OIM7529 Sustainability Innovation
1.5 Elective Credits

**Students who took this as MOB7529 cannot register for this course.**

Our economic systems are running on an enormous ecological deficit. However, there's some good news for entrepreneurial leaders everywhere; everything needs to be redesigned. What you get when you have new technologies, new user needs, new markets, and new business plans is new opportunities for sustainable development. With this mindset, the industrial and economic systems are in sustainability transformation from the industrial age to the climate change and social impact age.

In this new age, entrepreneurial leaders must understand the socio-ecological impacts of their businesses, and integrate sustainability risks and opportunities into discussions and decisions on risk, revenue, and business strategy. They must explore and develop innovations with sustainability priorities for their markets and industries. They must be able to evaluate value and impact at scale in the context of short- and long-term strategic decision making. Otherwise, their businesses will be inevitably extinct in the climate change and social impact age.

This course aims to prepare entrepreneurial leaders for critical sustainability transformation. Students will gain knowledge about the sustainability challenges (e.g., energy, transportation, waste, carbon management, agriculture, production and consumption) and practical skills for exploring sustainability innovations and accelerating the growth of sustainable businesses (e.g, net zero, zero-carbon tech, decarbonization, ESG, UN SDG). Students will 1) learn and employ integrated systems thinking to address social responsibility, ecological integrity, and value creation; 2) apply an innovation process framework to generate sustainability ideas and develop business strategies; and 3) assess the suitability, scalability, and sustainability of innovations for consumers/users, investors, and other stakeholders of interest.

Students who are interested in any of the following roles may find this course useful:

  • An entrepreneur wanting to understand sustainability as a business opportunity
  • An individual or corporate strategy group developing a sustainability strategy
  • An individual or corporate strategy group seeking growth through sustainability innovations
  • A leader wanting to develop a culture of sustainability and organizational change
  • An R&D group aiming to integrate sustainability into its innovation process
  • A financier deciding whether to invest in a sustainability-oriented entrepreneur

Prerequisite: NONE

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: OIM7529
  • Number of Credits: 1.5

MBA7504 Systems Dynamics in Business, Society and the Environment
3 Elective Credits

Whether within smaller business organizations we lead and manage, or across extended global
enterprises so critical to our venture's success, or the hyperconnected societies in which we live, other environment engulfing us and our shared resources, a common element is the prevalence of
interconnected "systems" - complex networks of parameters, actors, decisions, actions, and states (of variables; not nations). The systems feature exogenous inputs and endogenous relationships, transformations, flows, and feedback loops - all playing out over time and, by so doing, making the systems dynamic. It's just the way the world is: webs within webs of dynamic systems with all sorts of intended and unintended convergence, divergence, equilibria, disequilibria, resilience, fragility, and, yes, so-called butterfly effects.

And then, there are "us": biased, compartmentalized, bounded, and myopic in mindsets,
timeframes, choices, and ability to think through connections and second-, third-, and higher-order effects. The course on "System Dynamics in Business, Society, and the Environment" is intended to break through these very human traits and constraints.

Specifically, the course will:

(1) introduce systems and systems thinking;
(2) immerse the learner in the schematic mapping, analytical modeling, and quantitative as well as managerial analysis of dynamic systems in business, society, and the environment;
(3) introduce the notion of the "three singularities" (possibly existentially threatening disruptions in the areas of computational, life, and environmental sciences) and explore the consequent system dynamics for business, society, and the environment; and
(4) conclude with lessons for citizens, managers, policymakers, and leaders.

Prerequisites: Completed 12 credits of core requirements

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: MSBA Elective (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MBA7504
  • Number of Credits: 3

MOB7515 Talent Management: What Many Leaders Miss

(Formerly Human Resources for High Performance)
3 Credits
The ability to manage people effectively provides a distinct competitive advantage for organizations. This course is for managers and current or future entrepreneurs who hope to capitalize on the connection between managing people and superior organizational performance, competitive advantage, profitability, and growth. This course will help you develop a conceptual understanding of organizational practices, strategies and tools that enable the most effective management of an organization's human resources. The course is designed to answer the following fundamental question: What do managers and entrepreneurs need to know about human resources for organizational success?

For more information: http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/inlmu


Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Management
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MOB7515
  • Number of Credits: 3

OPS7200 Technology & Operations Management

2 CreditsTechnology & Operations Management (TOM) - This course introduces students to the fundamental components of a firm's operating systems, be it a mature enterprise or an early stage company. The course introduces the new methods and models to analyze, diagnose and improve operations activities for both manufacturing and service firms. We examine key issues for competitiveness including operations strategy, innovation, product and process design and development, global supply chain management, quality management, and sustainable operations. Developing a strong appreciation for the contribution of technology and operations to a company's market success is an essential element of effective decision-making for entrepreneurs and leaders of all types of organizations.

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Course Number: OPS7200
  • Number of Credits: 2

EPS7575 Venture Growth Strategies
3 Elective Credits
The course focuses on the opportunities and challenges involved in the management of growth in entrepreneurial settings, either in an individual company or as part of a larger corporation. Growth is the ultimate resource constrainer, stretching all systems in a company to the limit and often beyond. Consequently, this course will emphasize management _at the limit_ of what students may have already learned in other functional courses. It will provide students with a series of frameworks, analytical skills and techniques, and decision-making tools that can be used in growing entrepreneurial businesses.

The course relies on non-traditional, experiential learning methods in addition to the usual case-based method. While some classroom meetings will include case discussions involving growth-related issues, other classroom meetings will involve computer-based simulation exercises which are used by leading companies worldwide as an innovative training tool because of the rich experience it provides to participants. Guest speakers will provide further insight into the opportunities and challenges of growth.

The course is particularly useful to students who have interests in one or more of the following areas: (1) growing their own entrepreneurial companies, (2) managing the growth of existing companies in an entrepreneurial fashion by emphasizing innovation and opportunity capture in a dynamic environment, and/or (3) helping companies manage their growth through consulting assignments.

This course is typically offered in the following semester: Spring


Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Entrepreneurship
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: EPS7575
  • Number of Credits: 3

MBA7546 Wealth Management
3 Blended Credits
Wealth management does not necessarily have as much to do with how much asset value you now have or how you accumulated that wealth. But wealth management is more about how you manage the wealth you have. There is an accumulation stage and a distribution stage. Wealth management does not involve just investing. Investing is an important element but good management also involves income taxes, estate taxes, how to fund education for children, how to fund a retirement, and how to protect your assets from creditors.

There are 6 pillars of wealth management. This course examines tax planning, estate planning, investment planning, retirement planning, education planning, and risk management including asset protection and insurance, from an individual planning perspective. The course is designed for students who have already accumulated wealth or are in the process of doing so. This could be the successful entrepreneur (or in the process of becoming successful) but also includes students who expect to inherit wealth and those that are interested in helping parents manage their wealth. Also students who have interest in the financial services industry - financial advisors, insurance advisors, bankers, mutual fund managers, etc. will find the course of interest.


The course will use a combination of cases, readings, power point presentations, spread sheet models, and discussions amongst students. Since many of the topics change quickly (for example expiration of the Bush tax cuts and the fiscal cliff legislation known as The American Tax Relief Act of 2012) there will also be cutting edge updates (for example the Affordable Care Act) to planning techniques.

The course is offered in a blended learning format. Thus the course is about 7 weeks long with two face to face sessions. The text will be supplemented with numerous articles which are very practical in nature. Although not a guarantee past students have learned how to save on income and estate taxes!

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MBA7546
  • Number of Credits: 3

MBA9520 Wealth Management Part 1 - Tax, Estate, and Investment Planning
1.5 Intensive Elective Credits
There are 6 pillars of wealth management - tax planning, estate planning, investment planning, retirement planning, education planning, and risk management (asset protection and insurance).
Part 1 examines tax planning - an overview of the income tax system, capital gains, alternative minimum tax, Roth conversion, charitable gifting techniques, and the latest on the Bush tax cuts. Then estate planning covers an overview of the estate and gift tax, standard estate planning documents you need, use of trusts, life insurance in estate planning, and advanced techniques. Finally, investment planning starts with basic investment objectives, then modern portfolio theory is covered including expected returns, measures of investment risk, the degree of correlation among investments and asset classes, and the concept of the efficient frontier. Specific types of investments are discussed such as mutual funds, commodities, TIPS, stocks, fixed income, real estate, gold, and exchange traded funds. Asset allocation, inflation, annuity investing, and specific decisions such as leasing versus buying are also covered.

Part 1 covers the topics from an individual planning perspective. The course is designed for students who have already accumulated wealth or are in the process of doing so. This could be the successful entrepreneur (or in the process of becoming successful) but also includes students who expect to inherit wealth and those that are interested in helping parents manage their wealth. Also, students who have interest in the financial services industry - financial advisors, insurance advisors, bankers, mutual fund managers, etc. will find the course of interest.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: MBA9520
  • Number of Credits: 1.5