MOB3526 Values Based Entrepreneurial Leadership
4 Advanced Management Credits

This course has been created specifically for students who wish to develop their capability as a values based entrepreneurial leader. Specifically, the course is about helping students to better understand and develop their own values and learn how effectively apply those values as a leader. Being a successful entrepreneurial leader requires a clear set of values and a willingness to allow those values to govern decision-making beyond simple decision rubrics like profit maximization.

For more information: http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/0l0yj

Prerequisites: (FME1000 and FME1001) or (EPS1000 and MOB1010)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Management
  • Level: Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MOB3526
  • Number of Credits: 4

EPS4521 Venture Growth Strategies
4 General Credits
The course focuses on the opportunities and challenges involved in the management of growth in entrepreneurial settings, either in an individual company or as part of a larger corporation. Growth is the ultimate resource constrainer, stretching all systems in a company to the limit and often beyond. Consequently, this course will emphasize management _at the limit_ of what students may have already learned in other functional courses. It will provide students with a series of frameworks, analytical skills and techniques, and decision-making tools that can be used in growing entrepreneurial businesses.

The course relies on non-traditional, experiential learning methods in addition to the usual case-based method. While some classroom meetings will include case discussions involving growth-related issues, other classroom meetings will involve computer-based simulation exercises which are used by leading companies worldwide as an innovative training tool because of the rich experience it provides to participants. Guest speakers will provide further insight into the opportunities and challenges of growth.

The course is particularly useful to students who have interests in one or more of the following areas: (1) growing their own entrepreneurial companies, (2) managing the growth of existing companies in an entrepreneurial fashion by emphasizing innovation and opportunity capture in a dynamic environment, and/or (3) helping companies manage their growth through consulting assignments.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring


Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Entrepreneurship
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: EPS4521
  • Number of Credits: 4

EPS7575 Venture Growth Strategies
3 Elective Credits
The course focuses on the opportunities and challenges involved in the management of growth in entrepreneurial settings, either in an individual company or as part of a larger corporation. Growth is the ultimate resource constrainer, stretching all systems in a company to the limit and often beyond. Consequently, this course will emphasize management _at the limit_ of what students may have already learned in other functional courses. It will provide students with a series of frameworks, analytical skills and techniques, and decision-making tools that can be used in growing entrepreneurial businesses.

The course relies on non-traditional, experiential learning methods in addition to the usual case-based method. While some classroom meetings will include case discussions involving growth-related issues, other classroom meetings will involve computer-based simulation exercises which are used by leading companies worldwide as an innovative training tool because of the rich experience it provides to participants. Guest speakers will provide further insight into the opportunities and challenges of growth.

The course is particularly useful to students who have interests in one or more of the following areas: (1) growing their own entrepreneurial companies, (2) managing the growth of existing companies in an entrepreneurial fashion by emphasizing innovation and opportunity capture in a dynamic environment, and/or (3) helping companies manage their growth through consulting assignments.

This course is typically offered in the following semester: Spring


Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Entrepreneurship
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: EPS7575
  • Number of Credits: 3

LTA2016 Violence: Theories of Cruelty, Evil, and the Inhuman
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This course will investigate the idea of violence across an extensive spectrum of authors, texts, films, and literary-philosophical perspectives from the East and the West. We seek not merely to engage in a conventional critique but to exceed the boundaries of our embedded understanding by also contemplating this concept's fascinating potential as a form of literary imagination and intellectual expression. Topics will therefore include cruelty, vulnerability, power, betrayal, destruction, vengeance, anger, terror, defacement, pain, disaster, and inhumanity. From the poetics of torture to the damaged writings of war, from theoretical works on catastrophe to cinematic and artistic pieces on the nature of evil, the intent is to explore the many narratives that have emerged across the global horizon in the face of an often violent experience of the modern world.


Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2016
  • Number of Credits: 4

MBA7546 Wealth Management
3 Blended Credits
Wealth management does not necessarily have as much to do with how much asset value you now have or how you accumulated that wealth. But wealth management is more about how you manage the wealth you have. There is an accumulation stage and a distribution stage. Wealth management does not involve just investing. Investing is an important element but good management also involves income taxes, estate taxes, how to fund education for children, how to fund a retirement, and how to protect your assets from creditors.

There are 6 pillars of wealth management. This course examines tax planning, estate planning, investment planning, retirement planning, education planning, and risk management including asset protection and insurance, from an individual planning perspective. The course is designed for students who have already accumulated wealth or are in the process of doing so. This could be the successful entrepreneur (or in the process of becoming successful) but also includes students who expect to inherit wealth and those that are interested in helping parents manage their wealth. Also students who have interest in the financial services industry - financial advisors, insurance advisors, bankers, mutual fund managers, etc. will find the course of interest.


The course will use a combination of cases, readings, power point presentations, spread sheet models, and discussions amongst students. Since many of the topics change quickly (for example expiration of the Bush tax cuts and the fiscal cliff legislation known as The American Tax Relief Act of 2012) there will also be cutting edge updates (for example the Affordable Care Act) to planning techniques.

The course is offered in a blended learning format. Thus the course is about 7 weeks long with two face to face sessions. The text will be supplemented with numerous articles which are very practical in nature. Although not a guarantee past students have learned how to save on income and estate taxes!

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MBA7546
  • Number of Credits: 3

MBA9520 Wealth Management Part 1 - Tax, Estate, and Investment Planning
1.5 Intensive Elective Credits
There are 6 pillars of wealth management - tax planning, estate planning, investment planning, retirement planning, education planning, and risk management (asset protection and insurance).
Part 1 examines tax planning - an overview of the income tax system, capital gains, alternative minimum tax, Roth conversion, charitable gifting techniques, and the latest on the Bush tax cuts. Then estate planning covers an overview of the estate and gift tax, standard estate planning documents you need, use of trusts, life insurance in estate planning, and advanced techniques. Finally, investment planning starts with basic investment objectives, then modern portfolio theory is covered including expected returns, measures of investment risk, the degree of correlation among investments and asset classes, and the concept of the efficient frontier. Specific types of investments are discussed such as mutual funds, commodities, TIPS, stocks, fixed income, real estate, gold, and exchange traded funds. Asset allocation, inflation, annuity investing, and specific decisions such as leasing versus buying are also covered.

Part 1 covers the topics from an individual planning perspective. The course is designed for students who have already accumulated wealth or are in the process of doing so. This could be the successful entrepreneur (or in the process of becoming successful) but also includes students who expect to inherit wealth and those that are interested in helping parents manage their wealth. Also, students who have interest in the financial services industry - financial advisors, insurance advisors, bankers, mutual fund managers, etc. will find the course of interest.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: MBA9520
  • Number of Credits: 1.5

OIM3690 Web Technologies

4 Advanced Liberal Arts Elective Credits

**Students who took this course as MIS3690 cannot register for this course**

OIM3690 introduces students to web site development. Students will learn general design and programming skills that are needed for web site development. Students will explore languages and tools of the world wide web (WWW), including the hyper-text markup (HTML), cascading style sheet (CSS), and JavaScript languages. Some related design concepts are also discussed, in addition to aspects concerning design methodology and project management. As part of the course requirements, each student will publish a website to a hosting service, which charges a hosting service and domain registration fee of $30-40. (Students will be responsible to pay this fee separate from the tuition charges during the term.)" The various tools may include FrontPage, text editors, and graphics design editors. This course emphasizes hands-on computer skill development in a computer lab setting.

Prerequisites: SME2012 or OIM2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: OIM3690
  • Number of Credits: 4

SEN1343 When in Rome: Arts, Literature, and History of Ancient Rome

(Student Instructor: Richard Gwinn) The arts, literature, and history of the Roman Empire are still vibrant in American political institutions, culture, and media. This course seeks to give the history of Roman society, from 753 BCE to 476 CE, a thorough examination. Each section of the course (Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic, and Roman Empire) will analyze primary sources of art and literature produced in the given era. We will read poetry, study battles, and learn about architecture, among other things. Immerse yourself in Roman history without worrying about homework or essays!

Wednesdays 6:30 - 9:00 pm

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1343
  • Number of Credits: 0

HIS4682 Women in China
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Course considers Chinese history through an emphasis on the social and cultural roles of Chinese women and their changing role over time. Topics include women and the family, and women as shamans, prostitutes, nuns, rulers, writers, revolutionaries, and politicians. Close attention is given to the social-historical context, regional class, and ethnic differences in order to counter the common misconception that pre-modern China is an unchanging monolith. Through this approach and concentration on the roles of women, students gain a more realistic understanding of traditional Chinese society and of the complex legacy of the pre-Communist past in contemporary China.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: 3 intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HIS4682
  • Number of Credits: 4

FLM4610 Work, Play and Adulthood in American Movies
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
What constitutes the good life? How do we define success? What happens when individuals' definitions of success collide with broad-based cultural assumptions about achievement and happiness? What are the markers of adulthood? What's gained and what's lost once childhood and adolescence end? From the silent film era to the present, American movies have examined such questions along with our collective attitudes toward work, leisure, and pleasure. In this film history course, we will view movies from across the decades and read works of social theory, history and philosophy in an effort to understand how popular culture narratives have framed -- and sometimes challenged -- those attitudes. The course will be run as a seminar with students responsible for preparing and leading class discussion each week. Coursework will include weekly reading and film viewing, oral presentations, papers and tests.

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FLM4610
  • Number of Credits: 4