Arts and Humanities Course Listing

LVA2036 - CONTEMP WORLD LIT:WRITING OF THE UNREAL

CONTEMP WORLD LIT:WRITING OF THE UNREAL

LVA2036 Contemporary World Literature: Writing of the Unreal 4 credit intermediate liberal arts This course examines contemporary world literature through the specific prism of "the unreal." Writers from Latin America, the Caribbean, East Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East will be examined in their rich experiments with surrealism, anti-realism, hyper-realism, and irrealism. Moreover, this course will explore the enigmatic conceptual territories of the dream, the nightmare, the fantasy, the illusion, the hallucination, the mirage, the vision, and the simulation as breakaway zones of the global literary imagination. To achieve this task, we will evaluate authors as diverse as Haruki Murakami, Hassan Blasim, Clarice Lispector, Jose Saramago, Naguib Mahfouz, Kobo Abe, Juan Rulfo, and Reinaldo Arenas, interrogating their different approaches to the creation of phantasmtic, ethereal, and unknown spaces. Prerequisites: RHT II and AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2039 - CURIOSITY IN LITERATURE

CURIOSITY IN LITERATURE

LVA2039 Curiosity in Literature (Intermediate Liberal Art) Curiosity contains within it a contradiction; it is our drive to know battling against our fear of the unknown, and it has played a major role in literature for a very long time. In this course, we will read texts that span several continents and centuries as we study curiosity and ask ourselves myriad questions. Why did the definition of curiosity change from negative to positive in the 14th century? Is curiosity hubristic tinkering or social responsibility? How is curiosity valued? Is the valuation of curiosity dependent on what is being sought? Is curiosity linked to gender? Who is rewarded for possessing it? Who is punished? If curiosity killed the cat, why? We will study Greek Myths and Fairy Tales as well as the following authors: John Milton, Christopher Marlowe, Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Sigmund Freud, Agatha Christie, Anne Sexton, and Patricia Highsmith. We will also view Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2045 - MODERNISM AND THE MAKING OF THE NEW

MODERNISM AND THE MAKING OF THE NEW

LVA2045 Modernism and the Making of the New (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The British novelist Virginia Woolf declared that human nature underwent a fundamental change "on or about December 1910." The first few decades of the twentieth century are characterized by a fervent desire to break with the past and to reject traditions that seemed outmoded and too genteel to suit an era of psychological and technological breakthroughs and violence on a grand scale. This class will look at works that reflect ideas of experimentation, in both form and content, and that engaged new understandings of time, space, and human subjectivity. We will read writers such as Virginia Woolf, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, E.M. Forster, Djuna Barnes, and Katherine Mansfield, as well as the theories of Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein (this is a tentative list). Be prepared; there is a lot of reading. These are difficult and challenging texts that do not rely on straightforward plot and narrative; they require careful analysis and critical engagement. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation H&S and A&H This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2049 - PILGRIMS AND PILGRIMAGE IN LIT

PILGRIMS AND PILGRIMAGE IN LIT

LVA2049 Seeking Enrichment: Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Literature (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The novelist Joyce Carol Oates has said, "To be an American is to be a kind of pilgrim ... a seeker after truth. The pilgrim is our deepest and purest self." In this course we'll explore the character of the pilgrim in selected fiction, essays, and poems, using questions such as: What inspires someone to take and retake pilgrimages: long, often difficult journeys far from home? What friendships and other communities form along the way and why? What besides self-enrichment do pilgrims hope to find, or possibly lose? Through close reading, discussion, and written analyses, we'll study how writers use setting, plot, and theme to consider these questions. There will also be one field trip, which will serve as a local pilgrimage. Course texts may include contemporary works by Kurt Vonnegut, Ursula Le Guin, and Curtis Sittenfeld, as well as selections from Dante, Petrarch, Chaucer,Basho, and Thoreau. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2061 - TALES OF THE CITY

TALES OF THE CITY

LVA2061 Tales of the City: Exploring Urban Literature (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course will focus on the changing and diverse portrayals of cities and urban life in western literature from the earliest days of industrialization to the present. Inspired by Plato's observation, "this City is what it is because our citizens are what they are," we will explore the mutually-constructed relationship between a city and its citizens, asking such questions as: What does it mean to be an urban dweller? How does a city shape its residents' identity, and how do its residents influence a city's development? What are the delights and dangers of urban life? Where does one's sense of community/neighborhood overlap with - and diverge from - living in a particular city? We will read novels, short stories, poems, and essays, focusing primarily on London, but also likely including Dublin and New York City. To what extent can the concerns of a community within a city diverge from the concerns of the city as a whole? Prerequisites: RHT & Foundation A&H and H&S This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2062 - SUBURBAN AMERICA IN LITERATURE AND CULTU

SUBURBAN AMERICA IN LITERATURE AND CULTU

LVA2062 Suburban America in Literature and Culture (Intermediate Liberal Arts) American suburbs are simultaneously reviled as physical spaces comprised of "little boxes made of ticky tacky," churning out homogeneous values and people, and revered as mythically perfect imagined spaces in television sitcoms and advertising. This class aims to examine the American suburbs as constructed through popular texts, classic literature, and contemporary art. We will consider how the tension between utopia and dystopia is imagined and re-imagined over time and across genres and texts, reading and analyzing works such as the poetry of Anne Sexton, Richard Yates' novel Revolutionary Road, and the short stories of John Cheever. We will also examine representations of the suburbs in science fiction and film. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation A&H & H&S This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2067 - FILM AND THE CITY

FILM AND THE CITY

LVA2067 Film and the City (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The birth of cinema coincided with a period of urbanization and a new sense of life in the modern metropolis. From the beginnings of film history to the present, movies have come to grips with the complexities of the urban environment. They have shaped our sense of cities as symbolic sites signifying opportunity, progress, and the promise of social integration but also danger, alienation, and the collision of distinct cultures. Ranging from neon-lit wonderlands to post-apocalyptic wastelands, cinematic cities have mapped our cultural aspirations and anxieties. This course will explore how cities have been represented in movies from the silent era onward. Weekly film viewings will be complemented by readings in film and urban history. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000 This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2069 - UTOPIA AND DYSTOPIA:LIT CULTURAL EXPRES

UTOPIA AND DYSTOPIA:LIT CULTURAL EXPRES

LVA2069 Utopia and Dystopia: Literary and Cultural Expressions 4 credit intermediate liberal This course will examine the difference between ideas of absolute societal perfection and absolute societal imperfection as expressed in literary and cultural texts. Topics of study through such texts will include the ways we govern, the ways we create order, the ways we progress, and the ways we treat others. Over the course of the semester, students will be confronted with a number of questions. What are the elements of a utopia or dystopia? If one is complete perfection and the other complete imperfection both by definition unattainable then why are the concepts even worth talking about, and why have they persisted throughout history and across cultures? And maybe most interestingly, is there much of a real difference between the two? We will read works by Jose Saramago, Cormac McCarthy, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ursula LeGuin, and Margaret Atwood. Prerequisites: AHS and RHT I & II

4.00 credits

LVA2072 - DETECTIVE FICTION,NOIR,SOC CRITICISM

DETECTIVE FICTION,NOIR,SOC CRITICISM

LVA2072 Detective Fiction, Noir, and Social Criticism 4 credit intermediate liberal arts This course explores the uses and genre development of detective fiction and film noir and their functions as social commentary, applying examples from different times and places - in the United States, Latin America, and Europe. What do these works have in common, and what separates them? How do they reflect or interrogate the cultures that produced them? Why has detective fiction (in its various incarnations) remained so popular? We consider revisions of the genre in the so-called hardboiled or serial pulp fiction of the 1930s and 1940s, as well as its representation in film noir. We analyze later versions of the genre through films such as Chinatown and Blade Runner, and recent alterations in neo-noir films, evaluating them in relation to contemporary culture. Short works by canonical Latin American authors such as Borges and Garca Mrquez, among others, provide an introduction to Latin American crime fiction. Through the works of current and popular writers and filmmakers we consider the legacies of dictatorship in Spain and Latin America, and the genres use in investigating and exposing a conflictive past (or fear of what one might find). We will look at the female detective in varied works. How is she different (if she is?) from her male counterparts? And we examine how detective fiction can function to parody or subvert the possibility of an ordered solution, or the completion of justice. Prerequisites: RHT & (AHF & HSF) or AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2073 - MIDDLE EASTERN LITERATURE

MIDDLE EASTERN LITERATURE

LVA2073 Middle Eastern Literature 4 credit intermediate liberal arts This course explores the most provocative literary movements of the contemporary Middle East, including authors from the Iranian, Arab, Turkish, Armenian, and North African areas of the region. From the experimental novels of Naguib Mahfouz and Orhan Pamuk to the prison poetry of Ahmad Shamlu, from such legendary voices of exile as Adonis and Mahmoud Darwish to the dark sensual narratives of Joyce Mansour and Forugh Farrokhzad, we will cover a range of creative experiments with romanticism, mysticism, surrealism, existentialism, and post-modernism. As such, this will also allow us to unravel the many intricate concepts (those of desire, violence, time, space, power, revolution, and catastrophe) that form the Middle Eastern cultural imagination. Prerequisites: RHT & AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2074 - LITERATURE OF WITNESS

LITERATURE OF WITNESS

LVA 2074 Literature of Witness 3 credit intermediate liberal arts The film Ararat, by Atom Egoyan, contains testimony from a woman who has witnessed a massacre of young brides. She asks, Now that I have seen this event, how shall I dig out these eyes of mine? This woman occupies the most direct positionthe eyewitnessin relation to an extreme event; however, the question of witnessing also extends to all of us who encounter images and stories of atrocities in our everyday lives. We will trace the concept of witnessing in philosophical, legal, and human rights contexts before turning to novels and other literature of witness by international writers such as Pat Barker, Nadine Gordimer, Gunter Grass, Primo Levi, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Rigoberta Menchu, Toni Morrison, and Virginia Woolf in order to investigate the following questions: What kinds of events generate or require witnesses, and how does witnessing differ from simply seeing? What effects does the event have upon the witness, and vice versa? What does it mean for literature to act as a kind of witness? How can literature ethically represent or witness extreme events? What responsibilities do we have to serve as witnesses to extreme global events, and what do we do with the energy created by our witnessing of such events? Prerequisites: RHT and AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2075 - DESIGN FOR LIVING

DESIGN FOR LIVING

LVA2475 Design for Living 4 credit intermediate liberal arts Explores how profoundly our lives are shaped by the designs of graphics we see, objects we use and buildings we move through every day. Students will gain increased understanding of the role good and bad design plays in affecting them and in shaping the world in which they live. Prerequisites: RHT I & II and AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2078 - MAD, BAD, REBELS AND ANTIHEROS

MAD, BAD, REBELS AND ANTIHEROS

LVA2078 Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know: Rebels and Anti-Heroes (Intermediate Liberal Arts) When Lady Caroline Lamb described her former lover, the poet Lord Byron, as "mad, bad, and dangerous to know," she vividly captured a widespread fascination with figures who reject society's norms. Simultaneously alluring and threatening, rebels and anti-heroes unsettle the outer limit of acceptable behavior through their transgressions. This course will examine how rebels and anti-heroes shape a society's identity while living at - or beyond - its margins. We will also pay particular attention to questions of gender when considering these figures' own identities. We will read novels,plays, poetry, and cultural critique in order to trace the development of rebels and anti-heroes in western literature, as well as to understand them in their specific cultural and historical contexts. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2079 - THEORIES OF LOVE

THEORIES OF LOVE

LVA2079: Theories of Love 4 Intermediate Liberal Arts What is love? Where does it come from, what does it ask of us, and how does it alter our minds, bodies, values, and relations? Are sex, friendship, and marriage necessary for love, or do they inhibit loves fullest expression? In this course, we will examine how influential writers have conceived and contested loves meanings across a range of cultural contexts. Focusing primarily on erotic love (ers), we will consider how such meanings relate to notions of art, beauty, conjugality, legality, pleasure, sexuality, spirituality, and transgression, both in their original era and our own. Particular attention will be paid to differences of race, class, age, gender, and authority as incitements to, and/or impediments of, relations of love and eroticism. Prerequisites: RHT I000 and RHT I00I and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2080 - THE LITERATURE OF GUILT

THE LITERATURE OF GUILT

LVA2080: The Literature of Guilt: Im Sorry For Apologizing so Often 4 Intermediate Liberal Arts credit This course will examine guilt and how it affects us, both personally and societally. Through both literary and cultural texts, we will study guilt in a number of settings including familial guilt, generational guilt, survival guilt, and societal guilt. Students will be challenged to look at guilt in both its helpful and harmful forms, investigating why we feel the emotion and the effects it can have on us. We will read works by Dante Alighieri, Joseph Conrad, J.M. Coetzee, and Jane Smiley, among others. We will also watch Beloved and We Need To Talk About Kevin as well as the first season of Rectify. Prerequisites: RHT I and RHT II and AHS

4.00 credits