

LVA2475 Design for Living 4 credit intermediate liberal arts Explores how profoundly our lives are shaped by the designs of graphics we see, objects we use and buildings we move through every day. Students will gain increased understanding of the role good and bad design plays in affecting them and in shaping the world in which they live. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and (AHF and HSF) or AHS

DETECTIVE FICTION,NOIR,SOC CRITICISM(LIT

LVA2072 Detective Fiction, Noir, and Social Criticism 4 credit intermediate liberal arts This course explores the uses and genre development of detective fiction and film noir and their functions as social commentary, applying examples from different times and places - in the United States, Latin America, and Europe. What do these works have in common, and what separates them? How do they reflect or interrogate the cultures that produced them? Why has detective fiction (in its various incarnations) remained so popular? We consider revisions of the genre in the so-called “hardboiled” or serial “pulp fiction” of the 1930s and 1940s, as well as its representation in film noir. We analyze later versions of the genre through films such as Chinatown and Blade Runner, and recent alterations in neo-noir films, evaluating them in relation to contemporary culture. Short works by canonical Latin American authors such as Borges and García Márquez, among others, provide an introduction to Latin American crime fiction. Through the works of current and popular writers and filmmakers we consider the legacies of dictatorship in Spain and Latin America, and the genre’s use in investigating and exposing a conflictive past (or fear of what one might find). We will look at the female detective in varied works. How is she different (if she is?) from her male counterparts? And we examine how detective fiction can function to parody or subvert the possibility of an ordered solution, or the completion of justice. Prerequisites: RHT I & II & (AHF & HSF) or AHS

ELEMENTARY CHINESE LANGUAGE I

CHN1210 Elementary Chinese Language I (General Credit) An introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively. Prerequisite: None This course is typically offered Fall semester.

ELEMENTARY JAPANESE LANG & CULT I

JPN1200 Elementary Japanese Language and Culture I (General Credit) An introduction to a practical, and functional knowledge of Japanese as it is used in contemporary society. Students will learn the fundamental use of the Japanese language by exercising all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Two basic writing systems, hiragana and katakana, are taught to promote literacy in Japanese environments. An introduction to Japanese culture, which is inseparable from learning the language, is provided through demonstrations, videos and films. Prerequisite: None This course is typically offered in the following semester: Fall

ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

SPN1200 Elementary Spanish I Elementary Spanish I is a fast-paced introductory course which prepares students for Elementary Spanish II in the subsequent semester. Through engaging, meaningful activities that develop real-world skills and abilities, the course integrates a wide variety of interactive materials to put language into practice. Elementary Spanish I is the first course in the Proficiency Sequence, a program of study designed to bring students to proficiency in 4 semesters. The course invites true beginners, as well as students that have had some prior introduction to Spanish but are not yet prepared for intermediate level work. Emphasis is on building oral and written communication skills and acquiring a greater awareness of the Hispanic world.

ETHICS (PHL)

CVA2001 Introduction to Ethics 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Discussions relate morality to the life and circumstances of contemporary society by offering a solid grounding in the major concepts of ethical theory and in the basic skills for analyzing ethical issues and making sound moral judgments. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Fall and Spring semesters.

EXISTENTIALISM

PHL3607 Existentialism (Advanced Liberal Arts) Existentialism is a philosophical movement loosely held together by sensitivity to the paradoxes and ambiguities of human experience. With a common emphasis on the tension between freedom and the power of circumstance, existentialists tend to view life from the standpoint of the challenges facing the construction of individual and intersubjective identity. Some existentialists are deeply religious, while others are fervently atheistic. All, however, emphasize the significance of the situated nature of freedom, which translates into a philosophy of responsibility and engagement with the world. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS) This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.

FRENCH 3600:CINEMA, CULTURE,CONVERSATION

FRN3600 Advanced French 3600: Cinema, Culture, Conversation Course Description: This course is designed as an advanced-level conversation class, with a strong cultural component. The major course materials are French films and supplementary readings. These films and readings serve as the basis for debate, discussion and written analysis of issues relevant to the history, culture and politics of France and the francophone world of North Africa and the Caribbean, with a focus on global issues of social concern. This course is designed for students who have mastered the grammatical structures of French, although there will be review of grammar as needed. Films will be on reserve at Horn Library, and screenings will be scheduled. Prerequisites: FRN 2601 Intermediate French II at Babson, or equivalent proficiency as demonstrated through a required placement test. This course is not open to native speakers.

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACTING AND IMPROV

PRF1110 Fundamentals of Acting and Improvisation 4 credit, general credit In this course students will gain an understanding of the methods and tools required for performance. Through various exercises, theater games, improvisation, and assignments students will create characters, learn theater terminology and various methods of acting, and attempt to find not only meaning but also the theatrical power of dramatic literature. Most importantly, students will develop the confidence to approach the craft of acting with discipline and success. Prerequisites, None

GLOBAL CINEMA (FLM)

LVA2013 Global Cinema (4 credit Intermediate Liberal Arts) Global Cinema provides an overview of the history and aesthetics of films from Europe, Asia, Africa, and South America. Students will analyze films as cultural artifacts, tied to and influenced by the cultures that give rise to them. Weekly film screenings will be complemented by readings in the history and theory of various national cinemas. ALL FILMS ARE IN THEIR ORIGINAL LANGUAGE WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

HNRS AHS FOUNDATION

AHS1000 AHS Foundation 4 credits THIS COURSE IS FOR STUDENTS WHO STARTED AT BABSON IN FALL 2013 OR LATER. AHS Foundation 4 credit foundation liberal arts The Arts and Humanities / History and Society Foundation (AHS) engages a combination of perspectives, including aesthetic, ethical, historical and societal, to explore a particular topic or theme. Exploring a topic such as nature, justice, or memory, for example, through a rich array of perspectives aims to develop the ability to see that all interpretations are impacted by the context, values, and attitudes of the interpreter—including, of course, our own. We use course materials from a range of media and genres to explore the topic and learn to use complexity and ambiguity to enrich and deepen our inquiry. This theme-based course aims to establish a foundation of skills that anticipate the more disciplinary and interdisciplinary analytical skills that are introduced at the Intermediate Level of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Prerequisites: None

IMAGINING SUSTAINABILITY (INTDIS)

CVA2457 Imagining Sustainability: Nature, Humanity, Business and the End of Sorrow 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The primary focus of this course is on the exploration of the concept of sustainability as a juncture of economic, environmental and social concerns. With the rapid expansion of globalization, and the attenuating crises that accompany it, with regard to these concerns, future business and public policy leaders will need to be in the vanguard at determining how best to effect solutions. To that end, this course will examine a variety of sources in the consideration both of what allows for the implementation of sustainability and what prohibits it--from business case study to philosophical/economic analysis to literary memoir. Within this context, students will be invited to examine what we mean when we talk about "justice," "ethics," "profit," "growth," and "community." In sum, we will explore how concepts that contribute to our understanding of individual and communal responsibility might be revisited and redefined in the effort to create a world that offers sustainable economic opportunity for all, ensured within a vital commitment to environmental stewardship. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation (H&S and A&H) or AHS This course may be offered Spring or a Summer semester.

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

FRN2600 Intermediate French Language and Culture I (Advanced Liberal Arts) Active use of contemporary spoken and written French through dialog practice, oral presentations, class discussions, and written exercises. By becoming more aware of the French speaking world and the relationship between culture and language, students increase their ability to communicate in international environments. The program features web-based audio and video interaction with native speakers. Prerequisite: FRN1200 (Equivalent of one year of college French as demonstrated through a required placement test) This course is typically offered in the Fall.
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