SEN1343 When in Rome: Arts, Literature, and History of Ancient Rome

(Student Instructor: Richard Gwinn) The arts, literature, and history of the Roman Empire are still vibrant in American political institutions, culture, and media. This course seeks to give the history of Roman society, from 753 BCE to 476 CE, a thorough examination. Each section of the course (Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic, and Roman Empire) will analyze primary sources of art and literature produced in the given era. We will read poetry, study battles, and learn about architecture, among other things. Immerse yourself in Roman history without worrying about homework or essays!

Wednesdays 6:30 - 9:00 pm

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1343
  • Number of Credits: 0

HIS4682 Women in China
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Course considers Chinese history through an emphasis on the social and cultural roles of Chinese women and their changing role over time. Topics include women and the family, and women as shamans, prostitutes, nuns, rulers, writers, revolutionaries, and politicians. Close attention is given to the social-historical context, regional class, and ethnic differences in order to counter the common misconception that pre-modern China is an unchanging monolith. Through this approach and concentration on the roles of women, students gain a more realistic understanding of traditional Chinese society and of the complex legacy of the pre-Communist past in contemporary China.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: 3 intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HIS4682
  • Number of Credits: 4

FLM4610 Work, Play and Adulthood in American Movies
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
What constitutes the good life? How do we define success? What happens when individuals' definitions of success collide with broad-based cultural assumptions about achievement and happiness? What are the markers of adulthood? What's gained and what's lost once childhood and adolescence end? From the silent film era to the present, American movies have examined such questions along with our collective attitudes toward work, leisure, and pleasure. In this film history course, we will view movies from across the decades and read works of social theory, history and philosophy in an effort to understand how popular culture narratives have framed -- and sometimes challenged -- those attitudes. The course will be run as a seminar with students responsible for preparing and leading class discussion each week. Coursework will include weekly reading and film viewing, oral presentations, papers and tests.

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FLM4610
  • Number of Credits: 4

WRT1001 Writing Across Contexts
4 Foundation Liberal Arts Credits

This course introduces students to key concepts in meaning-making and helps them develop rhetorically sophisticated approaches to reading, writing, and composing across contexts. Students refine and reflect on their own composing practices and processes past, present, and future as they read, analyze, and create texts for a wide variety of audiences, purposes, and media forms. At the end of the term and with the vocabulary developed in the course, each student articulates in an essay their own working theory of and approach to writing that they can mobilize and adapt for future academic and professional contexts.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Foundation Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: WRT1001
  • Number of Credits: 4

ENG4620 Writing Creative Non-Fiction
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
In this class, you will have the chance to write about moments in your life, and passionate interests, you wish to deeply explore. You will "read like a writer" to learn the elements and forms of creative nonfiction, including memoir, contemplative, nature, and travel essays. We will read creative nonfiction by such writers as Virginia Woolf, Zadie Smith, and David Foster Wallace, and consider both what the writers say and how they say it. You will write your own personal essays, developing your facility with such elements as conflict, persona, and character development, and, by sharing your work with peers, you will gain a critical understanding of your own writing. You will find, like creative nonfiction writer Dinty Moore, that "the happy by-product" of exploring, expressing the previously unspoken, "is that one has a richer life."


Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: ENG4620
  • Number of Credits: 4

ENG4605 Writing Fiction
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Short-story writer Flannery O'Connor believes that there is _a certain grain of stupidity that the writer of fiction can hardly do without, and this is the quality of having to stare, of not getting the point at once._ This class develops and nurtures close attention to the art and craft of making short stories. We will read excellent practitioners of the short story form in order to understand the elements of fiction: character, dialogue, place/setting, plot, and so on, and we will look for pleasure in our reading. Throughout the semester you will write short stories of varying length, aiming for authority over language, characterization, plot, and more. Your fiction will be received and read by your peers and professor. You will be a willing, open and active participant, prepared to discuss the work of others, and to reflect on responses to your own work. Short-story writer Tobias Wolff suggests that "in the short-story form you sense that perfection is attainable. That's an amazing invitation to have: here, at last, is something I can control."

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall or Spring


Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: ENG4605
  • Number of Credits: 4

ENG4604 Writing Poetry
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
A poet is a maker, an architect of words, spaces, and ideas and seeks expression through the use of various poetic techniques. This course challenges students to make original poetry through the study of contemporary American poetry and poetics. In addition to exploring the creative process through the crafting of poems, students read the poetry and essays of a wide variety of modern poets, work collaboratively to respond to peers' poems, attend poetry readings, and pursue independent study in an area of their own choice.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring or Fall

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: ENG4604
  • Number of Credits: 4

AMS4672 WORKING IN AMERICA: LABOR IN THE US SINCE 1892
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

How has blue, white, and pink collar work changed in the U.S. across the past centuries, and how sustainable are our models of work? This course focuses on the historical experiences of American workers, beginning with the mills of early industrialization and ending with the global corporations and big box chain stores of the contemporary U.S. We will study workers' unions, and also look at how workplaces have changed with the liberation movements of women, people of color, and LBGTQ+ workers. We will use written texts, films, and other rich sources to study how workers have shaped and adapted to the new, global economies of labor.

This course is periodically offered in the following semesters: Spring, Fall

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: AMS4672
  • Number of Credits: 4