Arts and Humanities Course Listing

CVA2019 - GLOBAL LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

GLOBAL LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

SUMMER INSTITUTE - This course must be taken together with MOB3505 CVA2019 Global Leadership Development 4 credits Intermediate Liberal Arts This Summer Institute is comprised of two courses about the worlds most intractable problems, and about conceptualizing ways to address them. You have chosen an auspicious moment to engage this topic, as the United Nations is currently shifting from its Millennium Development Goals to the new Sustainable Development Goals which will be launched in September 2015. Because Babson is part of the Champions Group of the UN Principles of Responsible Development Education (UN PRME), we have the opportunity to visit and to consult with this branch of the UN on how to translate the new SDGs so that they become relevant to business schools and business students. As such, our course has a certainty urgency and practicality to it that will be reflected in the coursework. And as a Summer Institute, we will travel to NYC to visit the UN, host exciting visitors who are leading in this space, and more! In order to become a global leader, you must understand the context not only of the problems we face on a global level, but also of the partnerships among governments, businesses, NGOs, and concerned global citizens that are created in order to address them: this will be the topic in HUM3605. In order to consider ways to use entrepreneurial thought and action to address those problems, you must learn to clearly identify and scope opportunities, develop feasible and actionable plans to address the opportunities and be able to articulate those plans to various audiences, which will make up the work in MOB3505. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and Foundation AH & HS

4.00 credits

CVA2025 - INTRO TO LGBTQ CULTURE STUDIES

INTRO TO LGBTQ CULTURE STUDIES

CVA2025 Introduction to LGBTQ Cultural Studies (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Cultural Studies borrows from history, political science, psychology, literature, sociology, anthropology, film studies, media studies, and other disciplines to dismantle and thereby understand the cultural forces and variables which work together to construct meaning. In this course, we will look specifically at how LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning) identities and meanings have been and continue to be constructed, primarily but not exclusively in U.S. culture. We will actively consider how we, as human beings and agents of construction ourselves, contribute to or resist cultural meanings of LGBTQ. In our course of study, we will read theory, study film and other visual media, and interrogate texts, such as television shows, from popular culture. Each student will have an opportunity to develop a short individual project tailored to his or her interests. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation HSF and AHF This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

CVA2030 - AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSIC IN THE US

AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSIC IN THE US

CVA2030 African American Music in the U.S. 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course surveys music created by and about African Americans from the 19th century to the present, including spirituals, gospel, ragtime, blues, jazz, classical, R&B, rock and roll, soul, funk, disco, and rap. The course will emphasize: (1) African origins, and the historical and sociocultural contexts in which African American musical styles developed; (2) nontechnical musical analysis of the works studied; (3) the reciprocal relationships between African American music and other American music; and (4) the ways in which music participates in and shapes our national perceptions of and debates over race. No musical background required. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS

4.00 credits

CVA2032 - APPRECIATING CLASSICAL MUSIC

APPRECIATING CLASSICAL MUSIC

CVA2032 Appreciating Classical Music: The Art of Listening 4 credit intermediate liberal arts Classical music can seem daunting to inexperienced listeners. How do you make sense of instrumental music that has no lyrics to guide you? What instruments are you hearing? How do you make sense of an opera in a language you dont understand? How can you tell the difference between one orchestra and another? Why are some works typically performed in a church, others in a theater, others in a concert hall, and still others in intimate spaces? Why do we still revere composers like J.S. Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner? Why cant most people name a female composer? This courses answers these questions, and more, through a thematic introduction to the classical music tradition of Western Europe and the United States. Foundation AHS and RHT

4.00 credits

CVA2057 - NARRATIVES OF SUSTAINABILITY

NARRATIVES OF SUSTAINABILITY

CVA2057: Narratives of Sustainability (Previously titled Imagining Sustainability) (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The primary focus of this course is on the exploration of the concept of sustainability as a juncture of economic, environmental and social concerns. With the rapid expansion of globalization, and the attenuating crises that accompany it, with regard to these concerns, future business and public policy leaders will need to be in the vanguard at determining how best to effect solutions. To that end, this course will examine a variety of sources in the consideration both of what allows for the implementation of sustainability and what prohibits it--from business case study to philosophical/economic analysis to literary memoir. Within this context, students will be invited to examine what we mean when we talk about "justice," "ethics," "profit," "growth," and "community." In sum, we will explore how concepts that contribute to our understanding of individual and communal responsibility might be revisited and redefined in the effort to create a world that offers sustainable economic opportunity for all, ensured within a vital commitment to environmental stewardship. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring or a Summer semester

4.00 credits

CVA2058 - AFTER THE DICTATOR

AFTER THE DICTATOR

CVA2058 After the Dictator (Intermediate Liberal Arts) In this course, we will look at artistic and other cultural responses (film, narrative, art, music, popular culture) that reflect and inform the experience of dictatorship and the transition from authoritarianism to the promise of a more open form of governance. Through films and texts that explore questions of history and the representation of national and individual identities, we will consider cultural responses to the consequences of dictatorship and the new political, economic, and social realities that have emerged. Scholars, policymakers, and business leaders are among those interested in addressing the causes, character, and possibilities of these transformations. The democratic transition in Spain, which began with the death of Francisco Franco in 1975, provides a valuable point of comparison to our examination of various other country examples. What are the differing strategies used to come to terms with the past and the legacy of dictatorship? How successful have these political transitions been? What elements remain unresolved, and how do they continue to play out or find expression in the culture and society? Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation H&S and A&H This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.

4.00 credits

ENG4602 - PRACTICUM IN PEER CONSULTING AND WRITING

PRACTICUM IN PEER CONSULTING AND WRITING

ENG4602 Practicum in Peer Consulting and Writing (Advanced Liberal Arts) Students learn to act as peer consultants in writing and work on improving their own writing, critical thinking, and interpersonal skills. They accomplish these objectives by addressing their writing problems; writing extensively; developing criteria to evaluate the writings of others; studying various writing processes and theories of composition; examining pedagogical approaches to teaching writing; reading extensively about, and becoming acquainted with, the dynamics of peer tutoring; and working in the Writing Center as peer consultant trainees. Prerequisite: Instructor permission This course may be offered Spring semester

4.00 credits

ENG4604 - WRITING POETRY

WRITING POETRY

ENG4604 Writing Poetry (Advanced Liberal Arts) A poet is a maker, an architect of words, spaces, and ideas and seeks expression through the use of various poetic techniques. This course challenges students to make original poetry through the study of contemporary American poetry and poetics. In addition to exploring the creative process through the crafting of poems, students read the poetry and essays of a wide variety of modern poets, work collaboratively to respond to peers' poems, attend poetry readings, and pursue independent study in an area of their own choice. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS) This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits

ENG4605 - WRITING FICTION

WRITING FICTION

ENG4605 Writing Fiction 4 credit (Advanced Liberal Arts) Flannery O'Connor said there is "a certain grain of stupidity that the writer of fiction can hardly do without, and this is the quality of having to stare, of not getting the point at once." This class (while not demanding that you cultivate stupidity!) develops and nurtures close attention to how short fiction is made. You will study the art and craft of making short stories. This course emphasizes reading, whereby we will study practitioners of the short story form in order to understand the elements of fiction: character, dialogue, place/setting, plot, and so on. In class, we will take stories apart to see just 'how they tick'. In addition, we will (as pleasure-seekers) look for enjoyment in what we read. By and large, this course runs on writing. You will write short stories of varying lengths, aiming for authority over language, characterization and plot, and authenticity. Your fiction will be closely analyzed by your peers and professor. So you must be a willing, open and active participant, prepared to discuss the work of others, and to reflect on responses to your own work. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts Courses (CVA, LVA, HSS) This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.

4.00 credits

ENG4610 - MAKING A SCENE: FUND OF DRAMATIC SCENE C

MAKING A SCENE: FUND OF DRAMATIC SCENE C

ENG4610 Making a Scene: Fundamentals of Dramatic Scene Construction (LIT) 4 credit advanced liberal arts This course will give you instruction and practice in creating what is essentially the basic unit of a dramatic work: the scene. You will work on creating dramatic scenes that move us, that make us laugh, that make us think, that make us care about the characters and character relationships, and that make us want to watch, to keep watching, and to see what happens next. You will write and workshop original scenes; carefully and critically analyze other writers scenes from the worlds of theatre, film, and television; and read and discuss advice from experts in these fields. The goal in all that you do will be to become better writers, readers, and viewers of the dramatic arts broadly conceived. Prerequisites: Three intermediate liberal arts (HSS, LVA, CVA)

4.00 credits

ENG4620 - WRITING CREATIVE NON-FICTION

WRITING CREATIVE NON-FICTION

ENG4620:01 Writing Creative Non-fiction 4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits In this course, we will read and study how creative non-fiction writers capture diverse subject matter including memoir, nature, travel, cultural, social and political essays. The creative non-fiction essay draws upon the skills of fiction, poetry and expository writing to arrive to the writers unique perspective of the world. The writer uses dialogue, description, setting, characterization, rhythm, sound and form to express active thinking on page. Incorporating these diverse elements into an essay allows the writer to imagine, question, contradict and complicate subject matter. In class, we will move through several exercises to hone our skills towards writing essays and will work collaboratively in offering feedback. Writing Creative Non-fiction allows the writer great freedom to develop both their ideas and their writing skills. Prerequisite: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS, CVA, LVA)

4.00 credits

FLM4605 - CULTURE THROUGH FILM IN THE MIDDLE EAST

CULTURE THROUGH FILM IN THE MIDDLE EAST

FLM4605 CULTURE THROUGH FILM IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AMERICA 4 credit - advanced liberal arts This course will provide a broad introduction to the historical, literary, artistic, and popular cultures of the Middle East and North Africa. It will examine how film in this part of the world is used as a space through which filmmakers reflect on significant cultural, social, political issues and concerns. Students will learn about the different cinematic genres in the Middle East and North Africa and will explore how issues like poverty, independence, religion, political freedom, womens rights are visually expressed. The course will offer a survey of films from the Middle East and North Africa. It seeks to represent various movies across the region, from Morocco and Algeria, to Egypt and Saudi Arabia, to Lebanon, Syria and Palestine, with the aim to expose students to different cultures and introduce them to important moments and phenomena in the history of these countries. The course will be taught in English and all films will have English subtitles.

4.00 credits

FLM4610 - WORK, PLAY & ADULTHOOD IN AMER MOVIES

WORK, PLAY & ADULTHOOD IN AMER MOVIES

FLM4610 Work, Play and Adulthood in American Movies 4 credit advanced liberal arts What constitutes the good life? How do we define success? What happens when individuals definitions of success collide with broad-based cultural assumptions about achievement and happiness? What are the markers of adulthood? Whats gained and whats lost once childhood and adolescence end? From the silent film era to the present, American movies have examined such questions along with our collective attitudes toward work, leisure, and pleasure. In this film history course, we will view movies from across the decades and read works of social theory, history and philosophy in an effort to understand how popular culture narratives have framed -- and sometimes challenged -- those attitudes. The course will be run as a seminar with students responsible for preparing and leading class discussion each week. Coursework will include weekly reading and film viewing, oral presentations, papers and tests. Prerequisites: Three intermediate liberal arts (HSS LVA CVA)

4.00 credits

FLM4615 - FILM GENRE

FILM GENRE

FLM4615: Film Genre 2 advanced liberal arts credit The stories a culture repeatedly tells itself about itself are the stories that culture needs in order to address cultural values, aspirations and anxieties. Genre films have been a staple of American movie production since the beginnings of cinema history. This course will consider how and why three popular genres have endured and evolved from the beginning of the Hollywood sound era in the 1930s to recent times. For each genre, we will view, read about and discuss one classic instance of the form and one or two genre transformations. The course will be run as a seminar with students responsible for preparing and leading class discussion each week. Coursework will include weekly reading, film viewing and writing; oral presentations; a paper and a final. Prerequisite: 3 intermediate liberal arts (any combination of HSS, CVA, LVA)

2.00 credits

FLM4691 - CLASS GENDER ROMANCE IN AMER COMIC FILM

CLASS GENDER ROMANCE IN AMER COMIC FILM

FLM4691 Class, Gender, and Romance in American Comic Film (Advanced Liberal Arts) As a narrative form, comedy serves purposes beyond making us laugh. This course will explore how American film comedy reflects cultural values about romance, class, and gender. Through film viewing, reading, and discussion, we will consider how American cinema from the silent era to the present has reflected and presented American class consciousness and mobility, the romance myth, and gender representation. The readings will explore narrative theories and analytical models that address the purposes and strategies of comic form. Course requirements include response journals, class presentation and discussion, one short paper and a final exam. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (CVA, LVA, or HSS)

2.00 credits