ARTS AND HUMANITIES DIVISION FACULTY PROFILES

Louissa Abdelghany

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Louissa Abdelghany received a Licence de Litérature Comparée in Arabic and French Literature from The Lebanese University in Lebanon and a Masters and Ph.D. in French Literature from Boston College. Louissa specialized in 19th-Century French Literature, more specifically in Balzac and his Comédie Humaine. Her thesis focused on the relationship between some of Balzac’s novels and the famous oriental works, The Arabian Nights.

She recently completed a manuscript entitled: Balzac comme “l’auteur des Milles et une nuits de l’Occident”, which is currently under review.

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Kimiko Ise Abramoff

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Kimiko Abramoff received a Master’s degree in English Literature from Assumption College in Massachusetts as well as a Master’s degree in Teaching English as a Second Language from St. Michael’s College in Vermont. She has been teaching Japanese language and Culture at Babson College for several decades. Abramoff recently completed a Japanese audio language program, Simon & Schuster’s Pimsleur Japanese 5, as a course writer.

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Meghan Allen

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Meghan Allen teaches courses in Elementary and Intermediate Spanish at Babson. She has previously taught courses at M.I.T. and Boston College. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Latin American literature, and her research interests include 20th century Latin American literature, postcolonial theory, and photography-embedded fiction.

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Ellen Argyros

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Dr. Argyros is an eclectic generalist who teaches in the Rhetoric Program at Babson College. Her research interests include multicultural literature, literature about jazz, modernist literature, fantasy literature, maternal subjectivity, and Victorian literature. She has written two unpulished novels in recent years, Song in the Key of Andromache and Malicious Incorporated.She has also published a book of poetry, Feta in Brine (Publish America, 2008) and is working on a second collection, Approved Activities for Mothers of Teenage Sons. She enjoys reading aloud from her work in the Faculty Waterline Series at Babson.

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Samantha Bankston

  • Senior Lecturer

Samantha Bankston is a visiting assistant professor of philosophy at Babson College. She specializes in 19th and 20th century continental philosophy, notably the ontology of Gilles Deleuze. Samantha is the author of Deleuze and Becoming (Bloomsbury, 2017), and she is currently completing a book manuscript entitled Deleuze and iek (Palgrave Macmillan). She translated Anne Sauvagnargues' book, Deleuze and Art (Bloomsbury/Continuum, 2013, 2017), as well as the work of other renowned philosophers, such as Gilles Deleuze, Frédéric Gros, and Salvo Vaccaro for the University of Minnesota Press, the University of Chicago Press, Lexington Books, among others. Her philosophical writings can be found in a variety of anthologies, including Simone de Beauvoir--A Humanist Thinker (Brill, 2015), Deleuze and the Passions (Punctum Books, 2016), as well as at the International Journal for iek Studies (2016).

Dr. Bankston is a part of the international translation team, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), under the direction of Purdue University Professor Daniel W. Smith, which makes available online previously unpublished, audio-recorded lectures from Gilles Deleuze’s University of Paris-8 seminars on the thought of Michel Foucault

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Stephen Bauer

  • Senior Lecturer

Stephen Bauer teaches Rhetoric and Arts and Humanities Foundation courses, an intermediate literature class on "The Short Story," and an advanced liberal arts elective in "Writing Creative Nonfiction." He has served as the Assistant Director of Business Communication in Babson's MBA Programs and the Director of the Undergraduate Rhetoric Program. Professor Bauer is a novelist, essayist, and short story writer; his work has appeared in American Fiction, Sewanee Review, and elsewhere, and has been anthologized in Best of Prairie Schooner: Personal Essays. His recent essay -- "Seasons of Violence, Seasons of Grace" -- was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

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Miranda Chen-Cristoforo

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Miranda Chen-Cristoforo teaches Chinese language courses at Babson College. Her research focuses on developing proficiency-based materials for introductory Chinese and using web-based and distance learning technologies to enhance Chinese language pedagogy. She has been teaching in the field of Chinese language and culture for over 20 years at various schools including MIT, Harvard University, Wellesley University, Tufts University, the Middlebury College Language School, Washington and Lee University, and Tunghai University. She has published two books, Close the Deal: Advanced Chinese for Creative and Productive Business and Taiwan Today: An Intermediate Reader. She was awarded the Joseph R. Levenson Memorial Teaching Award by the Harvard-Radcliffe Undergraduate Council and the Harvard University Certificate for Distinction in Teaching.

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Jordan Clapper

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Jordan Clapper

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Jon Dietrick

  • Associate Professor

Professor Dietrick teaches intermediate and advanced literature courses such as Business and American Drama, Modern Drama, and The London Stage. Professor Dietrick’s research deals mainly with literary representations of business and economic life. He is the author of the book Bad Pennies and Dead Presidents: Money in Modern American Drama. Additionally his work has appeared in journals such as American Drama, Twentieth-Century Literature, and the Journal of International Women’s Studies.

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Lorianne DiSabato

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Dr. DiSabato has taught writing and literature at various New England colleges, including Boston College, Northeastern University, Saint Anselm College, Keene State College, and Framingham State University. Before becoming a college instructor, Dr. DiSabato honed her teaching skills as an interpretive naturalist, leading nature walks and staffing nature centers in Ohio and Massachusetts.

Dr. DiSabato publishes a weblog, Hoarded Ordinaries, which showcases her nonfiction essays and digital photography. In addition to teaching at Babson College, she is a Senior Dharma Teacher in the Kwan Um School of Zen. Dr. DiSabato lives in Newton, Massachusetts with a husband, two dogs, and a herd of cats.

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Kellie Donovan-Condron

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Dr. Donovan-Condron teaches intermediate literature, rhetoric, and foundation courses in Arts and Humanities. Her research interests are an interdisciplinary mix of literature, history, and material culture. Areas of particular interest include urban identity in the early nineteenth century, the gothic novel, women's writing, consumerism and consumption in literature, Southern Gothic, and fairy tales. In the summer of 2013, she was selected to be a summer scholar in the National Endowment for the Humanities seminar "Reassessing Romanticism." She is currently part of a team that is producing a digital archive of nineteenth-century writer Mary Russell Mitford's works and correspondence.

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Katherine Faigen

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Katherine Faigen is a Boston area writer and educator who currently, teaches composition and rhetoric courses at Emerson and Babson colleges. In the spring, Katherine coaches high school rowing and spends her summer teaching at Phillips Academy in Andover. She earned her MFA from Emerson College and her BA from Bryn Mawr College. Before moving to Boston, Katherine taught high school English and writing on Long Island.

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Katrin Fischer

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Dr. Fischer teaches writing courses at all levels, Arts and Humanities foundation courses, and intermediate courses in American literature and culture.

Before joining Babson in 2011, she taught at the universities of Chemnitz and Dresden in Germany and at Bentley University; she worked as Director of Marketing for the US subsidiary of a German company, and as trainer and workshop facilitator for a professional development company in Germany. She holds a PhD from the University of Paderborn, Germany, an MBA from Babson College, and the equivalent of an MA from Chemnitz University of Technology, Germany.

Dr. Fischer is the author or editor of three published books: a study of the representation of Native Americans in contemporary crime fiction, a bilingual edition of Shakespeare quotations in English and German, and an edition of a young adult novel annotated for EFL/ESL learners. She has published scholarly articles on diverse topics, from crime and detective fiction to the pedagogy of teaching to marketing. Most recently, she co-authored a business case on sustainable agriculture. Her current research interests focus on the intersection between the liberal arts and business, with an emphasis on sustainability. Currently, she is working on a scholarly article conceptualizing ecological entrepreneurship and on a business case illustrating challenges in ethical decision-making.

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Fritz Fleischmann

  • Professor
  • William R. Dill Governance Professor

Educated in Germany, England and the United States, Fritz Fleischmann received his doctorate summa cum laude from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg in 1983, the year he joined the Babson faculty. At Babson, he has served as founding chair of the undergraduate honors program, chair of the Arts and Humanities Division, associate director of the Glavin Center for Global Entrepreneurial Leadership, and Dean of Faculty. He was awarded the Tomasso Term Chair in 1991 and the William R. Dill Governance Chair in 1997.

Mr. Fleischmann is the author, editor, or co-editor of five books, and the author of numerous essays and articles on American literature and culture, with a special interest in feminism and the history of gender. He was the founding chair of the editorial board for the NEH-supported Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive and Scholarly Edition, of which the first print volume appeared in 2013, and he is currently working on a biography of John Neal (1793-1876), as well as a co-edited collection of Neal’s short fiction.

Another area of interest is the history and culture of entrepreneurship, on which he has written several papers. He serves on the board of the Faltin Foundation for Entrepreneurship in Berlin, Germany and has edited the English rendition of Günter Faltin’s bestselling Kopf schlägt Kapital (Brains versus Capital: Entrepreneurship for Everyone. 2013)

Fritz Fleischmann teaches a range of undergraduate courses in literary and cultural studies, as well as writing, most recently focusing on eco-criticism and environmental issues.

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Kristi Girdharry

  • Lecturer

Kristi Girdharry is the Director of the Writing Center and a lecturer in the Arts and Humanities division where she teaches foundational writing courses and the practicum on peer consulting and writing. Previously, she was an Assistant Professor of English at Johnson & Wales University where, in addition to writing, she also taught courses on social media, communication skills, and advanced research methods. She holds a PhD in English with a focus in Rhetoric and Composition from Northeastern University.

Much of her scholarly and pedagogical interests come from work with community sites and partners. Stemming from her role in the creation of an oral history project and digital archive built to capture the ephemera following the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings, her dissertation—“Composing Digital Community Spaces: Design and Literacy Practices in/of the Archive”—offered a case study of a crowdsourced archive meant to simultaneously memorialize and historicize the events. She has published and given talks on aspects of this work ranging from understanding who participates in these types of story-sharing spaces to examining the linguistic practices of such story sharers, which show interesting markers of race, class, and inclusion/exclusion. With attention to the concept of “archival silencing,” she is currently working on a new oral history project that aims to safely uplift the voices of people who feel unheard in the media and to offer an historical record of communities’ responses to violence in and around Boston.

In addition to also working on scholarship related to teaching and tutoring, she is a co-editor for the Best of the Journals in Rhetoric and Composition Series, which offers a current snapshot of the exigent themes, trends, and ideas within Writing Studies and also contextualizes each piece with activities and discussion questions to help aid in professional development conversations for instructors who may not have the means or time to attend the conferences and keep up with all recent scholarship. Relatedly, she is on the board of the Boston Rhetoric and Writing Network (BRAWN), which continues to offer free professional development opportunities for writing instructors.

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Michelle Graham

  • Lecturer

Michelle Graham teaches in the Rhetoric Program, in the Division of Arts and Humanities, with a focus on Human/Nature (dis)connections. In addition to Rhetoric, she teaches AHS Foundation, Narratives of Sustainability, and American Transcendentalism. Prior to arriving at Babson, she taught first-year writing at Tufts University, as well as first-year writing, survey of American Literature, and U.S. Multicultural Literatures at Emerson College.

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Sandra Graham

  • Associate Professor

(on sabbatical January 2019–January 2020)

Professor Graham is an ethnomusicologist who teaches the AHS foundation ("Memory and Forgetting"), art music appreciation, African American music, global pop, and music traditions from around the world. She served as President of the Society for American Music 2017–2019 and is now Past President (2019–20). Before joining the Babson faculty in 2011, she founded the graduate program in ethnomusicology at the University of California, Davis, and had visiting appointments at Davidson College, the University of Ljubljana (Slovenia), the Music Academy of the University of Zagreb (Croatia), and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Her book Spirituals and the Birth of a Black Entertainment Industry was published by University of Illinois Press in March 2018. Her articles on spirituals and blackface minstrelsy have been published in journals, books, the Grove Dictionary of American Music (2nd ed.), and The Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology (revised 2013). With vocalist Chad Runyon she produced and recorded twelve songs by black entertainer Sam Lucas.

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John Hodge

  • Lecturer

Current Project: Bent Victorians: Obsession in Victorian Literature and Culture, which claims that obsessive narrative structures within Victorian literature result from the tension between realism's representational goals and its narrative objectives.

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Danielle Krcmar

  • Adjunct Lecturer
  • Associate Director, Visual Arts

Danielle Krcmar is a Sculptor and Curator. Currently Associate Director of the Visual Arts at Babson College, She has taught at Brandeis University, Clark University, and The Museum School in Boston. She has received grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the St Botolph Foundation, The Blanche Colman Foundation, and The Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation. She has created outdoor installations for the Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust, Highfield Hall, Forest Hills Cemetery, and the Fort Point Channel Neighborhood in Boston. Her work has been shown in the Fuller Art Museum, the Duxbury Art Complex Museum, Stonehill College, Clark University, and other galleries in New England and New York. Her work was most recently featured in Ocean State Review and Quilting with a Modern Slant in addition to having be been reviewed in Sculpture Magazine, The Boston Globe, The Boston Herald, ArtScope and The Boston Phoenix among others.

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Melissa Leonard

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Dr. Leonard teaches Rhetoric 1 and 2, Arts and Humanities Foundation courses, and, at the Intermediate level, Curiosity in Literature and Lively, Literary Massachusetts. She has written on Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping and extensively on the role of curiosity in Gothic novels. Professor Leonard is currently publishing her first children’s book on diversity in families (forthcoming Winter 2015-Spring 2016). She is also working on her book of creative non-fiction tentatively titled From the Kernel to the Cob, from which she has read selections at Babson’s Waterline Series and at the Fine Arts Works Center in Provincetown, MA. Professor Leonard is the editor of the poetry collection Love Me Like That by Massachusetts poet Jeanette Winthrop (forthcoming Fall 2015).

Prior to coming to Babson, Dr. Leonard taught writing and literature at Brooklyn College and Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York. At Brooklyn College, she was also the administrator of the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Studies as well as the Service Learning program.

Professor Leonard received a Ph.D. and an M.A. in English and American Literature from New York University, and a B.A. in Sociology and a Certificate in Women’s Studies from Douglass College, Rutgers University.

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Julie Levinson

  • Professor

Julie Levinson is Professor of Film and Chair of the Arts and Humanities division. She teaches courses in film and cultural history. Previously, she taught at M.I.T., Tufts University/School of the Museum of Fine Arts and the Rencontres Cinématographiques Franco-Américaines in Avignon, France. She holds a PhD. in Film and Literature and an M.S. in Film from Boston University, as well as a B.A. in Theatre Arts and English from Cornell University.

In addition to her academic appointments, Levinson was the Curator of Film at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Director of Programming at the Boston Film/Video Foundation, and Curator/Producer of Mixed Signals cable television series for the New England Foundation for the Arts. She has curated film series for several other organizations including the Flaherty Film Seminar, the Celebration of Black Cinema, and the Davis Museum and Cultural Center at Wellesley College. She has been a panelist for, among others, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute at Harvard University, and the New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Vermont Councils on the Arts. She frequently serves as a film festival judge and an editorial consultant on documentary films.

Levinson is the author of The American Success Myth on Film (Palgrave MacMillan), editor of Alexander Payne: Interviews (University Press of Mississippi) and co-editor of Acting in the Behind the Silver Screen film history series (Rutgers University Press). Her published work in journals and edited collections has focused on a wide range of topics including genre and gender, documentary film, narrative theory, and metafiction.

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Stephen McElroy

  • Assistant Professor

Stephen J. McElroy is Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Composition and Director of First-Year Writing. He specializes in composition theory and pedagogy, multimodal production, digital composing, and assemblage theory. His work has appeared in Computers and Composition, Kairos, and Enculturation, among other venues. His 2017 collection, Assembling Composition, co-edited with Kathleen Blake Yancey and published in the Studies in Writing and Rhetoric series by NCTE, examines the relationship between assemblage and composing in theory, in the classroom, and in the world. For his 2014 Kairos article, he and his coauthors Michael Neal and Katherine Bridgman received the Computers and Composition Michelle Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award.

Before joining Babson, Stephen directed the Reading-Writing Center and Digital Studio at Florida State University, where he previously earned his PhD, and taught courses in FSU's Editing, Writing, and Media major and College Composition program. He also holds an M.A. in English from Belmont University and a B.S. in Computer Information Systems from the Gordon Ford College of Business at Western Kentucky University.

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Weston Miller

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Weston previously taught courses in Composition, Creative Writing, and Literature at Saint Anselm College, Colby-Sawyer College, the University of New England, Southern Maine Community College, and Chemeketa Community College. He has prior work experience as a corporate attorney and an advertising copywriter.

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Denny Moers

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Denny Moers is known for his highly imaginative, technically innovative monoprints created by controlling the action of light on the chemical-sensitized photographic paper during the print developing process, giving his black and white photographs an extraordinary range of tonalities. He has photographed subject matter as diverse as New England architecture, medieval wall frescoes and tomb reliefs, contemporary constructions sites and western landscapes and dwellings. His current work is Animal Laments: common animal masks.

Moers received his MFA from the Visual Studies Workshop. During the 1980’s he worked as Aaron Siskind’s first assistant and printer. He is currently on the faculty of Roger Williams University and Babson College. He received a RI Pell Award for Excellence in the Arts in 2003 and the RI Council on the Arts Fellowship in Photography four times. His photographic monoprints are included in over 30 public and private collections throughout the world including the the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Huston Museum of Art, the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, the San Francisco Museum of Contemporary Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, Israel Museum in Jerusalem, and the Museo Rufino Tamayo, Mexico City.

Recent publications include a new biographic film, Casting Deep Shade by David H Wells, a book of the same title in collaboration with CD Wright will be published by Copper Canyon Press in 2018, a featured chapter in the ‘Experimental Photography Workbook’ by Christiana Anderson published in 2012, and the portfolio Between Now & Then-A selection of book covers with a foreword by CD Wright published in 2006. His work has graced the covers of over 25 books and albums. Mr. Moers’ artwork is represented by the Robert Klein Gallery, Boston, Mass., Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago, IL, and Thomas Meyer Fine Art, San Francisco, CA.

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Jason Mohaghegh

  • Associate Professor

Jason Bahbak Mohaghegh teaches courses in comparative literature, Middle Eastern studies, world literature, and modern philosophy. He received a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies from Columbia University, with an interest in global intersections of the avant-garde, existentialism, postcolonialism, and postmodernism. Professor Mohaghegh's scholarly focus is upon tracking emergent currents of experimental thought in the Middle East and the West, with particular attention to exploring the concepts of chaos, violence, illusion, silence, sectarianism, and apocalyptic writing.

He has published eight books to date—The Chaotic Imagination: New Literature and Philosophy of the Middle East (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010), Inflictions: The Writing of Violence in the Middle East (Continuum, 2012), The Radical Unspoken: Silence in Middle Eastern and Western Thought (Routledge, 2013), Insurgent, Poet, Mystic, Sectarian: The Four Masks of an Eastern Postmodernism (SUNY, 2015); Born Upon the Dark Spear: Selected Poems of Ahmad Shamlu (translation; Contra Mundum, 2016); Elemental Disappearances (co-authored with Dejan Lukic; Punctum Books, 2016); Manifestos of World Thought (co-edited with Lucian Stone, Rowan & Littlefield, 2017); and Omnicide: Mania, Fatality, and the Future-In-Delirium (MIT Press, Urbanomic/Sequence Series, 2019). He is also the co-editor of a book series titled Suspensions: Contemporary Middle Eastern and Islamicate Thought (Bloomsbury), which is dedicated to showcasing cutting-edge movements in literature, philosophy, culture, and art across the region, and the co-director of the 5th Disappearance Lab.

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Phyllis Anina Moriarty

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Susan Nagelsen

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Until her retirement in June 2014, Susan Nagelsen was the director of the writing program at New England College in Henniker, NH. Unable to stay away from the classroom, she is now a professor at Curry College in Milton, MA and also teaches for Granite State College in Concord, NH. She is a senior consulting editor for BleakHouse Publishing, whose offices are in American University in Washington, DC. She also finds room in her busy schedule to serve as the associate editor and frequent contributor for the Journal of Prisoners on Prisons, a peer-reviewed criminal-justice journal published by the University of Ottawa.

Her book, Exiled Voices: Portals of Discovery, is a collection of writings by women and men in prisons across the country, gathered during her research and fieldwork and is used in writing curricula in a number of colleges and universities.

Susan has also published short fiction (Tacenda Literary Magazine, New Plains Review BleakHouse Review, IdeaGems) and poetry (The Poet's Touchstone). Her essay on higher education was published in Thought & Action, the journal of the National Education Association. Her two great passions in life are writing and education, each inextricably bound to the other.

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Camilla Jiyun Nam

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Camilla Jiyun Nam taught courses in Rhetoric & Composition, Literature, and Creative Writing at the University of Arizona, Yonsei University, and Boston University. She was director of the College English Tutoring Center at Yonsei University International Campus. Nam has prior work experience as a translator and education consultant.

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Sophia Niehaus

Sophia Wilson Niehaus is an Adjunct Lecturer in French at Babson College. She has taught at the French Cultural Center of Boston and in the French Department of New York University. She earned a Ph.D. in 20th century French literature from New York University, an M.A. in French literature from NYU in Paris, and a B.A. in English and French from Vassar College.

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Mary O'Donoghue

  • Professor

Mary O’Donoghue is a novelist, short story writer, poet and translator. She teaches writing fiction, rhetoric, and literature classes at Babson College. She is the author of the novel Before the House Burns (The Lilliput Press, 2010) and the poetry collections Among These Winters (Dedalus Press, 2007) and Tulle (Salmon Poetry, 2001). Her fiction has appeared in many European and US journals: Granta, Georgia Review, Kenyon Review, Irish Times, Sunday Times UK, Stinging Fly, Dublin Review, and elsewhere.

Mary O'Donoghue's translations of Irish-language poets Seán Ó Ríordáin and Colm Breathnach are published in Leabhar na hAthghabhála/ Poems of Repossession (Bloodaxe Books/ Clo Iar-Chonnacht, 2016). Her translations of Ó Ríordáin also appear in Selected Poems (Yale University Press, 2014). Her collaborative translations of the work of Irish-language poet Louis de Paor featured in the first major bilingual edition of his work, Ag Greadadh Bas sa Reilig/Clapping in the Cemetery (Cló Iar-Chonnachta, 2005), and in agus rud eile de/and another thing (Cló Iar-Chonnachta, 2010) and The Brindled Cat and the Nightingale’s Tongue (Bloodaxe, 2014).

Her writing awards include Hennessy/Sunday Tribune New Irish Writer; a Tyrone Guthrie/Virginia Center for Creative Arts fellowship; an artist grant from Vermont Studio Center. She has also been awarded two artist fellowships from Massachusetts Cultural Council, most recently in 2012. In 2013 her short story “The Sweet Forbearance in the Streets” won the Irish Times/ Legends of the Fall prize for fiction responding to Ireland’s economic crisis. In recognition of her body of work in poetry, fiction and translation, she received a Babson College Faculty Scholarship Award in 2008; for ongoing work she was named a Babson Research Scholar for 2015-2018. She is currently working on her next novel. She is Fiction Editor at the literary journal AGNI.

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Mary Pinard

  • Professor

Mary Pinard is Professor of English at Babson College. She earned a B.A. in English and Theatre from Saint Mary’s College (Notre Dame, IN), an M.A. in English from University of Chicago, and an M.F.A. in Poetry from Vermont College.

Professor Pinard's poems have appeared in a variety of literary journals—including The Iowa Review, Harvard Review, Prairie Schooner, and The Georgia Review—and she has been the recipient of several national awards for her poetry. Portal, her collection of poems, was published in 2014 by Salmon Press (Ireland). Her essays on poetics and poets, including Alice Oswald and Lorine Niedecker, have been published in critical anthologies and scholarly journals. More information about her poetry, public readings, and publications can be found at www.marypinard.com.

As a member of the Arts and Humanities Division, Professor Pinard teaches courses in foundation humanities, literature, and poetry. She has also served in a range of administrative positions at Babson, including as Director of the Undergraduate Rhetoric Program, Coordinator of the Creativity Stream in the MBA Program, Writing Center Director, and Chair of Arts and Humanities.

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Virginia Rademacher

  • Associate Professor
  • Director, Languages and Global Cultures

Virginia (Jenny) Rademacher is Associate Professor of Hispanic Literature and Culture, and Director of Languages & Global Cultures at Babson College. She received her PhD in Hispanic Literature from the University of Virginia, M.A. in International Affairs & Economics from Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), and A.B. from Harvard University.

She has published widely on genre, identity, and new narrative formats, including the contemporary surge in biographical fiction. Among others, her publications have appeared in in a/b:Auto/Biography Studies, American Book Review, Persona Studies, Economistas, Hispanic Issues, Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, Ciberletras, and Monographic Review. Her current book project relates approaches to uncertainty and risk in the fields of business and finance with literary strategies as seen through recent trends in Spanish narrative.

She teaches a variety of interdisciplinary and globally focused courses that often draw from her expertise in Hispanic literature, film, and cultural studies. Prior to coming to Babson, she taught at the University of Virginia, Randolph College, and Georgetown University. She received the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2015.

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Kerry Rourke

  • Senior Lecturer
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Brian Seitz

  • Professor

Dr. Seitz teaches Ethics and advanced level philosophy courses, including Social and Political Philosophy; Nature, Technology, and Values; Modern Philosophy; Existentialism; and Aesthetics. One of the faculty leaders of Babson’s BRIC Program, he also teaches Russia in Modernity: History, Politics & Culture, in St. Petersburg, Russia.

He is the author of Intersubjectivity and the Double: Troubled Matters (Palgrave), The Trace of Political Representation (SUNY Press), and co-author of The Iroquois and Athenians: A Political Ontology (Lexington Books/Rowman & Littlefield). He is also co-editor of Being in Transit: Thoughts on Travel, Place, and Culture (forthcoming), Living with Class: Philosophical Reflections on Identity and Material Culture (Palgrave Macmillan), Fashion Statements: On Style, Appearance, and Reality (Palgrave Macmillan), Eating Culture (SUNY Press), and Etiquette: Reflections on Contemporary Comportment (SUNY Press), as well as numerous articles in the areas of social and political philosophy, continental philosophy, and environmental philosophy.

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Stephen Spiess

  • Assistant Professor

Stephen Spiess is assistant professor of literature at Babson College. He specializes in early modern English literature and culture, with particular investments in Shakespeare and the interrelations of sex, language, embodiment, and knowledge in the English Renaissance. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in Shakespeare Survey, Renaissance Quarterly, The Review of English Studies, The Oxford Handbook of Shakespeare and Embodiment: Gender, Sexuality, and Race, and Blind Spots of Knowledge in Shakespeare and His World. He is currently completing a book, Shakespeare and the Making of English Whoredom, for Oxford University Press, and co-editing, with Marjorie Rubright, a keywords collection entitled Logomotives: Words that Changed the Premodern World, which will appear as part of the Early Modern Conversions series at Edinburgh University Press. His new book project, Renaissance Undoing, examines an early modern fascination with, and fear of, ‘becoming undone.’

Stephen completed his PhD in English Language & Literature at the University of Michigan (2013), where he also received the David & Linda Moscow Prize for Excellence in Teaching English Composition (2010). Before joining the Babson faculty in 2017, he taught at Stanford University.

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Elizabeth Swanson

  • Professor
  • Mandell Family Foundation Senior Term Chair

Professor Swanson teaches courses in African American literature and culture, international literatures, and human rights. Currently the Mandell Family Foundation Senior Term Chair in Literature and Human Rights, she previously held the Mandell Family Term Chair (2007-2012) and was voted Professor of the Year by the graduating classes of 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2019. Dr. Swanson has received the Faculty Scholarship Award, 2012; the Martin Luther King, Jr. Leadership Award, 2012; the Lewis Institute for Social Innovation Changemaker Award, 2012; the Nan Langowitz Women Who Make a Difference Award, 2007; the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2006; and the Faculty Innovators Among Us award, 2004.

Author of Beyond Terror: Gender, Narrative, Human Rights (Rutgers University Press, 2007), Dr. Swanson has published articles in journals and edited collections in the areas of multicultural and international literature and pedagogies, gender studies, and human rights. She edited a special issue of the transnational journal Peace Review devoted to the subject of literature, film, and human rights (Spring 2008), and she is co-editor, with Alexandra Schultheis Moore, State University of New York, Binghamton, of Theoretical Perspectives on Literature and Human Rights (Routledge 2011), Teaching Human Rights in Literary and Cultural Studies (Modern Language Association Press, 2015), and Witnessing Torture: Perspectives from Torture Survivors and Human Rights Workers (Palgrave, 2018).

Dr. Swanson has worked extensively on the issue of modern slavery and human trafficking, serving as Board Member and, currently, Co-Chair of the international NGO Historians Against Slavery, and as Board Chair for the NGO Made By Survivors (now Her Future Coalition) from 2008-2016. She has worked directly with survivors of both slavery and torture in India, Nepal, and the US. In July, 2018, Cambridge University Press published Slaveries Since Emancipation: The Past and the Challenge of Bondage in the New Millennium, which she co-edited with James Brewer Stewart. Dr, Swanson also served as a Commissioner for the Barnstable County Human Rights Commission from 2007-2009, and as Chair in 2010.

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Beth Wynstra

  • Assistant Professor

Beth Wynstra teaches courses in American Drama, Acting, Modernism, and Rhetoric. She holds a Ph.D. in Theater Studies from the University of California at Santa Barbara and a certificate in Directing from the Yale School of Drama. Beth is working on a book manuscript tentatively titled “I Only Act a Part You’ve Created”: Eugene O'Neill's Wife Characters, A Reconsideration, which investigates the agency, persuasive tactics, and status of wife characters in the plays of Eugene O’Neill. She has written extensively on the life and plays of Eugene O’Neill and serves on the board of the Eugene O’Neill International Society. Beth regularly directs plays and musicals at Babson and is the Founding Artistic Director of The Empty Space Theater. From 2013 until 2015 Beth served as the first Faculty Director of the Sorenson Center for the Arts.

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Janice Yellin

  • Professor

Dr. Yellin has taught at Louisiana State University, the University of Florida, Brandeis University, and Merrimack College. She has held the Martha Willcomb Lectureship in Egyptian Civilization at Harvard University. Her major interest is in Egyptology and Meroitic Studies. She is currently Director of the Royal Pyramids of Kush Project which is publishing the pyramids of the kings and queens of ancient Meroe (c350 BC - AD 350) which are located north of Khartoum. These decorated, royal tombs are the last pyramids built in Africa and are endangered by human activities and environmental changes. The project has been funded by grants from major foundations. She has published numerous articles on ancient Sudanese art and religion and recently completed her term as a member of the Board of the International Society for Nubian Studies.

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Elizabeth Young

  • Adjunct Lecturer

Elizabeth Young earned a B.A. in English from Boston College and an M.F.A. in Writing from Lesley University. Her novella, Dump & Chase, was published in 2012 as part of the North American Open Door series promoting adult literacy. She teaches Composition and Creative Writing at Emmanuel College and Lesley University.

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