MOB3526 Values Based Entrepreneurial Leadership
4 Advanced Management Credits

This course has been created specifically for students who wish to develop their capability as a values based entrepreneurial leader. Specifically, the course is about helping students to better understand and develop their own values and learn how effectively apply those values as a leader. Being a successful entrepreneurial leader requires a clear set of values and a willingness to allow those values to govern decision-making beyond simple decision rubrics like profit maximization.

For more information: http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/0l0yj

Prerequisites: (FME1000 and FME1001) or (EPS1000 and MOB1010)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Management
  • Level: Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MOB3526
  • Number of Credits: 4

LTA2016 Violence: Theories of Cruelty, Evil, and the Inhuman
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This course will investigate the idea of violence across an extensive spectrum of authors, texts, films, and literary-philosophical perspectives from the East and the West. We seek not merely to engage in a conventional critique but to exceed the boundaries of our embedded understanding by also contemplating this concept's fascinating potential as a form of literary imagination and intellectual expression. Topics will therefore include cruelty, vulnerability, power, betrayal, destruction, vengeance, anger, terror, defacement, pain, disaster, and inhumanity. From the poetics of torture to the damaged writings of war, from theoretical works on catastrophe to cinematic and artistic pieces on the nature of evil, the intent is to explore the many narratives that have emerged across the global horizon in the face of an often violent experience of the modern world.


Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2016
  • Number of Credits: 4

HIS4610 Virtuous Capitalism in Malaysia and Thailand

(FormerlynSocial Responsibility in Malaysia & Thailand)
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Elective Abroad Credits
Program fee and group international airfare is paid to Glavin Office - program fee includes accommodations, breakfast, group flights (2), airport transports, ground transportation, site visits, program planned meals, and cultural excursions. Not included: tuition, visa costs, additional meals and personal expenses.

The purpose of our course is to explore the question: "How do Malaysians and Thais think about 'Social Responsibility' and how do they act in order to achieve it?" By extension, we will be asking about how approaches to business ethics in our own countries differ from Malaysians' and Thais'? Often in Western discussions of business ethics, it is assumed that the West is far ahead of Asia in business ethics. We will make no such assumption, but rather, we will ask if Malaysia and Thailand have anything to teach our countries.

More particularly, we will focus on three Asian faiths and cultural traditions - Islam, Buddhism, and Confucianism. We will visit 3 socially responsible companies, each representing, respectively, an approach to social responsibility consistent with one of those 3 traditions. We will aim not only to learn about the implications of Islam, Buddhism, and Confucianism for business ethics. We will also aim to understand what qualities those 3 Asian traditions share which may distinguish them generally from Western traditions in business ethics.

Prerequisites: Any combination of 2 ILA (HSS, LTA, CSP, LVA, CVA)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HIS4610
  • Number of Credits: 4

MBA7546 Wealth Management
3 Blended Credits
Wealth management does not necessarily have as much to do with how much asset value you now have or how you accumulated that wealth. But wealth management is more about how you manage the wealth you have. There is an accumulation stage and a distribution stage. Wealth management does not involve just investing. Investing is an important element but good management also involves income taxes, estate taxes, how to fund education for children, how to fund a retirement, and how to protect your assets from creditors.

There are 6 pillars of wealth management. This course examines tax planning, estate planning, investment planning, retirement planning, education planning, and risk management including asset protection and insurance, from an individual planning perspective. The course is designed for students who have already accumulated wealth or are in the process of doing so. This could be the successful entrepreneur (or in the process of becoming successful) but also includes students who expect to inherit wealth and those that are interested in helping parents manage their wealth. Also students who have interest in the financial services industry - financial advisors, insurance advisors, bankers, mutual fund managers, etc. will find the course of interest.


The course will use a combination of cases, readings, power point presentations, spread sheet models, and discussions amongst students. Since many of the topics change quickly (for example expiration of the Bush tax cuts and the fiscal cliff legislation known as The American Tax Relief Act of 2012) there will also be cutting edge updates (for example the Affordable Care Act) to planning techniques.

The course is offered in a blended learning format. Thus the course is about 7 weeks long with two face to face sessions. The text will be supplemented with numerous articles which are very practical in nature. Although not a guarantee past students have learned how to save on income and estate taxes!

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MBA7546
  • Number of Credits: 3

OIM3690 Web Technologies

4 Advanced Liberal Arts Elective Credits

Students who took this course as MIS3690 cannot register for this course

OIM3690 introduces students to web site development. Students will learn general design and programming skills that are needed for web site development. Students will explore languages and tools of the world wide web (WWW), including the hyper-text markup (HTML), cascading style sheet (CSS), and JavaScript languages. Some related design concepts are also discussed, in addition to aspects concerning design methodology and project management. As part of the course requirements, each student will publish a website to a hosting service, which charges a hosting service and domain registration fee of $30-40. (Students will be responsible to pay this fee separate from the tuition charges during the term.)" The various tools may include FrontPage, text editors, and graphics design editors. This course emphasizes hands-on computer skill development in a computer lab setting.

Prerequisites: SME2012 or OIM2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: OIM3690
  • Number of Credits: 4

HUM4606 What Does it Mean to Live a Good Life?

4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

This advanced liberal arts elective investigates what it might mean to live a 'good life', and how these interpretations might contribute to your own discoveries and thinking as you head out into the 'real world' beyond Babson. Rather than a philosophy or psychology or self-help course (although all of this is intertwined), this course is based around how writers and filmmakers and other creative thinkers have tried to explore this enduring focus of human inquiry. Through a wide range of literature, film, podcasts, and other media, we will examine differing efforts to perceive and live out a 'good life.' How can we define and measure happiness, and whether that should even be our ultimate goal? How important are extrinsic rewards like achievement and money compared to more internal ones like relationships and human connection? How do we avoid being overwhelmed by the news of the world and instead to create stories that matter and move us to positive action? Where can we find value in odysseys and unexpected detours? What is the meaning of work and its relationship to play? How can we better approach mortality and loss? And how can we grasp the simultaneous individuality and immensity of the human condition in ways that strive to make ourselves and the world better? Together, we will wrangle with these and other ongoing life questions.


Prerequisites: Any combination of 2 ILA (HSS, LTA, CSP, LVA, CVA)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HUM4606
  • Number of Credits: 4

SEN1343​ When in Rome: Arts, Literature, and History of Ancient Rome

(Student Instructor: Richard Gwinn) The arts, literature, and history of the Roman Empire are still vibrant in American political institutions, culture, and media. This course seeks to give the history of Roman society, from 753 BCE to 476 CE, a thorough examination. Each section of the course (Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic, and Roman Empire) will analyze primary sources of art and literature produced in the given era. We will read poetry, study battles, and learn about architecture, among other things. Immerse yourself in Roman history without worrying about homework or essays!

Wednesdays 6:30 - 9:00 pm

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1343
  • Number of Credits: 0

HIS4682 Women in China
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Course considers Chinese history through an emphasis on the social and cultural roles of Chinese women and their changing role over time. Topics include women and the family, and women as shamans, prostitutes, nuns, rulers, writers, revolutionaries, and politicians. Close attention is given to the social-historical context, regional class, and ethnic differences in order to counter the common misconception that pre-modern China is an unchanging monolith. Through this approach and concentration on the roles of women, students gain a more realistic understanding of traditional Chinese society and of the complex legacy of the pre-Communist past in contemporary China.

Prerequisites: Any combination of 2 ILA (HSS, LTA, CSP, LVA, CVA)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HIS4682
  • Number of Credits: 4

WRT1001 Writing Across Contexts
4 Foundation Liberal Arts Credits

This course introduces students to key concepts in meaning-making and helps them develop rhetorically sophisticated approaches to reading, writing, and composing across contexts. Students refine and reflect on their own composing practices and processes past, present, and future as they read, analyze, and create texts for a wide variety of audiences, purposes, and media forms. At the end of the term and with the vocabulary developed in the course, each student articulates in an essay their own working theory of and approach to writing that they can mobilize and adapt for future academic and professional contexts.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Foundation Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: WRT1001
  • Number of Credits: 4

ENG4620 Writing Creative Non-Fiction
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
In this class, you will have the chance to write about moments in your life, and passionate interests, you wish to deeply explore. You will "read like a writer" to learn the elements and forms of creative nonfiction, including memoir, contemplative, nature, and travel essays. We will read creative nonfiction by such writers as Virginia Woolf, Zadie Smith, and David Foster Wallace, and consider both what the writers say and how they say it. You will write your own personal essays, developing your facility with such elements as conflict, persona, and character development, and, by sharing your work with peers, you will gain a critical understanding of your own writing. You will find, like creative nonfiction writer Dinty Moore, that "the happy by-product" of exploring, expressing the previously unspoken, "is that one has a richer life."


Prerequisites: Any combination of 2 ILA (HSS, LTA, CSP, LVA, CVA)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: ENG4620
  • Number of Credits: 4