HSS2013 China Today: The Dragon Rises
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This intermediate history course will introduce you to China's dynamic present within the context of the complex legacy of the Chinese past. We will examine the historical, cultural, political, and economic development of post 1949 China, with brief introductions to relevant aspects of the imperial past. You will gain a nuanced appreciation for the incredible economic growth of China from 1990 to the present, and the concomitant problems of state-society relations, human rights, minority relations, the environment, and the gaps between the rich and the poor and the urban and rural citizens. We will take advantage of Boston's resources through site visits to view Chinese art, undertake a scavenger hunt in Chinatown, and enjoy Chinese food. We will explore China through the use of scholarship, fiction, maps, memoir, art, film, and music.

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HSS2013
  • Number of Credits: 4

CHN2200 Chinese I
4 General Credits
An introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Free Elective (UGrad)
  • Course Number: CHN2200
  • Number of Credits: 4

CHN4610 Chinese II
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
A continuation of the fall semester, an introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring


Prerequisites: CHN1210 or CHN2200

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: CHN4610
  • Number of Credits: 4

FLM4691 Class, Gender, and Romance in American Comic Film
2 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
As a narrative form, comedy serves purposes beyond making us laugh. This course will explore how American film comedy reflects cultural values about romance, class, and gender. Through film viewing, reading, and discussion, we will consider how American cinema from the silent era to the present has reflected and presented American class consciousness and mobility, the romance myth, and gender representation. The readings will explore narrative theories and analytical models that address the purposes and strategies of comic form. Course requirements include response journals, class presentation and discussion, one short paper and a final exam.


Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FLM4691
  • Number of Credits: 2

NST1070 Climate and Human Health
4 Credits
This course investigates the interaction between the spheres of natural science and human health. Human activities impact the global climate and the resultant climate change impacts human health, both directly and indirectly. This course focuses on the background of various global health issues and their links to climate using the scientific method and multiple data-driven activities to evaluate research questions. We will also evaluate the integrity of scientific data, assessing reliable sources of information with respect to transparency and scientific bias.

Specific topics covered in this course include the connections between global changes such as sea level and temperature rise with human impacts including increasing climate migration, spread of infectious disease, and threats to food security. We will also investigate connections between industrialized agricultural, fossil fuel use, and the deterioration of water and air quality. Finally, we address the prominent role of environmental racism in the human health and climate connection. In taking this course, students will gain a broader understanding about the long-term effects of their actions, both on themselves as individuals and on other global citizens, and recognize opportunities for individual and systemic changes that result in a more sustainable world.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Mathematics Analytics Science and Technology
  • Level: Foundation Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: NST1070
  • Number of Credits: 4

ECN3664 College FED Challenge
2 Advanced Liberal Arts Elective Credits
This course exposes selected students to a rigorous exploration of advanced macroeconomic and monetary economic concepts, with a special emphasis on the conduct of monetary policy by the U.S. Federal Reserve. During the semester, students will research appropriate economic topics and make policy-oriented presentations. All aspects of the course will emphasize teamwork. The culminating experience of the course will be participation in the College Fed Challenge where students will present a fifteen minute monetary policy recommendation to a panel of local economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. The presentation is followed by a 15 minutes question and answer session.

Prerequisites: ECN3615

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Economics
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: ECN3664
  • Number of Credits: 2

SEN1338 Color Anarchy!

(Student Instructor: Angie Kalsi) Color is all around us and influences our everyday lives. From the clothes we wear to the way we decorate our living environments, the colors we choose to surround ourselves with greatly influence our mood, our decision-making, and even the opinions of those around us. In this course, students will re-learn what they thought they knew about color. They will be encouraged to challenge their own expectations of what color and design can be. In this course, we will be creating!

Tuesdays 6:30 - 9:00 pm

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1338
  • Number of Credits: 0

FLM4671 Comic Form in Film
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
This course explores the history and theory of comic form as it applies to movies from the silent film era to the present. Beginning with silent comedies and progressing to more recent films, we will consider such topics as comedy's roots in ancient ritual; recurring comic character types and genre conventions; irony, satire, anarchy, and surrealism as comic principles; and dark comedy. Course readings will introduce students to narrative theories, aesthetic and philosophical questions, and analytical models that address the purposes and strategies of comic form.


Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FLM4671
  • Number of Credits: 4

SEN1317 Communicate with Intention: Effective Use of Technology and Social Media for Aspiring Leaders(Senior Instructor: Josuel Plasencia) Leaders are characterized by their ability to think quickly, sometimes with few resources. Furthermore, in their communications, they must address multiple audiences, a tremendous challenge with the myriad other activities entrepreneurial leaders need to undertake. In _Communicate with Intention: Effective use of technology and social media for aspiring leaders,_ we will take a hands-on approach to practice the fast, flexible communication skills of successful entrepreneurial leaders. Through case studies, we will learn how to position ourselves through technology to create a personal brand and social networks online that lead to real results (a new job, an internship, a sale, a connection). We will use an individualized, interactive approach to analyze and enhance each student's communication strategy and online presence. The course will also argue that there is not one best approach to communications, and the instructor welcomes new ideas from students to shape the course.

Course Schedule:
Class 1 - Wednesday, Feb 1
Class 2 - Wednesday, Feb 8
Class 3 - TBD. Due to instructor conflict, an alternative date for this class will be selected.
Class 4 - Wednesday, Feb 22
Class 5 - Wednesday, March 1
Class 6/Showcase - Wednesday, March 8 (6 - 7:30)

Senior-Led Seminars are free, non-credit courses that are taught by seniors at Babson. They are graded non-credit pass or fail (NCP or NCF) and will appear on your transcript at the end of the semester. These courses are made possible by a generous gift of the Donald W. White, Sr. '50 Family.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1317
  • Number of Credits: 0

COM7503 Communicating and Collaborating in Virtual Teams

3 Elective CreditsIn this fully online course, students will learn how to successfully collaborate and communicate in virtual teams. Students will begin by reading and discussing course readings on organizational and global communication; virtual communication; and theoretical frameworks of the use of AI technologies in order to build a working knowledge of current collaboration technologies and effective communication in different contexts. Using this knowledge as a backdrop, students will explore and analyze the impact that these technologies have on business and communication. Students will apply their communication knowledge to a practical experience with existing virtual collaboration tools through shorter group assignments, guest speakers, interviews with remote workers, and a longer writing and oral presentation final project.

During the course, students will be expected to hold virtual class and group meetings, use and evaluate collaboration and project management tools, reflect on their virtual communication and leadership experiences, lead weekly remote group work, and write a final professional research report analyzing the communicative and collaborative effectiveness of state-of-the-art technology used in today's corporate environment.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: COM7503
  • Number of Credits: 3