Arts and Humanities Course Listing

FRN2200 - FRENCH I & II ACCEL ELEMENTARY FRENCH

FRENCH I & II ACCEL ELEMENTARY FRENCH

FRN2200 French I (Free elective) This fast-paced beginner course emphasizes real-world applications of the French language. Through a variety of authentic materials and in-class activities, students develop their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students will also learn about a variety of francophone cultures. Not open to native speakers. Prerequisites: NONE

4.00 credits

FRN4620 - FRENCH III

FRENCH III

FRN4620 French III (Advanced Liberal Arts) This Intermediate-level course allows students to continue to develop their proficiency in French. The course focuses on improving written and spoken expression in a variety of real-world situations. There is also a strong cultural component, and authentic texts such as films, songs, articles, and stories will provide students with opportunities to learn about the francophone world. Not open to fluent speakers of French. Prerequisites: FRN2200, or equivalent proficiency as demonstrated through a required placement test. Not open to fluent speakers of French.

4.00 credits

FRN4630 - FRENCH IV:INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

FRENCH IV:INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

FRN4630 French IV (Advanced Liberal Arts) A continuation of the fall semester, this course integrates the feature-length film "Le Chemin du retour" with a high level intermediate textbook. The film provides students with an immersion in French language and Francophone culture as they follow the story of a young television journalist in her search to find out more about her grandfather's hidden past during the German occupation of France in World War II, one of the most important historical events in 20th century France. It provides students with opportunities for linguistic and cultural growth, as well as a context for critical thinking. Prerequisite:FRN2200 or FRN2600 (Intermediate French I at Babson, or equivalent program demonstrated through a required placement test, or permission of the instructor. Not open to native speakers of French.) This course is typically offered in the Spring.

4.00 credits

FRN4640 - FRENCH CINEMA AND CULTURE

FRENCH CINEMA AND CULTURE

FRN4640 French Cinema and Culture (Advanced Liberal Arts) This course is designed as an advanced-level conversation class, with a strong cultural component. The major course materials are French films and supplementary readings. These films and readings serve as the basis for debate, discussion and written analysis of issues relevant to the history, culture and politics of France and the francophone world of North Africa and the Caribbean, with a focus on global issues of social concern. This course is designed for students who have mastered the grammatical structures of French, although there will be review of grammar as needed. This course is not open to native speakers. Prerequisites: FRN FRN4620, or equivalent proficiency as demonstrated through a required placement test.

4.00 credits

GDR4620 - THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE

THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE

GDR THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE 2 credit advanced liberal arts This course will institutionalize the work of the Gender Film Initiative, a project born out of CWEL with the goal of producing short films focused on gender issues in the classroom to be used in Babson FME classes. In this course, students will engage with gender theory as well as learn techniques for creating characters, developing conflict, and crafting plot for a short film script. Students will, by courses end, develop a script for a ten-minute film and will be responsible for the rehearsal, production, and post-production work of the film. A secondary, long-term goal of the course is to market the film for use in other Babson courses and, perhaps, to other academic institutions. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS LVA CVA) Typically offered in fall and spring.

2.00 credits

HUM4600 - SEMINAR IN HUMAN RIGHTS (LIT)

SEMINAR IN HUMAN RIGHTS (LIT)

HUM4600 Seminar in Human Rights 2 credit advanced liberal arts This seminar will explore the concept of human rights from its origins to the present, paying particular attention to the international human rights apparatus that emerged in the wake of WWII. Students will learn about different categories of rights (civil and political; economic, social, and cultural) and about the global distribution of rights. Questions to be explored include: How have individuals and groups claimed rights in different times and places? How has the category human been used to include or exclude people from human rights protections? What happens when the rhetoric of human rights is mobilized by governments or other actors as a cover for intervention or abuses? What are the ethics of representing human rights violations in media and cultural texts such as novels and films? The main project for the course will be an intensive human rights practicum in which students will apply their knowledge of dignity and rights to a human rights issue, problem, or organization. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate courses (CVA, LVA, HSS)

2.00 credits

HUM4610 - AMERICAN TRANSCENDENTALISM

AMERICAN TRANSCENDENTALISM

HUM4610 American Transcendentalism 4 credit Advanced Liberal Arts If I were a Bostonian, I think I would be a Transcendentalist (Charles Dickens in American Notes). Nineteenth-century American Transcendentalism, rooted in New England, began as a revolt against theological dogma, but evolved, by mid-century, into what one might call an often-perplexing philosophy of the spirit, focused on the authenticity of the human self and community. An important component of its inquiry was the question of the private v. public: the emphasis on the development of self-culture not as hermetic or narcissistic, but rather as exemplary, with an end towards strengthening the community as a whole. Central to Transcendentalist thought, as well, was the commitment to action, in moving through the physical world, with philosophical inquiry into self-knowledge being the central informant of that action. Such commitment would require an acknowledgment and understanding of ones own genius, the development of a direct and unmediated relationship with Nature, and a more nuanced, less certain understanding of the religious impulse. Transcendentalism took its most potent form in the literary writings of many of the region's writers, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and (at a further remove) Emily Dickinson. In this course, we will focus on an in-depth analysis of the writings of these authors (as well as a passing acquaintance with others), in order to deepen our understanding of the Transcendentalist vision. Our study of these texts will be invigorated by field trips to the Emerson homestead in Concord, and to Walden Pond (including a visit to a replica of Thoreaus self-built, one-room house), the sites of which will allow us to immerse ourselves, at least for a short time, in the deeply creative context of an age that resonates in the American creative spirit to this day. Prerequisite: Any combination of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (HSS LVA CVA)

4.00 credits

HUM4611 - LATIN AMERICAN FICTION AND FILM

LATIN AMERICAN FICTION AND FILM

HUM4611: Current Issues in Latin American Fiction and Film 4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credit Latin American society, politics, and economics have undergone dramatic transformations over the last fifty years. In this seminar, we will study fiction and films that examine the changing political and cultural landscapes of these countries. Beginning with the Latin American Boom in the 1960s and 70s and continuing to the present, we will study a wide range of short stories, novels, plays and films that demonstrate the innovations and rich contributions of contemporary Latin American writers and filmmakers. How do these works explore critical questions of identity and meaning within Latin America and in a more global context? How do they portray and problematize vexing questions surrounding dictatorships and their aftermath, power and poverty, drug trafficking, violence, and migration? In what ways can they inform our understanding of the human condition more broadly? This advanced liberal arts elective fulfills the 4600-level graduation requirement. It also helps satisfy requirements for the following five concentrations: Global and Regional Studies; Identity and Diversity; Justice, Citizenship and Social Responsibility; Literary and Visual Arts; Social and Cultural Studies. Any works originally in Spanish will be taught in (English) translation. Prerequisites: Any combinations of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (HSS, LVA, CVA)

4.00 credits

HUM4614 - POSTMODERNISM: FUTURE CULTURE

POSTMODERNISM: FUTURE CULTURE

HUM 4614: Postmodernism: Future Culture 4 Credit Advanced Liberal Arts (Elective Abroad) This course explores postmodern culture as a strange obsession with the future. Thus we will use the captivating cityscape of Dubaiits unparalleled architecture, its accelerated movement and fragmented spatial organization, the provocative visual design behind its many tourist sitesin order to track crucial ideas of simulation, virtuality, and the spectacle in our postmodern era. Moreover, we will navigate contemporary works of literature, philosophy, film, and architecture while making several excursions into Dubai as a constructed cultural zone of the Middle East. Ultimately, this rare immersion in perhaps the most futuristic place on earth will provide us a dynamic outlook on how postmodern culture blurs the boundaries of reality itself. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts course (CVA, LVA, HSS in any combination) and Acceptance into the course

4.00 credits

HUM4615 - THE CITY AS TEXT: BARCELONA AND MADRID

THE CITY AS TEXT: BARCELONA AND MADRID

HUM 4615 The City as Text: Mapping Cultural Histories in Barcelona and Madrid 4 Advanced Liberal Arts credits Program fee is paid to Glavin Office program fee includes: accommodations, breakfast, metro passes in Madrid and Barcelona, airport and train transports in country, program planned meals, and cultural excursions. Not included: tuition, international flight, visa costs, additional meals and personal expenses. This course is framed as City as Text because the city becomes our laboratory and our classroom - an extended text not limited to what is housed in a library; rather we will learn first-hand through direct encounters with each citys public places and often more hidden histories. Approaching these two cities from a design thinking perspective, each day includes explorative mapping of the city as a source and outgrowth of invention and creativity. In this course, we will consider the social and political history of both cities by actively examining the characteristics and innovations of their urban spaces. Why is each city designed as it is? How has it changed, and in response to what factors? We will delve critically into how Barcelona and Madrid have sought to market or brand their images, and delving into the cityscape what constitutes genuine tradition versus touristic or nationalistic myths. Students will conduct field research in various neighborhoods, using strategies like trendspotting and coolhunting to consider how the use of urban space and its potential are being redefined through restaurants and food markets, art and architecture, fashion and culture, and smart uses of technology. A key part of this course for students will be the opportunity participate in their own choice of what to read -- neighborhood mapping; observation decision making; which foods to try; interesting pathways. Prerequisites: 3 intermediate liberal arts (LVA, CVA, HSS in any combination) and admittance into the course.

4.00 credits

HUM4616 - FROM THE FRENCH REVOLUTION TO THE SEXUAL

FROM THE FRENCH REVOLUTION TO THE SEXUAL

HUM4616 From the French Revolution to the Sexual Revolution 4 credit advanced liberal arts Patriots of the French Revolution demanded equality of rights and opportunity before the law, that is, they dreamt of political democracy. The first half of our course will focus on the French Revolution and will give you the opportunity to work in teams and role-play major historical players in the first phases of the French Revolutions attempt to establish equality. (Students are unanimous in their enthusiasm for the role-playing component of this course.) Another kind of dream, the dream for democracy in intimate relations, also took shape at this time through a process much less visible. Whereas the first revolution was largely a male project, in the second women played the primary role. In the second half of the course we will study the history of the sexual revolution by reading biographical and historical essays, as well as a play that boldly dramatizes the struggle, Strindbergs Miss Julie. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS LVA CVA)

4.00 credits

HUM4620 - CONSTRUCTING AND PERFORMING THE SELF

CONSTRUCTING AND PERFORMING THE SELF

HUM4620 Constructing and Performing the Self 4 credits (advanced liberal arts) In Constructing and Performing the Self students will examine and attempt to answer the most fundamental of questions: Who am I? A question this significant cannot be adequately answered by any one approach, thus the course brings together two very different approaches to guide the investigation. Psychological studies of identity marshal the tools and methods of science to develop and test theories that describe and explain the self. Theater studies bring interpretative and aesthetic perspectives to represent and reveal identity. In this course, these two approaches will be purposely inter-mingled: the questions asked and the answers derived will be informed equally by psychology and theater. Students will see, on a daily basis, how each field informs, supports, and speaks to the other. While there are some class sessions and assignments explicitly grounded in only one field to build students fluency, the major activities of the semester will require both. Given how personally applicable both psychology and theater are, students own sense of identity will be the central text in this course. Like Tom in The Glass Menagerie, students are both the main character in their own life stories and also the narrator of them. This course aims for true interdisciplinary integration, and students will be called upon to use and apply the theoretical work as they build and create an original solo performance about a key moment in their lives. Our hope is that by semesters end students will have taken a concrete step forward in understanding and articulating their sense of self and feel comfortable and confident in their ability to perform for a live, public audience. Students are asked to alternate between four roles in this course: scholar, writer, actor, and critic. Scholars consume information in analytical ways and produce new knowledge that is deeply grounded in their foundational knowledge. Writers produce new works, both analytical and creative, that take a novel position and support it. Actors give life to both old and new characters, conveying their shifting objectives over time to impact an audience. Critics evaluate texts (in our case, performances) with a constructive, thoughtful, and respectful approach that brings new insights. Some days students will only adopt one role, others students will be asked to oscillate between the them. Prerequisites: RHT & Any combination of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (LVA/CVA/HSS)

4.00 credits

HUM4625 - ADVANCED QUEER THEORY

ADVANCED QUEER THEORY

HUM4625 Advanced Queer Theory 4 credit advanced liberal arts The course examines the difference between LBGTQ studies and LBGTQ theory. Put simplyand perhaps too simplyLBGTQ studies could be thought of as the study of LBGTQ people. The problem with this definition, though, is that it assumes we know who and what we are talking about, not only on the individual level of each of the letters in the acronym (we know what the lesbian is, etc), but also on the group level of the acronym itself (we know what defines the LBGTQ community as a whole). Conversely, LBGTQ theory puts this know-ability under the microscope. It investigates the assumptions about how sexual acts come to define the people participating in them.

4.00 credits

HUM4630 - EXTREMISM

EXTREMISM

HUM4630 Extremism: The Fanatic, The Militant, The Sectarian 4 credit advanced Liberal Arts This course is committed to exploring extremism through the formation of dangerous sects: i.e. underground movements, secret societies, forbidden associations, cult gatherings, urban gangs, martial arts orders, outlawed artistic circles, rebel cadres, and terrorist units. We will use contemporary literary works from around the world to examine the way in which these dangerous, hidden alliances experiment with ideas of concealment, seduction, power, strangeness, and sacrifice in order to create antagonistic counter-currents to everyday society. We will therefore also study the many forms that such outsider factions can take as they banish themselves and plan their hostile-ecstatic return to the surface: revolutionary, criminal, religious, mystical, magical, and avant-garde. Ultimately, this topic will allow us to penetrate one of the darker quarters of the human imagination in the modern age, following the extremist mind into its most subterranean possibilities, where a certain intense passion/hatred toward the world allows one to generate an alternative reality of the most excessive nature. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (HSS, LVA, CVA)

4.00 credits

JPN2200 - JAPANESE I: JAPANESE LANG AND CULTURE I

JAPANESE I: JAPANESE LANG AND CULTURE I

JPN2200 Elementary Japanese Language and Culture I (Free elective) An introduction to a practical and functional knowledge of Japanese as it is used in contemporary society. Students will learn the fundamental use of the Japanese language by exercising all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Two basic writing systems, hiragana and katakana and some kanji, are taught to promote literacy in Japanese environments. An introduction to Japanese culture, which is inseparable from learning the language, is provided through demonstrations, videos, and films. Students are required to do at least two projects which introduce some aspect of Japanese culture. Prerequisite: None

0.00 credits