Arts and Humanities Course Listing

LVA2004 - LOVE, SEX AND FAMILY 20TH CENTURY AMERIC

LOVE, SEX AND FAMILY 20TH CENTURY AMERIC

LVA2004 Love, Sex and the Family in Mid-Twentieth-Century American Literature 4 credit intermediate liberal arts "First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes baby in the baby carriage." This childhood ditty seems to inculcate the "right" order of things in the act of family-making in America. But lives played out in times of cultural transition aren't always as neat as nursery rhymes. Mid-twentieth-century America was characterized by changing gender roles and definitions, geographic and demographic shifts, war, and burgeoning technology, among other things. This course looks at fiction and drama to see how great American authors such as Tennessee Williams, Flannery O'Connor and Richard Yates portrayed and, perhaps, shaped the mid-century American understanding of love, sex, and family. We will supplement literary readings with relevant non-fiction from the time period. Students will propose, research, and develop a major essay about an author and/or a concept related to the course materials. Students will also formally present their ideas to the class. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2005 - ART AS A VISUAL LANGUAGE

ART AS A VISUAL LANGUAGE

LVA2005 Art as a Visual Language (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course is designed to introduce you to the realm of visual communication - how it's done, how it works and how cultural and personal experiences shape your reactions to it. Fine arts (painting, sculpture, architecture), industrial arts (graphic and product design) and everyday objects will be presented as the workings of visual communication, the role of art and artists in a variety of times and places, the nature of good and bad art and design are explored. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2006 - RUSSIA IN MODERNITY

RUSSIA IN MODERNITY

LVA2006 Russia in Modernity: History Politics and Culture 4 credit intermediate liberal arts Offered to students in the BRIC Program

4.00 credits

LVA2009 - AMERICAN FILM HISTORY

AMERICAN FILM HISTORY

LVA2009 American Film History 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) American Film History offers an overview of the history and theory of Hollywood movies while exploring the basic cinematic techniques used by film directors to express their ideas and tell their stories. The course proceeds chronologically starting in the 1920s silent era. The goals of the course include introducing students to film history, theory, and terminology while simultaneously considering the relation between cultural values and popular culture forms. American Film History will equip students to view movies as points of intersection for artistic intent, cultural myth-making, individual and social identity formation, and ideology. Students will view one film per week, They will also be expected to read and learn terminology in preparation for each class. Other assignments include written work, quizzes, a midterm, and a final. American Film History is an intermediate course that fulfills the Literary and Visual Arts (LVA) requirement. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000 This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2010 - AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT

AFRICAN AMERICAN LIT

LVA2010 African American Literature This course will introduce students to the African American literary tradition starting with the slave narrative and concluding with contemporary literary production. Along the way, we will consider the move from oral to written literatures, the aesthetic forms created and adapted by African American writers, and the role of African American letters in chronicling and shaping the experience of African American people. Our study will be informed by major historical moments slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, the Great Migration from south to north, the Civil Rights and post-Civil rights erasand we will read work by writers such as Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Gwendolyn Brooks, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison. Prerequisites: AHS Foundation and RHT

4.00 credits

LVA2012 - BORDERLINES:EXPLOR TRANSAT AMERICAN LIT

BORDERLINES:EXPLOR TRANSAT AMERICAN LIT

LVA2012 Borderlines: Exploring Transnationalism in American Literature 4 Intermediate Liberal Arts In his inaugural address, Donald Trump promised that he would bring back our borders. In one sense a paradoxical notionthe idea that patrolled national borders could wander off, get lost, vanishit speaks directly towards widespread anxiety about the ways in which globalization and mobility erase borders, rendering the nation vulnerable to outside threats. In this course, we will aim to deepen our understanding of the border: how we should conceive of it, what relations or ideology it enforces or conceals, the extent to which it is a fiction, the extent to which it is necessary. We will do this by examining literature that imagines and represents ways in which borders function and fail, serve as zones of contact, are crossed or reinforced. These texts are broadly understood as transnationalthat is, thinking across (not simply within) the idea of the nation. In Unit I, we will examine works of literature that focus on bordersthe work they do, the spaces they create, and the hybrid identities they produce. In Unit II, we will zoom out to consider transnational or hemispheric networks and exchanges (of persons, commodities, cultures, etc.). In so doing, we will consider in particular how works of art represent and can help us understand the globalized world in which we live. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2013 - GLOBAL CINEMA

GLOBAL CINEMA

LVA2013 Global Cinema (4 credit Intermediate Liberal Arts) Global Cinema provides an overview of the history and aesthetics of films from Europe, Asia, Africa and South America. Students will analyze films as cultural artifacts and will consider the interrelationship among various national film movements and aesthetic approaches. Weekly film viewings will be complemented by readings in the history and practice of several national cinemas and of post-colonial, transnational cinemas. Films are in their original language with English subtitles. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000 This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2014 - MONEY AND LITERATURE

MONEY AND LITERATURE

LVA2014: Money and Literature 4 intermediate liberal arts This course looks at money and economic thinking in literature. We will examine works from a wide range of periods and genres, with a strong grounding in fiction and drama from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Aesthetic genres such as naturalism, modernism, post-modernism, and expressionism will be considered in terms of how they inform and are informed by thinking about money. There will also be contextual/theoretical readings from Marx, Benjamin, Simmel, Freud, Lacan, and others. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2015 - TRUTHFUL FICTIONS:BIOGRAPH NOVEL,MEMOIR

TRUTHFUL FICTIONS:BIOGRAPH NOVEL,MEMOIR

LVA2015: Truthful Fictions: Biographical Novel, Memoir & Biopic 4 Intermediate liberal arts credits What do works as disparate as Lin-Manuel Mirandas Hamilton, Spike Lees Black KkKlansman, Colum McCanns novel Transatlantic, Craig Gillespies I, Tonya and Tara Westovers memoir, Educated have in common? The past two decades have produced a remarkable surge in biographical fictions (what Alaine Buisine coined biofictions in 1991). Similarly, as three-time memoirist Mary Karr argues, memoir is in its heyday, with a massive increase in readership in the past twenty years or so. And the popularity of biopics, defined by George Custen as films minimally composed of a life or portion of a life of a real person have become a tidal wave that threatens to spill over into tsunami. What explains why true life stories have become the go-to dinner for fiction writers? In this course, we will explore how memory and forgetting, experience and perception, fact and invention, public and private history, personal relationships, social and political forces intersect in these popular literary and cinematic forms. We will examine the myriad ways authors and directors construct an auto/biographical self, how these may differ from the selves of lived experience, and what this suggests about how we navigate a world in which truth is often questioned and fiction may achieve an honesty that more purportedly truthful narratives fail to convey. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2016 - VIOLENCE:THEORIES OF CRUELTY,EVIL INHUMA

VIOLENCE:THEORIES OF CRUELTY,EVIL INHUMA

LVA2016 Violence: Theories of Cruelty, Evil, and the Inhuman 4 credit intermediate liberal arts This course will investigate the idea of violence across an extensive spectrum of authors, texts, films, and literary-philosophical perspectives from the East and the West. We seek not merely to engage in a conventional critique but to exceed the boundaries of our embedded understanding by also contemplating this concept's fascinating potential as a form of literary imagination and intellectual expression. Topics will therefore include cruelty, vulnerability, power, betrayal, destruction, vengeance, anger, terror, defacement, pain, disaster, and inhumanity. From the poetics of torture to the damaged writings of war, from theoretical works on catastrophe to cinematic and artistic pieces on the nature of evil, the intent is to explore the many narratives that have emerged across the global horizon in the face of an often violent experience of the modern world. Prerequisites: AHS Foundation and RHT I & II

4.00 credits

LVA2020 - SONS AND DAUGHTERS IN FICTION MEM

SONS AND DAUGHTERS IN FICTION MEM

LVA2020 Sons and Daughters in Fiction and Memoir 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) In this literature course we will explore relations between parents and children as represented in fiction (including plays) and memoirs from a variety of cultures and eras. We will assume that in successful childhood development, a child moves in a complex process from attachment and identification with parental figures, through separation, to autonomy. Because of particular parents or other circumstances, however, the developmental process can be thwarted. We will examine individuals emerging from harmful childhood relational patterns who are struggling to remake themselves in the context of more constructive relations, or through the act of writing itself. This course will develop your confidence to be able to read, analyze, and write about literature, and to explore its relevance to your own lives. Readings will likely include Jamaica Kincaid, Annie John or My Brother; Franz Kafka, The Sons; Kathryn Harrison, The Kiss: A Memoir; Shakespeare, Hamlet; and Emily Bront, Wuthering Heights; selected short stories. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2022 - THE SPECULATIVE GENRES

THE SPECULATIVE GENRES

LVA2022 The Speculative Genres: Horror, Sci-Fi and Fantasy Literature and Film 4 credit intermediate liberal arts The modern speculative genres Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror engage audiences in difficult ethical and philosophical discussions. We will look at a great many themes in speculative storytelling, paying special attention to eugenics, representations of the human body, personhood and consciousness, and what it means to be a monster. We will explore texts as widely diverse as Marquezs The Autumn of the Patriarch, Katherine Dunns Geek Love, The Avengers and Bethesda Softworks Fallout franchise. Along the way, well talk about women in gamer culture, the acceptance and rejection of diversity in comics (and Marvels innovative remarketing strategy), Godzillas role as a tree-hugging environmentalist, and the ways that speculative fiction has fueled innovation and social change since the Industrial Revolution. Prerequisites: AHS and RHT

4.00 credits

LVA2030 - PLACE AND LANDSCAPE IN LITERATURE

PLACE AND LANDSCAPE IN LITERATURE

LVA2030 Reading Place and Landscape in American Literature 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course investigates the ways American writers use place and landscape in their art. Reading fiction, essays, and poetry beginning in the 19th century and moving to contemporary works, we will explore the nature of place and landscape as physical, social, and intellectual and consider what it suggests about American culture and ideas. We will also look at several theoretical texts by cultural geographers, ecologists, and scholars of landscape architecture and regional planning. Ultimately, we will consider how place and landscape, both real and imagined, influence selected American writers' use of theme, imagery, character, and style, and reflect as well on how these concerns influence our own lives as readers, writers, thinkers, and dreamers. Reading Place and Landscape in American Literature is an intermediate level course and part of the Literary and Visual Arts category of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Courses in this category focus on frameworks for understanding and appreciating the practice of representation, the creative process, and diverse modes of aesthetic expression. They also consider individual, historical, cultural, and formal factors in artistic creation and make manifest the multiple vantage points from which art can be interpreted. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2031 - BUSINESS AND AMERICAN DRAMA

BUSINESS AND AMERICAN DRAMA

LVA2031 Top Performers: Business in American Drama 4 credits (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Ever since Willy Loman walked on stage with his sample cases in Arthur Miller's 1949 masterpiece Death of a Salesman, it has been thought axiomatic that American playwrights have painted a bleak portrait of sales professionals in particular and businesspeople generally. But a close look at American dramatic treatments of business shows something more complicated. Over the past century American playwrights have located in the world of business and the world of drama a shared preoccupation with the sometimes tricky distinctions between word and act, authenticity and performance, the "real" and the symbolic. This course will look at a selection of American plays from the early twentieth century to the present, focusing on those plays' treatment of business and economic life. In addition to close scrutiny of dramatic texts and theatrical performances, we will also explore the role of performance in business. In other words, we'll look at both business in American drama and drama in American business. Your performance will be assessed through two papers, a mid-term and a final exam. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2032 - FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN ART

FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN ART

LVA2432 Foundations of Western Art (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course is designed to introduce students to painting, architecture, and sculpture from the Renaissance to the early 20th century and to give students an understanding of the general principles governing the visual arts. Topics such as the role of the artist, the functions of art in society, and the nature of visual language, among others, will be discussed as major artists and their works are presented in this survey of Western art. Class lectures and discussions are based on the presentation of slides. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits