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Arts and Humanities Course Listing

FLM4615 - FILM GENRE

FILM GENRE

FLM4615: Film Genre 2 advanced liberal arts credit The stories a culture repeatedly tells itself about itself are the stories that culture needs in order to address cultural values, aspirations and anxieties. Genre films have been a staple of American movie production since the beginnings of cinema history. This course will consider how and why three popular genres have endured and evolved from the beginning of the Hollywood sound era in the 1930s to recent times. For each genre, we will view, read about and discuss one classic instance of the form and one or two genre transformations. The course will be run as a seminar with students responsible for preparing and leading class discussion each week. Coursework will include weekly reading, film viewing and writing; oral presentations; a paper and a final. Prerequisite: 3 intermediate liberal arts (any combination of HSS, CVA, LVA)

2.00 credits

FLM4671 - COMIC FORM IN FILM

COMIC FORM IN FILM

FLM4671: Comic Form in Film 4 advanced liberal arts credits This course explores the history and theory of comic form as it applies to movies from the silent film era to the present. Beginning with silent comedies and progressing to more recent films, we will consider such topics as comedys roots in ancient ritual; recurring comic character types and genre conventions; irony, satire, anarchy, and surrealism as comic principles; and dark comedy. Course readings will introduce students to narrative theories, aesthetic and philosophical questions, and analytical models that address the purposes and strategies of comic form. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS/LVA/CVA)

4.00 credits

FLM4691 - CLASS GENDER ROMANCE IN AMER COMIC FILM

CLASS GENDER ROMANCE IN AMER COMIC FILM

FLM4691 Class, Gender, and Romance in American Comic Film (Advanced Liberal Arts) As a narrative form, comedy serves purposes beyond making us laugh. This course will explore how American film comedy reflects cultural values about romance, class, and gender. Through film viewing, reading, and discussion, we will consider how American cinema from the silent era to the present has reflected and presented American class consciousness and mobility, the romance myth, and gender representation. The readings will explore narrative theories and analytical models that address the purposes and strategies of comic form. Course requirements include response journals, class presentation and discussion, one short paper and a final exam. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (CVA, LVA, or HSS)

2.00 credits

FRN2200 - FRENCH I

FRENCH I

FRN2200 French I (Free elective) This fast-paced beginner course emphasizes real-world applications of the French language. Through a variety of authentic materials and in-class activities, students develop their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Students will also learn about a variety of francophone cultures. Not open to native speakers. Prerequisites: NONE

4.00 credits

FRN4610 - FRENCH II

FRENCH II

FRN4610: French II 4 advanced liberal arts credits FRN4610 French II is a fast-paced course that builds on the knowledge gained in FRN2200 French I. Students will continue to expand their vocabulary and communication skills as they gain confidence in their abilities to communicate in spoken and written French. Conversation and listening activities in class will be supplemented by a variety of readings and written assignments. In addition, discussions of authentic texts, short films, and cultural experiences will help students gain a deeper appreciation for French and Francophone people and cultures. Prerequisites: FRN2200 French I, or similar proficiency as indicated by a placement test. Not open to fluent speakers of French

4.00 credits

FRN4620 - INTOUCHABLES:MAP CONTEM FRANCE MEDIA

INTOUCHABLES:MAP CONTEM FRANCE MEDIA

FRN4620: Intouchables: Mapping Contemporary France through Media &Arts (Previously titled: French III) (Advanced Liberal Arts) French III is an intermediate course, building oral and written communication skills. This course considers major issues in contemporary France as discussed through cinema, short stories, and news articles. The French movie Intouchables -- touching on social issues while also being a film beloved by many serves as a point of departure Not open to fluent speakers of French. Prerequisites: FRN2200, or equivalent proficiency as demonstrated through a required placement test. Not open to fluent speakers of French.

4.00 credits

FRN4630 - FRENCH IV:INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

FRENCH IV:INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II

FRN4630 French IV (Advanced Liberal Arts) A continuation of the fall semester, this course integrates the feature-length film "Le Chemin du retour" with a high level intermediate textbook. The film provides students with an immersion in French language and Francophone culture as they follow the story of a young television journalist in her search to find out more about her grandfather's hidden past during the German occupation of France in World War II, one of the most important historical events in 20th century France. It provides students with opportunities for linguistic and cultural growth, as well as a context for critical thinking. Prerequisite:FRN2200 or FRN2600 (Intermediate French I at Babson, or equivalent program demonstrated through a required placement test, or permission of the instructor. Not open to native speakers of French.) This course is typically offered in the Spring.

4.00 credits

FRN4640 - FRENCH CINEMA AND CULTURE

FRENCH CINEMA AND CULTURE

FRN4640 French Cinema and Culture (Advanced Liberal Arts) This course is designed as an advanced-level conversation class, with a strong cultural component. The major course materials are French films and supplementary readings. These films and readings serve as the basis for debate, discussion and written analysis of issues relevant to the history, culture and politics of France and the francophone world of North Africa and the Caribbean, with a focus on global issues of social concern. This course is designed for students who have mastered the grammatical structures of French, although there will be review of grammar as needed. This course is not open to native speakers. Prerequisites: FRN FRN4620, or equivalent proficiency as demonstrated through a required placement test.

4.00 credits

GDR4620 - THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE

THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE

GDR THE GENDER FILM INITIATIVE 2 credit advanced liberal arts This course will institutionalize the work of the Gender Film Initiative, a project born out of CWEL with the goal of producing short films focused on gender issues in the classroom to be used in Babson FME classes. In this course, students will engage with gender theory as well as learn techniques for creating characters, developing conflict, and crafting plot for a short film script. Students will, by courses end, develop a script for a ten-minute film and will be responsible for the rehearsal, production, and post-production work of the film. A secondary, long-term goal of the course is to market the film for use in other Babson courses and, perhaps, to other academic institutions. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS LVA CVA) Typically offered in fall and spring.

2.00 credits

HUM4600 - SEMINAR IN HUMAN RIGHTS (LIT)

SEMINAR IN HUMAN RIGHTS (LIT)

HUM4600 Seminar in Human Rights 2 credit advanced liberal arts This seminar will explore the concept of human rights from its origins to the present, paying particular attention to the international human rights apparatus that emerged in the wake of WWII. Students will learn about different categories of rights (civil and political; economic, social, and cultural) and about the global distribution of rights. Questions to be explored include: How have individuals and groups claimed rights in different times and places? How has the category human been used to include or exclude people from human rights protections? What happens when the rhetoric of human rights is mobilized by governments or other actors as a cover for intervention or abuses? What are the ethics of representing human rights violations in media and cultural texts such as novels and films? The main project for the course will be an intensive human rights practicum in which students will apply their knowledge of dignity and rights to a human rights issue, problem, or organization. Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate courses (CVA, LVA, HSS)

2.00 credits

HUM4605 - THE NATURE,CULTURE, AND FUTURE OF WORK

THE NATURE,CULTURE, AND FUTURE OF WORK

HUM4605: The Nature, Culture and Future of Work 4 advanced liberal arts credits This interdisciplinary course examines work from the standpoints of cultural history and organizational behavior. We will explore work as a marker of identity, work as a cultural construct, and work as an ideological and structural apparatus. The course will be organized around weekly film viewings and readings. The films will frame our exploration of work and serve both as cultural artifacts that represent American ideologies and case studies of particular work situations and perspectives. The readings will offer a range of theoretical and historical views from a variety of disciplines: cultural and film history, organizational behavior, economics, management theory, sociology, and others. Among the questions the course will address are: To what extent does what we do professionally define who we are? What, if anything, do we expect of our jobs beyond a paycheck? What, if anything, do our jobs expect of us beyond our skill and time? What is the difference between work as a job, a career and a calling? How do American ideologies conflate professional achievement with success? In what ways are some organizational structures more conducive than others to contentment at work? What does it mean to opt out of or strive not to work? What is the past, present and future of work in America? Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS, LVA, CVA)

4.00 credits

HUM4610 - AMERICAN TRANSCENDENTALISM

AMERICAN TRANSCENDENTALISM

HUM4610 American Transcendentalism 4 credit Advanced Liberal Arts If I were a Bostonian, I think I would be a Transcendentalist (Charles Dickens in American Notes). Nineteenth-century American Transcendentalism, rooted in New England, began as a revolt against theological dogma, but evolved, by mid-century, into what one might call an often-perplexing philosophy of the spirit, focused on the authenticity of the human self and community. An important component of its inquiry was the question of the private v. public: the emphasis on the development of self-culture not as hermetic or narcissistic, but rather as exemplary, with an end towards strengthening the community as a whole. Central to Transcendentalist thought, as well, was the commitment to action, in moving through the physical world, with philosophical inquiry into self-knowledge being the central informant of that action. Such commitment would require an acknowledgment and understanding of ones own genius, the development of a direct and unmediated relationship with Nature, and a more nuanced, less certain understanding of the religious impulse. Transcendentalism took its most potent form in the literary writings of many of the region's writers, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and (at a further remove) Emily Dickinson. In this course, we will focus on an in-depth analysis of the writings of these authors (as well as a passing acquaintance with others), in order to deepen our understanding of the Transcendentalist vision. Our study of these texts will be invigorated by field trips to the Emerson homestead in Concord, and to Walden Pond (including a visit to a replica of Thoreaus self-built, one-room house), the sites of which will allow us to immerse ourselves, at least for a short time, in the deeply creative context of an age that resonates in the American creative spirit to this day. Prerequisite: Any combination of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (HSS LVA CVA)

4.00 credits

HUM4611 - LATIN AMERICAN FICTION AND FILM

LATIN AMERICAN FICTION AND FILM

HUM4611: Current Issues in Latin American Fiction and Film 4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credit Latin American society, politics, and economics have undergone dramatic transformations over the last fifty years. In this seminar, we will study fiction and films that examine the changing political and cultural landscapes of these countries. Beginning with the Latin American Boom in the 1960s and 70s and continuing to the present, we will study a wide range of short stories, novels, plays and films that demonstrate the innovations and rich contributions of contemporary Latin American writers and filmmakers. How do these works explore critical questions of identity and meaning within Latin America and in a more global context? How do they portray and problematize vexing questions surrounding dictatorships and their aftermath, power and poverty, drug trafficking, violence, and migration? In what ways can they inform our understanding of the human condition more broadly? This advanced liberal arts elective fulfills the 4600-level graduation requirement. It also helps satisfy requirements for the following five concentrations: Global and Regional Studies; Identity and Diversity; Justice, Citizenship and Social Responsibility; Literary and Visual Arts; Social and Cultural Studies. Any works originally in Spanish will be taught in (English) translation. Prerequisites: Any combinations of 3 Intermediate Liberal Arts (HSS, LVA, CVA)

4.00 credits

HUM4614 - POSTMODERNISM: FUTURE CULTURE

POSTMODERNISM: FUTURE CULTURE

HUM 4614: Postmodernism: Future Culture 4 Credit Advanced Liberal Arts (Elective Abroad) This course explores postmodern culture as a strange obsession with the future. Thus we will use the captivating cityscape of Dubaiits unparalleled architecture, its accelerated movement and fragmented spatial organization, the provocative visual design behind its many tourist sitesin order to track crucial ideas of simulation, virtuality, and the spectacle in our postmodern era. Moreover, we will navigate contemporary works of literature, philosophy, film, and architecture while making several excursions into Dubai as a constructed cultural zone of the Middle East. Ultimately, this rare immersion in perhaps the most futuristic place on earth will provide us a dynamic outlook on how postmodern culture blurs the boundaries of reality itself. Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts course (CVA, LVA, HSS in any combination) and Acceptance into the course

4.00 credits

HUM4615 - THE CITY AS TEXT: BARCELONA AND MADRID

THE CITY AS TEXT: BARCELONA AND MADRID

HUM 4615 The City as Text: Mapping Cultural Histories in Barcelona and Madrid 4 Advanced Liberal Arts credits Program fee is paid to Glavin Office program fee includes: accommodations, breakfast, metro passes in Madrid and Barcelona, airport and train transports in country, program planned meals, and cultural excursions. Not included: tuition, international flight, visa costs, additional meals and personal expenses. This course is framed as City as Text because the city becomes our laboratory and our classroom - an extended text not limited to what is housed in a library; rather we will learn first-hand through direct encounters with each citys public places and often more hidden histories. Approaching these two cities from a design thinking perspective, each day includes explorative mapping of the city as a source and outgrowth of invention and creativity. In this course, we will consider the social and political history of both cities by actively examining the characteristics and innovations of their urban spaces. Why is each city designed as it is? How has it changed, and in response to what factors? We will delve critically into how Barcelona and Madrid have sought to market or brand their images, and delving into the cityscape what constitutes genuine tradition versus touristic or nationalistic myths. Students will conduct field research in various neighborhoods, using strategies like trendspotting and coolhunting to consider how the use of urban space and its potential are being redefined through restaurants and food markets, art and architecture, fashion and culture, and smart uses of technology. A key part of this course for students will be the opportunity participate in their own choice of what to read -- neighborhood mapping; observation decision making; which foods to try; interesting pathways. Prerequisites: 3 intermediate liberal arts (LVA, CVA, HSS in any combination) and admittance into the course.

4.00 credits