Arts and Humanities Course Listing

Undergraduate

ARB2200 - INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC

ARB2200 Introduction to Arabic
4 Free Elective Credits
This course is an introduction to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and the Levantine dialect. It introduces students to Arabic sounds and alphabet, basic reading and writing, and essentials for everyday conversations. It is built on an interactive methodology using a variety of authentic materials such as news, film, songs, art, food and cooking. It emphasizes the active participation of students in the learning process. Project-based learning is the main instructional approach, and classes are designed to teach language through engaging projects set around specific cultural topics. Students will cook and taste food, virtually visit Arab cities and museums, research Arab artists, watch movie clips and music videos, and even learn and sing Arabic songs! Arabic 2200 is the initial course in the Arabic language sequence at Babson.

Students are precluded from taking more advanced courses in the sequence (Arabic 4610, 4640, 4650) prior to this course unless permitted by the instructor.

4 credits

ARB4610 - ARABIC II: LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND BUSINES

ARB4610 Elementary Arabic II: Language, Culture and Business
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

Arabic 4610 is a project-based course designed to give students the opportunity to develop Arabic language and culture knowledge through engaging projects set around daily activities and situations students may experience in the real world. These projects will help students to build vocabulary, grammar and general communicative competence. They will help them enhance the spoken skills necessary for a variety of daily activities, and will expose them to the diverse dialects and rich cultures of the Arab World. Projects include: cooking lessons at the Foundry, learning Dabke dance, learning Arabic calligraphy, dining at an Arab restaurant and much more.

You may sign-up for this class if you have successfully completed ARB2200 or its equivalent, or you are a heritage speaker who can understand Arabic minimally.


Prerequisites: ARB2200

4 credits

ARB4640 - ARABIC CINEMA & CULTURE

ARB4640 Arab Cinema and Culture

(Formerly ARB4600)
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
This course is designed as an advanced-level conversation class, with a strong cultural component. It explores Arab cinema from the colonial period to the present and provides an in-depth exploration of "cultural identity" and "politics" in the Arab World. Although Egypt is considered the biggest film producer in the Arab world, the course aspires to represent various cinemas across the region, from Morocco and Algeria to Syria, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and Palestine, introducing students to notable moments and phenomena in the history of these cinemas. The course will be taught in Arabic and all films will be in Arabic with English subtitle. In addition to film viewings, students will be required to read critical and theoretical articles that pertain to class discussion. These films and readings serve as the basis for debate, discussion and written analysis of issues relevant to the history, culture and politics of the Arab world and the Middle East. Films will be on reserve at Horn Library, and screenings will be scheduled.

Prerequisites: Students need to be at least at a high intermediate level
This course is open to advanced and heritage speakers of Arabic

4 credits

ARB4650 - BUSINESS ARABIC

ARB4650 Business Arabic
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

This course aims to help students acquire and develop the tools necessary to learn about business in the Arab world from the Arabic media perspective. Arabic 4650 is open to all students and does not require any previous knowledge of Arabic. The course is divided in two sections: the first explores the business culture and etiquette of the Arab World and discusses related topics such as travel, communication and negotiation styles, attitudes and hierarchy in the workplace using current Arab media materials. The second section includes a number of modules organized around current issues such as "diplomacy and the economy," "elections and the economy," "terrorism and the economy," "sanctions and the economy," and "violence and anarchy and the economy."

Arabic 4650 is an Advanced Liberal Arts course.

4 credits

ART1171 - MIXED MEDIA DRAWING

ART1171 Mixed Media Drawing
4 General Credits

This is an introductory course designed to engage observational and experimental approaches to drawing. Employing a broad range of materials, from charcoal and pastels to ink and found materials, students will study and synthesize fundamentals such as perspective, mark making, line quality, value, and figure-ground relationships. Guided observational exercises will aid in deconstructing objects and translating spatial relationships. In addition to these techniques, the course will engage found imagery and printmaking strategies to explore drawing's vast possibilities as a methodology, a record, and a problem-solving tool. Critiques will provide an opportunity to collectively assess, interpret, and reflect upon students' work. A selection of artists' writings, interviews, and videos will complement the drawing prompts, investigating drawing as an evolving, contemporary practice.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall


Prerequisites: None

4 credits

ART1172 - INTRO TO SCULPTURE

ART1172 Introduction to Sculpture
4 General Credits
This is an introductory level studio art course designed to engage you with basic sculptural concepts and processes through the creation of your own sculpture. Working with basic material such as plasticene, plaster, wood, and wire, we will learn carving, modeling, and other methods of construction as we explore assignments that parallel historical approaches and processes. As a means of developing a full range of approaches towards making sculpture, we will examine paleo-lithic sculpture; Egyptian, Greek, and Renaissance bas-relief sculpture; abstract, kinetic and minimal sculpture; and installation and conceptual art. Students will be asked to keep a sketchbook for the development and critique of visual ideas. Through visualization, drawing, design, construction, and critique of sculpture, students will expand their skills of observation, critical analysis, and creative problem solving.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring


Prerequisites: None

4 credits

ART1175 - BEGIN PAINTING WATERCOLOR ACRYLIC

ART1175 Beginning Painting Watercolor and Acrylic
4 General Credits
This is an introductory level course designed to bring students through basic aspects of drawing in a wide range of media. No previous experience is required. Issues such as line, tone, mark making, gesture form, light sources, figure/ground relationships, and perspective to overall compositions will be addressed separately and in the many ways that they relate to one another in a drawing. Students will draw observationally from life and from their own drawings, learning how to use each of these concepts as tools in order to draw and see more analytically. We will work with a wide range of materials from basic graphite pencils and charcoal to ink washes, conte crayon on gesso treated paper, silverpoint, collage, and printmaking. Slides of various artists' work will be discussed in relation to concepts and processes explored in class. Student work will be discussed in group critiques with full class participation. Students should be committed to expanding their skills and can expect project deadlines. There will be some expense for materials.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: None

4 credits

ART1200 - PAINTING THROUGH POETRY

ART1200 Painting Through Poetry

4 Free Credits

Artists have long produced work in conversation with others in their communities. This exchange is particularly vital and enduring among painters and poets. In this course, we will trace the relationships of contemporary and historical practitioners. With poems as our prompts, we will explore painting as a visual language that is fundamentally relational. Through a series of visual experiments, from painting to collage, we will interrogate the relationship between parts and wholes, representation and abstraction, text and image. We will consider moments in which language constrains meaning while painting expands it and vice versa. Together, through making, we will uncover questions, generate ideas, and apply the specificity of poetry to the space of painting.

Prerequisites: None

4 credits

ART4602 - THE ORIGINS OF MODERN ART

ART4602 The Origins of Modern Art
(Formerly VSA4602 19th Century European Art)
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Examines the social, economic and political changes in 19th century Europe that led to the creation of Impressionism and early modern art. Explores the meaning of modern art by examining the contexts (social, economic, and artistic) in which pioneering artists lived. The class will look briefly at Neoclassicism, Romanticism, and Realism to understand their contributions to Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Art Nouveau and Expressivism with special focus on major artists, sculptors, and architects such as Monet, Renoir, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Munch, Rodin, Claudel, Garnier, and Eiffel who shaped what we now call Modern Art. We will visit local museums with early modern art collections as part of the course in order to see and discuss art "in person".

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall, Spring or Summer

Prerequisites: Any Combination 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS)

4 credits

ART4610 - ARTS OF THE RENAISSANCE

ART4610 Arts of the Renaissance: Patrons, Politics and Piety
(Formerly VSA4610)
4 Advanced Liberal Arts CreditsThis is an advanced level course in the area of Literature and the Visual Arts. This course examines some of the major paintings and sculptures and architecture from Italy and Northern Europe that shaped modern culture. The Renaissance was a period of discoveries. New concepts of the self, new markets, new technologies, new devotions changed the shape of Europe. Works of art document many of the transformations that occurred between the Black Death and the Protestant Reformation. It will develop skills in interpreting visual images and build competence in creative thinking. Class lectures and discussions will be based primarily on slide presentations.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring or Fall


Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS)

4 credits

ART4615 - RACING TOWARDS THE FUTURE: EARLY 20TH CENTURY ART

ART4615 Racing Towards the Future: Early 20th Century Art
(Formerly VSA4615)
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Between 1900 -1938, young artists grappled with enormous political, scientific, technological, and social disruptions that threw them headlong into the modern world. Styles such as Symbolism, Cubism, Futurism, Expressivism, Dada and Surrealism were their responses to changes in established ways of thinking and being that marked the beginning of the 20th century. Visits to The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The Davies Museum of Wellesley College and the Fogg Museum of Harvard University, which have very strong collections from this period, will offer students the opportunity to directly experience this art.

Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS LVA CVA)

4 credits

CHN2200 - CHINESE I

CHN2200 Chinese I
4 General Credits
An introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: None

4 credits

CHN4610 - CHINESE II

CHN4610 Chinese II
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
A continuation of the fall semester, an introduction to practical and functional knowledge of modern Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis on developing proficiency in fundamental language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using basic expressions and sentence patterns. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring


Prerequisites: CHN1210 or CHN2200

4 credits

CSP2001 - ETHICS

CSP2001 Introduction to Ethics

(Formerly CVA2001)
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits

Discussions relate morality to the life and circumstances of contemporary society by offering a solid grounding in the major concepts of ethical theory and in the basic skills for analyzing ethical issues and making sound moral judgments.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Spring

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

4 credits

CSP2007 - INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY

CSP2007 Introduction to Philosophy

(Formerly CVA2007)
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
Introduction to Philosophy treats the most basic and pervasive human questions: Does God exist? What is the nature of the self? What is the relationship between our mind and our body? Do human beings have an immortal soul? Do we have free will? What is the difference between a human being and a computer? How can value judgments be justified? What is the proper relationship between the individual and the community? What is the best kind of human life?

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

4 credits