News and Events

Spring 2022

Thompson poet

The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poets Series

Tuesday, April 5, 5:00 P.M.
Carling-Sorenson Theater 
FREE. Reservations required here.

The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poets Series brings acclaimed poets to the Babson College community. This long running series honors diversity, inclusion, and artistic excellence.

Cynthia Dewi Oka is originally from Bali, Indonesia. She is the author of Fire Is Not a Country (2021), Salvage (2017) and Nomad of Salt and Hard Water (2016). She is a recipient of the Tupelo Quarterly Poetry Prize and the Leeway Transformation Award. Her writing has appeared in The Atlantic, POETRY, Academy of American Poets, The Rumpus, PANK, Guernica, and elsewhere. She has taught creative writing at Bryn Mawr College and is a 2021-2022 Poet in Residence at the Amy Clampitt House in Lenox, MA.

“[Cynthnia Dewi Oka] traces the globe in gothic dimensions, revealing designs in the culture that would be transparent if not for the ‘brief . . . malevolent shadow[s]’ they cast. She invokes history’s ghosts to reckon with self-soverignty, and these poems help us map ourselves in a society where ‘having a body is not the same thing as being seen.’” – Gregory Pardlo

Series made possible in part by the Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poet Fund.

Waterline Reading Series Showcase


waterline pictureTuesday, March 29, 5:30 P.M.
Glavin Family Chapel
Free, reservations required .

Waterline features a fast-paced hour of literary works from Babson College faculty fiction writers, poets, and essayists.  The selection is always intriguing and often includes works in progress not yet in publication.  Featured authors for the spring include: Steve Bauer, Jordan Escobar, Melissa Leonard, Wes Miller, and Mary Pinard.

                                                                    Co-presented with the Arts and Humanities Division.

Sun Children imageSun Children
Presented by the Babson Global Film Series

Directed by Majid Majidi
Wednesday, March 2, 7:00 P.M. (EST)
Carling-Sorenson Theater
Reservations required here

On the streets of Tehran, twelve-year-old Ali and his three friends scramble to survive by doing small jobs and committing petty crimes. When a local crime boss presents them with an opportunity to improve their lives, they find themselves enrolled in a school for marginalized kids. Drawing on diverse influences including neorealism, social issue films, humanistic drama and magical realism, Sun Children is, at once, a riveting adventure story and an urgently heartfelt cry against the exploitation of children. 

Farhang Erfani, Associate Professor of Philosophy at American University, will lead a post-screening discussion immediately following the screening. 

Co-presented by the Global Film Series and the Arts and Humanities Division.

Professor Mary Pinard Wins First Place in Poetry Book Contest

Mary Pinard imageMary Pinard’s poetry manuscript, titled Ghost Heart, won first place in the Ex Ophidia Press Annual Poetry Book Contest.  Her work was selected from over 100 manuscript entries submitted by poets from around the world.  In addition to awarding Mary the prize, Ex Ophidia will publish Ghost Heart later this year. Congratulations, Mary!

Fall 2021

A Future of Plants: Recent Works of Olivia Baldwin

Baldwin art

Artist Talk & Reception 
Thursday, November 4, 5:00 P.M.

Exhibit on View November 4-January 14, 2022 
Hollister Gallery

Registration for Artist Talk and Reception is required here.
Free and open to the public.

A Future of Plants presents recent paintings by Olivia Baldwin, who teaches painting at Babson College.  Executed during the pandemic, Baldwin’s abstract paintings interweave remnants of past work with dense pigment and shadow drawings to investigate ways of marking time.  Baldwin is a Providence-based visual artist whose practice spans painting, drawing, and sculpture.  Her work has been exhibited in venues throughout the United States, including Zürcher Gallery, A.I.R. Gallery, Boston University, and Miami University. 

Waterline Reading Series Showcase


Waterline pictureWednesday, October 27, 5:00 P.M.
Glavin Family Chapel

Free with Registration

Waterline features a fast-paced hour of literary works from Babson College faculty fiction writers, poets, and essayists.  The selection is always intriguing and often includes works in progress not yet in publication.  Featured authors: Steve Bauer, Mary O’Donoghue, Melissa Leonard, Wes Miller, Mary Pinard, and Elizabeth Young.  

Co-presented with the Arts and Humanities Division.

Quo Vadis, Aida?
Presented by the Babson Global Film Series

Quo Vadis, AidaTuesday, October 26, 7:00 P.M. (EST)
Directed by Jasmila ZbanicCarling-Sorenson Theater 

Quo Vadis, Aida? is set in Bosnia in 1995. Aida is a translator for the UN in the small town of Srebrenica. When the Serbian army takes over the town, her family is among the thousands of citizens looking for shelter in the UN camp. As an insider to the negotiations, Aida has access to crucial information that could help save her husband and sons, as well as her neighbors and friends. What awaits her family and people - rescue or death? Which move should she make? Quo Vadis, Aida? uses one woman's heartbreaking situation to offer a searing account of war's devastating human toll. Although it addresses a specific time, place, and conflict, this unforgettable, profoundly moving story offers a timeless commentary on the ways in which geopolitical events affect individual lives.

Post-film discussion will be held immediately following the screening with Dijana Jelača, who teaches film courses at Brooklyn College and is programming director of the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Film Festival in New York..

Co-presented by the Global Film Series and the Arts and Humanities Division.

Spring 2021

The 2021 Wooten Prize for Excellence in Writing

1st Place: Meg Moulton for the essay “Coca Eradication in Colombia: Time for an Alternative.”
2nd Place: Maya Gupta for the essay “Duality in Desire: Female Sexuality in Song of Solomon.” 
3rd Place: Matthew Tufankjian for the essay "Trump v. TikTok."        

torrin a. greathouse picThe Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poets Series

torrin a. greathouse: Poetry, Disability, Trans Identity
Wednesday, April 7, 5:30 P.M. (EST)
Live Streaming Virtual Presentation
Registration is required HERE.
Only one registration per household is necessary.

Part 2 of the series this spring features torrin a. greathouse (she/her, they/them), a transgender cripple-punk poet from Southern California. Her work is published in the New York Times, POETRY, New England Review, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review, and Best New Poets 2020. They are the author of two chapbooks, There is a Case That I Ɐm (2017) and boy/girl/ghost (2018). Her first full-length collection Wound from the Mouth of a Wound, winner of the Ballard Spahr Prize for Poetry, was published in winter 2020. www.torringreathouse.com

“What does it mean to live in a body? To suffer in this late empire? To survive and offer a song? Wound from the Mouth of a Wound does all of this, yes – with intimacy, with honesty, with precision. torrin a. greathouse is an inimitable, endlessly compelling poet.” --Ilya Kaminsky

The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poets Series brings acclaimed poets to the Babson College community. The series honors diversity, inclusion, and artistic excellence. Because of pandemic pressures on travel and gathering in crowds, the 2021 series will be a live-streamed virtual event.

 

Chakraborty picQuesada picRooney pic

The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poets Series

Sumita Chakraborty, Ruben Quesada and Aidan Rooney: Poetry and 2020 Vision

Wednesday, March 31, 5:30 P.M. (EST)
Live Streaming Virtual Presentation
Registration is required HERE.
Only one registration per household is necessary.

Part 1 of the spring series features three poets reading their work followed by a panel discussion led by Mary O'Donoghue, novelist, short story writer, poet, and professor in the Arts and Humanities at Babson College.

Sumita Chakraborty is a poet, essayist, and scholar. Her debut collection of poetry, Arrow was published in fall 2020. She is the Helen Zell Visiting Professor in Poetry at the University of Michigan. Her poetry appears or is forthcoming in , , and elsewhere. She is a proud alumna of Wellesley College, where she received her BA. She is currently writing a book about death, ethics and the Anthropocene. www.sumitachakraborty.com

Ruben Quesada is the founder of Latinx Writers Caucus, an organization concerned with the education, equity, and inclusion of Latinx writers in the literary and publishing community. His most recent poetry collection is Revelations (2018). He is also the author of Next Extinct Mammal and Selected Translations of Luis Cernuda. He is currently co-editing an anthology of essays on Latinx poetry and poetics. www.rubenquesada.com

Aidan Rooney's most recent collection Go There was published in spring 2020. His previous collections are Tightrope and Day Release. In 2013 he was awarded the Daniel Varoujan Award from the New England Poetry Club. Born in Monaghan, Ireland, he lives in Hingham, Mass and teaches at Thayer Academy. He translates poetry and prose from French and Haitian Kreyol.

The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poets Series brings acclaimed poets to the Babson College community. The series honors diversity, inclusion, and artistic excellence. Because of pandemic pressures on travel and gathering in crowds, the 2021 series will be a live-streamed virtual event.

Waterline Reading Series Showcase

waterline picture

Wednesday, March 24, 5 p.m.
Carling Sorenson Theater with Live Streaming 
Registration is required for IN-PERSON HERE
Registration is required for VIRTUAL HERE
Only one registration per household is necessary for virtual attendance.
In-person attendees must be approved to be on campus, are required to wear masks, and remain appropriately distanced. Virtual attendees will receive the link for the presentation the day of the event.

Presented by the Division of Arts & Humanities

Waterline features a fast-paced hour of literary works with readings by Babson College faculty fiction writers, poets, and essayists including: Ellen Argyros, Steve Bauer, Wes Miller, Mary O'Donoghue and Mary Pinard.  Admission is free. 

Sorry We Missed You
Presented by the Babson Global Film Series

Sorry We Missed You movieSunday, March 28, 7:00 p.m. (EST)
Directed by Ken Loach
Carling-Sorenson Theater 
Registration is required HERE

Sorry We Missed You is a powerful drama about an English family trying to patch their life back together after experiencing hardship. Hope comes when the father seizes on an opportunity for self-employment. But as the story of their uphill battle to reclaim financial security and human dignity unfolds, the film reveals itself as a damning indictment of labor exploitation and of the gig economy. A humane portrait of the everyday lives of workers, Sorry We Missed You is consistently poignant and persuasive.

Joanne B. Ciulla, Professor and Director of the Institute for Ethical Leadership at Rutgers, will lead the post-film discussion. Professor Ciulla is a pioneer in the field of leadership ethics and her research draws heavily on literature in philosophy and history. 

The post-film discussion will be held virtually via WebEx, is open to the public, and registration is required to receive the link to the discussion. A link to view the film for those who cannot join in-person will be made available a week before the event. The film is also available on Amazon Prime and YouTube for a small rental fee set by those streaming services.

Co-presented by the Global Film Series and the Arts and Humanities Division.  Registration is required.

Fall 2020

Professor Elizabeth Swanson Selected one of 2020’s Best Undergraduate Business School Professors

Swanson pic

 

Babson is pleased to announce that Elizabeth Swanson, Professor and Mandell Family Foundation Senior Term Chair, has been selected by Poets and Quants as one of 2020’s  Best Undergraduate Business School Professors. Congratulations!

 

 

Parasite
Presented by the Babson Global Film Series

Parasite imageWednesday, November 11, 7:00 p.m.
Directed by Bong Joon-Ho
Carling-Sorenson Theater 


Winner of the 2019 Academy Award for best film, Parasite is a black-comedy thriller that follows the members of a destitute family who scheme their way into the household of a wealthy family. The symbiotic relationship and the battle for dominance that develops between the two clans is simultaneously hilarious and heart-wrenching. A darkly funny and suspenseful satire, Parasite is a devastating indictment of social inequality, class privilege, and greed -- and the contemporary cultural values that allow them to fester. Post-screening Q&A session can be joined virtually.

Film screening is open to only Babson students, faculty, and staff approved to be on campus. A post-screening discussion led by Michelle Cho, author and Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto, will be held virtually and is open to the public.  The link for the post-screening discussion will be available  the day of the event. 

Co-presented by the Global Film Series and the Arts and Humanities Division.  Registration is required.

Spring 2020

Rourke Named Undergraduate Faculty of the Year

Undergraduate Faculty of the Year Kerry Rourke

Senior Lecturer in English Kerry Rourke is the Undergraduate Faculty of the Year, receiving the accolade during the Virtual Senior Awards Ceremony on May 15. Students praised her as a challenging and supportive teacher and mentor.

“Professor Rourke fosters an inclusive environment in her classroom that allows her students to feel confident and comfortable bringing their personal life experiences to the collective discussion,” said one student nominator.

“Professor Rourke has transformed my way of thinking. She challenged me to think above and beyond my comfort zone,” said another.

Undergraduate Dean Ian Lapp echoed their sentiments. “Kerry Rourke has my greatest admiration as a transformative teacher, masterful mentor, innovative course designer, and wonderful colleague and friend to myself and so many across campus.”

Rourke has taught a variety of course offerings and served as director of the Writing Center and faculty trainer for all Senior Seminar instructors.

“I am grateful for this honor,” said Rourke. “The ultimate collaboration is with students. I never tire of that first day of classes, when the potential, the stories, the heartbreaks and successes walk in the door (real or virtual) with the students. I know we are about to share a dynamic exploration that will join us as co-learners for life. I appreciate the Class of 2020’s faith in me, and I hand it right back to them with a large dose of gratitude for our shared experiences.

The 2020 Wooten Prize for Excellence in Writing

1st Place: Evan Gaudreau for the essay “The Dangers of Misinformation: Greenwashing and Its Effects on the Environment.”
2nd Place: Britney Aguayo for the essay “The Weapon of Mass Inequity: Racial Capitalism.” 
3rd Place: Xueer (Cher) Ning for the essay "The Morality of Lying: A Contrast Between Western and Eastern Ethics."                                          

Dell Marie Hamilton: Until the Edge of Meaning

Artist Talk & Reception 
Thursday, March 5, 5:00 P.M.

Exhibit on View March 5-May 18
Hollister Gallery
M-F 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.

Working across a variety of mediums including performance, installation, video, painting and photography, Dell Marie Hamilton uses the body to investigate the social and geopolitical constructions of memory, gender, history and citizenship. With roots in Belize, Honduras and the Caribbean, she frequently draws upon the personal experiences of her family as well as the folkloric traditions and histories of the region. For this show at Babson College, she will be presenting photographic images as well as new works on paper.

Honeyland

Presented by The Babson Global Film Series

The Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen Honeyland, directed by Tamara Kotevska and Ljubo Stefanov, on Wednesday, March 4, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater. A guest speaker will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

The visually stunning and emotionally stirring Oscar-nominated documentary Honeyland captivated viewers at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, earning three highly coveted awards.  The filmmakers spent three years documenting the life and work of Hatizde Muratova, the last in a long line of wild beekeepers. She is thrown into upheaval when an itinerant patriarch with seven children and a herd of cattle arrives and tries to turn this empty patch of territory into a literal land of milk and honey sufficient to feed his family. As the New York Time’ A.O. Scott observes, the conflict that results over scarce and fragile resources feels, “like a microcosm of the human predicament at a time of environmental catastrophe.” From this complicated and fractious terrain, the directors have shaped a “luminous neorealist fable, a sad and stirring tale of struggle, persistence and change” that speaks profoundly to our own time.

Waterline Reading Series Showcase

Tuesday, March 3, 5 p.m.
Glavin Chapel

Presented by the Division of Arts & Humanities

Waterline features a fast-paced hour of literary works with readings by Babson College faculty fiction writers, poets, and essayists including: Ellen Argyros, Steve Bauer, Wes Miller and Mary Pinard.  Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.

Ronald Gonzalez: Seeing Through My Eyes

Artist Talk & Reception 
Tuesday, January 28, 5:00 P.M.

Exhibit on View January 28-February 27
Hollister Gallery
M-F 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.

 Aged, found objects, their inherent physicality shaped and hardened by history are the core materials of Ron Gonzalez's anthropomorphic sculptures.  The artist combines these found objects with leather scraps, soot, wax, and wire to build sculptural heads that contain a sense of past, present, and future within their aggregate anatomies. For Gonzalez, the objects that have been the most hard-worn or degraded, those that reached the "point of no return" are the most compelling, because they reflect finite human existence while simultaneously taking on new beginning as a raw material. There is a stored vulnerability to each of these heads, their hybrid persona having been uniquely defined by the selection of objects pieced together to make them whole. 

Fall 2019

Professor Mary Pinard's Poetic Elegy class presents Poetry Anthology: Fly Me to the Void

Mary Pinard, Professor of English, is pleased to share Fly Me To the Void, an anthology of original elegies written and edited by her Poetic Elegy students. Each student contributed two original poems and a brief overview of who they are, what they enjoy, and where they are in their Babson careers. Please enjoy reading the attached pdf.

Fly Me To The Void (pdf)

Professor Sandra Graham receives the Music in American Culture Award

Sandra Graham, Associate Professor of Music, was presented with the Music in American Culture Award at this year’s Annual Meeting of the American Musicological Society in Boston. Sandy was recognized for her recent book “Spirituals and the Birth of a Black Entertainment Industry (Illinois, 2018).”

“Music historians will find Spirituals and the Birth of a Black Entertainment Industry fascinating because instead of rehashing the already well-researched lyric import of the spirituals, Graham looks at the art form as the spark that ignited an entertainment industry.” -- ARSC Journal

At the Awards Ceremony, committee chair Andy Flory, Assistant Professor of Music at the Carleton College, read the following citation:

“Understanding race through music is a fundamental issue in musicological work that foregrounds American identity. This year’s award winner addresses this topic in a study of nineteenth-century commercial performance traditions. ‘This cogent and detailed study distills countless hours of research into a narrative that changes our understanding of the spiritual, one of the most fundamental genres in American music,’ wrote one committee member. Another found the book to be ‘expertly researched and written,’ noting that ‘it will quickly become a fundamental resource for scholars of American music, and African-American music, specifically.’ The field of writing about American music is strong and this book is among its finest.”

Laila at the Bridge

Laila at the Bridge

Presented by The Babson Global Film Series

The Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen Laila at the Bridge, directed by Elizabeth Mirzaei and Gulistan Mirzaei, on Tuesday, November 12, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater. A guest speaker will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

A story of heroism against impossible odds, this documentary follows Laila Haidari, an irrepressible survivor of child marriage and her own traumatic past.  In the face of physical threats, governmental opposition and the departure of the international community from an Afghanistan on the verge of collapse, Laila fights to keep alive her labor of love – a drug treatment center and a restaurant staffed by recovering addicts.  Laila at the Bridge is a portrait of a determined woman who risks everything and perseveres in the face of overwhelming challenges.  

Deindustrialization: Photographs by James Hunt

James Hunt

November 7–January 10 2019
Hollister Gallery

Artist Talk and Reception
Thursday November 7, 5 p.m.

Exhibit Hours
M-F, 9 a.m.–7 p.m. 

Babson Professor and photographer James Hunt has documented the once thriving textile mills of the nearby Blackstone River Valley. From Worcester to Providence, dams and mills were built along nearly every mile of River. Thousands of workers processed millions of tons of textiles over 200 years, generating vast wealth, for some. Most mill workers and the enslaved people and sharecroppers who grew the cotton did not share in that wealth. By the 1970’s, the River itself was described as one of most polluted in the US. Work and money went elsewhere. The mills remain, monuments to economic cycles of boom and bust, now abandoned, burned, repurposed, or left waiting.

Award-winning Arts & Humanities Professors

Professors Beth Wynstra and Wes Miller receive the Deans’ Award for Excellence in Teaching

This year two Arts & Humanities professors were award recipients: Beth Wynstra , Assistant Professor of English, received the Undergraduate Teaching Award and Wes Miller, Adjunct Lecturer, the Adjunct Lecturer Teaching Award. The Deans of the Undergraduate, Graduate and Executive programs, along with the Dean of Faculty, choose five faculty members to receive awards for excellence in teaching. For each award, they consider innovative teaching, skill at teaching in integrated and cross-disciplinary settings, and engagement with course and curriculum design.

Professor Jason Moghaghegh is awarded the Faculty Scholarship Award

Arts & Humanities’ Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, Jason Mohaghegh, received the Conceptual Scholar Award. The Faculty Scholarship Awards are chosen by the members of the Babson Faculty Research Fund and the Dean of Faculty to recognize important scholarly work by faculty across the campus.

Good scholarly work helps to change the world, and this year’s award winners have been part of making change happen. Congratulations to all!

Waterline Reading Series Showcase

Waterline Reading Series October 2019

Wednesday, October 30, 5 p.m.
Glavin Chapel

Presented by the Division of Arts & Humanities

Waterline features a fast-paced hour of literary works with readings by Babson College faculty fiction writers, poets, and essayists including: Ellen Argyros, Steve Bauer, Mary O’Donoghue, Mary Pinard and Elizabeth Young. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.

The Intelligent Design of Jenny Chow – A play by Rolin Jones

The Intelligent Design of Jenny Chow

Directed by Olin College Professor Jonathan Adler
Produced by Babson College Professor Beth Wynstra, with support from Wellesley College Professor Marta Rainer

October 24, 7 p.m.
October 25, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
October 26, 7 p.m.
Carling-Sorenson Theater

Tickets $15; Babson faculty/staff $10; Students $5
Purchase Tickets »

Presented by The Empty Space Theater

Jennifer is a typical 22-year-old California girl who reengineers obsolete missile components for the U.S. Army from her bedroom. When she decides to meet her birth mother in China, she uses her technological genius and entrepreneurial drive to devise a new form of human contact. Rolin Jones’ irreverent “techno-comedy” chronicles one brilliant young woman’s quest to determine her heritage and face her fears with the help of a Mormon missionary, a pizza delivery guy, and her astounding A.I. creation named Jenny Chow. An Obie Award winner and Pulitzer Prize finalist, this play is all about the power—and limits—of technology to solve our problems.

The Intelligent Design of Jenny Chow is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Services, Inc., New York, and is supported in part by a Babson-Olin-Wellesley Presidential Innovation Grant.

Crafting Political Discourse: A Conversation with Adam Farina ’15, Speechwriter

Adam Farina ’15, Speechwriter

Tuesday, October 1, 7 p.m.
Carling-Sorenson Theater

Foundations of Critical Inquiry (FCI) Speaker, presented by the Arts & Humanities and History & Society Divisions

At a time when the U.S. political landscape is dynamic and often divisive, speechwriters craft the persuasive, memorable, and influential messages that help win elections and keep citizens engaged. Adam Farina shares anecdotes about the power of political rhetoric and discusses how an entrepreneurship education prepared him for an unorthodox post-Babson career.

Excerpts – Installation by Naoe Suzuki

Naoe Suzuki painting

September 12–November 1,. 2019
Hollister Gallery

Artist Talk and Reception
Thursday September 12, 5 p.m.

Exhibit Hours
M-F, 9 a.m.–7 p.m. and by appointment

Excerpts is a new iteration of Naoe Suzuki’s work from her Artist-in-Residence projects from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, a biomedical research institute. In this new iteration at Babson College, she will compose two pieces that use magic spells from the Edwin Smith Papyrus, the medical papyrus in ancient Egypt that included prognosis for the first time in recorded history. These pieces provoke and respond to each other, creating a rich dialogue on the ways that our understanding of knowledge, belief, and loss and discovery, inform medical science and the cycle of exploration.

Spring 2019

The 2019 Wooten Prize for Excellence in Writing

1st Place: Michael Ioffe for the essay God and Women in Machinal.”
2nd Place: Gioia de la Feld for the essay “Lights On, Lights Off.”
3rd Place: Benjamin Graham-Osborne for the essay "Family as a Source of Support and Dysfunction: The Haunting of Hill House Through a Noir Lens." 

Jericho Brown

Jericho Brown

Presented by The Charles D. and Marjorie J. Thompson Visiting Poet Series

“To read Jericho Brown’s poems is to encounter devastating genius.” – Claudia Rankine

This long-running poetry series has br​ought poets of highest distinction and international acclaim to the Babson campus. On Tuesday, April 2, at 7 p.m., we welcome Thompson Poet Jericho Brown to the Sorenson Center.​

Brown is the author of three collections of poetry: The Tradition (2019); The New Testament (Copper Canyon 2014), won the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award and was named one of the best of the year by Library Journal, Coldfront, and the Academy of American Poets; and Please (New Issues, 2008), which won the 2009 American Book Award. He is the recipient of the Whiting Writers Award and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Krakow Poetry Seminar in Poland. Brown was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award, the Thom Gunn Award, and the Hurston Wright Poetry Prize. His poems have appeared in The Nation, The New Yorker, The New Republic, and The Best American Poetry.

Seed: The Untold Story

Seed: The Untold Story

Presented by The Babson Global Film Series

The Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen Seed: The Untold Story, directed by Jon Betz and Taggart Siegel, on Tuesday, March 26, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater. Speaker Hannah Traggis, Senior Horticulturist at The Gardens at Elm Bank, will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

In a world threatened by overpopulation and over-exploited land, is there a way out of the coming food crisis? For the makers of SEED: The Untold Story, the answer lies in the creation and maintenance of localized seed banks where the collection of traditional, often ancient seed species will ensure both planetary biodiversity and self-sustaining food supplies. This inspiring film tells the stories of courageous individuals and communities across the planet: tribal peoples, citizen-activists, farmers, and others all working to ensure the earth’s sustenance and survival. SEED: The Untold Story reminds us of the inherent and unstoppable power of community activism in pursuit of the preservation of our land, our communities, and our lives.

Waterline Reading Series Showcase

Ellen Argyros

Wednesday, March 13
Glavin Chapel 5 p.m.

Waterline features a fast-paced hour of literary works with readings by Babson faculty fiction writers, poets, and essayists including: Ellen Argyros, Steve Bauer, Mike Martin, Wes Miller, and Mary Pinard. Admission is free. Refreshments will be served.

Ixcanul

Global Film Series Ixcanul

Presented by The Babson Global Film Series

The Babson Global Film Series and Arts and Humanities Division will screen Ixcanul, directed by Jayro Bustamente, on Tuesday, February 12, at 7 p.m. in the Carling-Sorenson Theater. Speaker Katie B. Kohn, from Harvard University, will introduce the film and lead a post-screening discussion.

Ixcanul,” which means “volcano” in the Mayan language, refers both to the peak that overlooks the Guatemalan coffee plantation where the film is set and to the restless and ultimately eruptive emotions at the movie’s core. Focusing on the bonds between two strong indigenous women, a mother and a daughter, Ixcanul questions how, in all cultures, the powerful may prey upon the vulnerable. Its message is urgent: for a society to be just, women must be empowered with the freedom to make decisions about their lives and futures.

World News: Alternate Views by Nancy Jenner

Artist Talk and Reception: Thursday January 31, 5 p.m.
Exhibit on View: January 31–March 1
Hollister Gallery Hours: Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–7 p.m.

In today’s media-rich culture, we are beginning to learn that everything we see or read is constructed, shaped by the news media we favor and our political inclinations. In these two installations, Jenner provides alternative ways to view the news of the world. Beginning with a pressing issue, environmental pollution in one and the toll of political conflict on families in the other, the pieces share references to art history but are as distinct as the issues, using different media and materials to build a visual narrative on the topic. The work doesn’t claim to have answers, only to provide perspective and, perhaps, cause us to be more circumspect in our conclusions and more motivated in our advocacy.

Registration for Artist Talk and Reception is required HERE  (https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/1071236 )
FREE and open to the public.  

A Future of Plants presents recent paintings by Olivia Baldwin.  Executed during the pandemic, Baldwin’s abstract paintings interweave remnants of past work with dense pigment and shadow drawings to investigate ways of marking time.  Baldwin is a Providence-based visual artist whose practice spans painting, drawing, and sculpture.  Her work has been exhibited in venues throughout the United States, including Zürcher Gallery, A.I.R. Gallery, Boston University, and Miami University. 

Baldwin is a Providence-based visual artist whose practice spans painting, drawing, and sculpture and teaches painting at Babson.