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Arts and Humanities Course Listing

LVA2013 - GLOBAL CINEMA

GLOBAL CINEMA

LVA2013 Global Cinema (4 credit Intermediate Liberal Arts) Global Cinema provides an overview of the history and aesthetics of films from Europe, Asia, Africa and South America. Students will analyze films as cultural artifacts and will consider the interrelationship among various national film movements and aesthetic approaches. Weekly film viewings will be complemented by readings in the history and practice of several national cinemas and of post-colonial, transnational cinemas. Films are in their original language with English subtitles. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000 This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2014 - MONEY AND LITERATURE

MONEY AND LITERATURE

LVA2014: Money and Literature 4 intermediate liberal arts This course looks at money and economic thinking in literature. We will examine works from a wide range of periods and genres, with a strong grounding in fiction and drama from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Aesthetic genres such as naturalism, modernism, post-modernism, and expressionism will be considered in terms of how they inform and are informed by thinking about money. There will also be contextual/theoretical readings from Marx, Benjamin, Simmel, Freud, Lacan, and others. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2015 - TRUTHFUL FICTIONS:BIOGRAPH NOVEL,MEMOIR

TRUTHFUL FICTIONS:BIOGRAPH NOVEL,MEMOIR

LVA2015: Truthful Fictions: Biographical Novel, Memoir & Biopic 4 Intermediate liberal arts credits What do works as disparate as Lin-Manuel Mirandas Hamilton, Spike Lees Black KkKlansman, Colum McCanns novel Transatlantic, Craig Gillespies I, Tonya and Tara Westovers memoir, Educated have in common? The past two decades have produced a remarkable surge in biographical fictions (what Alaine Buisine coined biofictions in 1991). Similarly, as three-time memoirist Mary Karr argues, memoir is in its heyday, with a massive increase in readership in the past twenty years or so. And the popularity of biopics, defined by George Custen as films minimally composed of a life or portion of a life of a real person have become a tidal wave that threatens to spill over into tsunami. What explains why true life stories have become the go-to dinner for fiction writers? In this course, we will explore how memory and forgetting, experience and perception, fact and invention, public and private history, personal relationships, social and political forces intersect in these popular literary and cinematic forms. We will examine the myriad ways authors and directors construct an auto/biographical self, how these may differ from the selves of lived experience, and what this suggests about how we navigate a world in which truth is often questioned and fiction may achieve an honesty that more purportedly truthful narratives fail to convey. Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2016 - VIOLENCE:THEORIES OF CRUELTY,EVIL INHUMA

VIOLENCE:THEORIES OF CRUELTY,EVIL INHUMA

LVA2016 Violence: Theories of Cruelty, Evil, and the Inhuman 4 credit intermediate liberal arts This course will investigate the idea of violence across an extensive spectrum of authors, texts, films, and literary-philosophical perspectives from the East and the West. We seek not merely to engage in a conventional critique but to exceed the boundaries of our embedded understanding by also contemplating this concept's fascinating potential as a form of literary imagination and intellectual expression. Topics will therefore include cruelty, vulnerability, power, betrayal, destruction, vengeance, anger, terror, defacement, pain, disaster, and inhumanity. From the poetics of torture to the damaged writings of war, from theoretical works on catastrophe to cinematic and artistic pieces on the nature of evil, the intent is to explore the many narratives that have emerged across the global horizon in the face of an often violent experience of the modern world. Prerequisites: AHS Foundation and RHT I & II

4.00 credits

LVA2020 - SONS AND DAUGHTERS IN FICTION MEM

SONS AND DAUGHTERS IN FICTION MEM

LVA2020 Sons and Daughters in Fiction and Memoir 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) In this literature course we will explore relations between parents and children as represented in fiction (including plays) and memoirs from a variety of cultures and eras. We will assume that in successful childhood development, a child moves in a complex process from attachment and identification with parental figures, through separation, to autonomy. Because of particular parents or other circumstances, however, the developmental process can be thwarted. We will examine individuals emerging from harmful childhood relational patterns who are struggling to remake themselves in the context of more constructive relations, or through the act of writing itself. This course will develop your confidence to be able to read, analyze, and write about literature, and to explore its relevance to your own lives. Readings will likely include Jamaica Kincaid, Annie John or My Brother; Franz Kafka, The Sons; Kathryn Harrison, The Kiss: A Memoir; Shakespeare, Hamlet; and Emily Bront, Wuthering Heights; selected short stories. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2022 - THE SPECULATIVE GENRES

THE SPECULATIVE GENRES

LVA2022 The Speculative Genres: Horror, Sci-Fi and Fantasy Literature and Film 4 credit intermediate liberal arts The modern speculative genres Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror engage audiences in difficult ethical and philosophical discussions. We will look at a great many themes in speculative storytelling, paying special attention to eugenics, representations of the human body, personhood and consciousness, and what it means to be a monster. We will explore texts as widely diverse as Marquezs The Autumn of the Patriarch, Katherine Dunns Geek Love, The Avengers and Bethesda Softworks Fallout franchise. Along the way, well talk about women in gamer culture, the acceptance and rejection of diversity in comics (and Marvels innovative remarketing strategy), Godzillas role as a tree-hugging environmentalist, and the ways that speculative fiction has fueled innovation and social change since the Industrial Revolution. Prerequisites: AHS and RHT

4.00 credits

LVA2029 - LITERATURES OF EMPIRE AND BEYOND

LITERATURES OF EMPIRE AND BEYOND

LVA2029: Literatures of Empire and Beyond (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Empires have been built and toppled all over the world since the beginning of recorded history, and literature has served both in the building and in the toppling. This course begins by examining 19th century imperialism with a focus on European colonization of territories in Africa and South Asia; moves through the nationalist movements that arguably brought political but not economic independence or prosperity to these places; and concludes by examining the shape of the global landscape today with its remote control empires that work through markets and information channels rather than territory and raw resources. We will explore these great geopolitical shifts by studying literature and film from European, African, and South Asian perspectives that can reveal the many perspectives on the impacts of cultural, political, and economic contact through imperialism. Prerequisites: RHT1000, RHT1001 and AHS1000

4.00 credits

LVA2030 - PLACE AND LANDSCAPE IN LITERATURE

PLACE AND LANDSCAPE IN LITERATURE

LVA2030 Reading Place and Landscape in American Literature 4 credit (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course investigates the ways American writers use place and landscape in their art. Reading fiction, essays, and poetry beginning in the 19th century and moving to contemporary works, we will explore the nature of place and landscape as physical, social, and intellectual and consider what it suggests about American culture and ideas. We will also look at several theoretical texts by cultural geographers, ecologists, and scholars of landscape architecture and regional planning. Ultimately, we will consider how place and landscape, both real and imagined, influence selected American writers' use of theme, imagery, character, and style, and reflect as well on how these concerns influence our own lives as readers, writers, thinkers, and dreamers. Reading Place and Landscape in American Literature is an intermediate level course and part of the Literary and Visual Arts category of the Liberal Arts Curriculum. Courses in this category focus on frameworks for understanding and appreciating the practice of representation, the creative process, and diverse modes of aesthetic expression. They also consider individual, historical, cultural, and formal factors in artistic creation and make manifest the multiple vantage points from which art can be interpreted. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Fall or Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2031 - BUSINESS AND AMERICAN DRAMA

BUSINESS AND AMERICAN DRAMA

LVA2031 Top Performers: Business in American Drama 4 credits (Intermediate Liberal Arts) Ever since Willy Loman walked on stage with his sample cases in Arthur Miller's 1949 masterpiece Death of a Salesman, it has been thought axiomatic that American playwrights have painted a bleak portrait of sales professionals in particular and businesspeople generally. But a close look at American dramatic treatments of business shows something more complicated. Over the past century American playwrights have located in the world of business and the world of drama a shared preoccupation with the sometimes tricky distinctions between word and act, authenticity and performance, the "real" and the symbolic. This course will look at a selection of American plays from the early twentieth century to the present, focusing on those plays' treatment of business and economic life. In addition to close scrutiny of dramatic texts and theatrical performances, we will also explore the role of performance in business. In other words, we'll look at both business in American drama and drama in American business. Your performance will be assessed through two papers, a mid-term and a final exam. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2032 - FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN ART

FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN ART

LVA2432 Foundations of Western Art (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course is designed to introduce students to painting, architecture, and sculpture from the Renaissance to the early 20th century and to give students an understanding of the general principles governing the visual arts. Topics such as the role of the artist, the functions of art in society, and the nature of visual language, among others, will be discussed as major artists and their works are presented in this survey of Western art. Class lectures and discussions are based on the presentation of slides. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2036 - CONTEMP WORLD LIT:WRITING OF THE UNREAL

CONTEMP WORLD LIT:WRITING OF THE UNREAL

LVA2036 Contemporary World Literature: Writing of the Unreal 4 credit intermediate liberal arts This course examines contemporary world literature through the specific prism of "the unreal." Writers from Latin America, the Caribbean, East Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East will be examined in their rich experiments with surrealism, anti-realism, hyper-realism, and irrealism. Moreover, this course will explore the enigmatic conceptual territories of the dream, the nightmare, the fantasy, the illusion, the hallucination, the mirage, the vision, and the simulation as breakaway zones of the global literary imagination. To achieve this task, we will evaluate authors as diverse as Haruki Murakami, Hassan Blasim, Clarice Lispector, Jose Saramago, Naguib Mahfouz, Kobo Abe, Juan Rulfo, and Reinaldo Arenas, interrogating their different approaches to the creation of phantasmtic, ethereal, and unknown spaces. Prerequisites: RHT II and AHS

4.00 credits

LVA2039 - CURIOSITY IN LITERATURE

CURIOSITY IN LITERATURE

LVA2039 Curiosity in Literature (Intermediate Liberal Art) Curiosity contains within it a contradiction; it is our drive to know battling against our fear of the unknown, and it has played a major role in literature for a very long time. In this course, we will read texts that span several continents and centuries as we study curiosity and ask ourselves myriad questions. Why did the definition of curiosity change from negative to positive in the 14th century? Is curiosity hubristic tinkering or social responsibility? How is curiosity valued? Is the valuation of curiosity dependent on what is being sought? Is curiosity linked to gender? Who is rewarded for possessing it? Who is punished? If curiosity killed the cat, why? We will study Greek Myths and Fairy Tales as well as the following authors: John Milton, Christopher Marlowe, Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Sigmund Freud, Agatha Christie, Anne Sexton, and Patricia Highsmith. We will also view Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2045 - MODERNISM AND THE MAKING OF THE NEW

MODERNISM AND THE MAKING OF THE NEW

LVA2045 Modernism and the Making of the New (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The British novelist Virginia Woolf declared that human nature underwent a fundamental change "on or about December 1910." The first few decades of the twentieth century are characterized by a fervent desire to break with the past and to reject traditions that seemed outmoded and too genteel to suit an era of psychological and technological breakthroughs and violence on a grand scale. This class will look at works that reflect ideas of experimentation, in both form and content, and that engaged new understandings of time, space, and human subjectivity. We will read writers such as Virginia Woolf, Joseph Conrad, James Joyce, T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, E.M. Forster, Djuna Barnes, and Katherine Mansfield, as well as the theories of Sigmund Freud and Albert Einstein (this is a tentative list). Be prepared; there is a lot of reading. These are difficult and challenging texts that do not rely on straightforward plot and narrative; they require careful analysis and critical engagement. Prerequisites: RHT and Foundation H&S and A&H This course may be offered Spring or Fall semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2049 - PILGRIMS AND PILGRIMAGE IN LIT

PILGRIMS AND PILGRIMAGE IN LIT

LVA2049 Seeking Enrichment: Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Literature (Intermediate Liberal Arts) The novelist Joyce Carol Oates has said, "To be an American is to be a kind of pilgrim ... a seeker after truth. The pilgrim is our deepest and purest self." In this course we'll explore the character of the pilgrim in selected fiction, essays, and poems, using questions such as: What inspires someone to take and retake pilgrimages: long, often difficult journeys far from home? What friendships and other communities form along the way and why? What besides self-enrichment do pilgrims hope to find, or possibly lose? Through close reading, discussion, and written analyses, we'll study how writers use setting, plot, and theme to consider these questions. There will also be one field trip, which will serve as a local pilgrimage. Course texts may include contemporary works by Kurt Vonnegut, Ursula Le Guin, and Curtis Sittenfeld, as well as selections from Dante, Petrarch, Chaucer,Basho, and Thoreau. Prerequisites: RHT and AHS This course may be offered Spring semester.

4.00 credits

LVA2061 - TALES OF THE CITY

TALES OF THE CITY

LVA2061 Tales of the City: Exploring Urban Literature (Intermediate Liberal Arts) This course will focus on the changing and diverse portrayals of cities and urban life in western literature from the earliest days of industrialization to the present. Inspired by Plato's observation, "this City is what it is because our citizens are what they are," we will explore the mutually-constructed relationship between a city and its citizens, asking such questions as: What does it mean to be an urban dweller? How does a city shape its residents' identity, and how do its residents influence a city's development? What are the delights and dangers of urban life? Where does one's sense of community/neighborhood overlap with - and diverge from - living in a particular city? We will read novels, short stories, poems, and essays, focusing primarily on London, but also likely including Dublin and New York City. To what extent can the concerns of a community within a city diverge from the concerns of the city as a whole? Prerequisites: RHT & Foundation A&H and H&S This course may be offered Fall semester.

4.00 credits