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Entrepreneurship

The Course Catalog includes course descriptions of all courses offered by the Undergraduate School at Babson College. For descriptions of the courses offered in the current or upcoming semesters, please see the Course Listing.

EPS4510 - ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE

ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE

EPS4510 Entrepreneurial Finance (formerly EPS3511) (General Credit) How much money should I raise? Who should I raise it from and how? What do I do with the money once I have it? This course focuses on the various aspects of funding and managing entrepreneurial ventures through the various stages of business growth. The class will utilize videos, cases, simulation and experiential learning techniques to explain how to finance the entrepreneurial firm, investment analysis and decision making, and managing company finances through growth, crisis and harvesting. Frequent guests ranging from entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, banking and legal professionals will bring the entrepreneurial experience to life in this course which utilizes the flipped classroom methodology of teaching. Prerequisite: All SME Courses This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring

4.00 credits

EPS4515 - AFFORDABLE DESIGN AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

AFFORDABLE DESIGN AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

**Students must be Juniors or Seniors to take this course EPS4515 Affordable Design and Entrepreneurship General Credit 1.4 billion people live on less than $1.25 per day (The Millennium Development Goals Report, 2009). While the problems afflicting the poor are great, there is power in thinking small - how a simple, focused innovation can change an individual life, a personal choice or a system. Affordable Design and Entrepreneurship (ADE) is an international, experiential social entrepreneurship and design course where students work in partnership with communities in India, Ghana, Morocco and Alabama to co-create and test innovation concepts and sustainable business models. The focus is on income generation and meeting daily human needs through new product and service design and development but the scope considers the cultural appropriateness of design choices and their impact on social venture success. This includes how design can impact the desirability and viability of innovations in different problem-opportunity contexts, examined in the innovation phases of observation, conception, strategic planning and implementation. A joint offering by Babson and Olin College, the course integrates core elements of user-oriented collaborative design and engineering design with entrepreneurial opportunity shaping and venture strategy. Babson and Olin College students work collaboratively in cross-functional teams to exploit their respective expertise and strengths. Starting with ethnographic research, venture teams collaborate first-hand with local communities on focused issues to identify addressable problems and to evaluate and test potential innovation solutions. Mixing entrepreneurship and design pedagogies, the course takes a systems view considering how design choices in product/service design and business model design can enhance-or diminish-a social venture's impact. The course is run as a virtual firm where students work on distributed teams to develop social ventures by engaging with partner organizations, prioritizing programs, and setting and pursing goals while deploying modest amounts of seed capital. The course is time-intensive but rich and immersive. Students travel once per semester to partner sites to build relationships, learn about local culture, understand and map needs, identify stakeholders, perform experiments and tests, and collect information on local infrastructure and value chains. (a) Prerequisites: FME1000, Junior standing Students must be juniors or seniors to take the course.

4.00 credits

EPS4520 - SF2 SILICON TECHNOLOGY VENTURES

SF2 SILICON TECHNOLOGY VENTURES

EPS 4520 Silicon Valley Tech Ventures 4 General Credits This course focuses on the process of applying ET&A and using action and reflection to better understand how technological innovation impacts business and venture creation. Our primary goal will be to develop an understanding of the key components of successful technology-based entrepreneurship. In addition to focusing on the action steps for developing a venture, we will also examine the concepts of design thinking, funding, and entrepreneurial ecosystems. The course is based in San Francisco, the epicenter of technology companies. This context offers a unique opportunity to gain a more experiential understanding of technology-based entrepreneurship.

4.00 credits

EPS4521 - VENTURE GROWTH STRATEGIES

VENTURE GROWTH STRATEGIES

EPS 4521: VENTURE GROWTH STRATEGIES General Credit The course focuses on the opportunities and challenges involved in the management of growth in entrepreneurial settings, either in an individual company or as part of a larger corporation. Growth is the ultimate resource constrainer, stretching all systems in a company to the limit and often beyond. Consequently, this course will emphasize management "at the limit" of what students may have already learned in other functional courses. It will provide students with a series of frameworks, analytical skills and techniques, and decision-making tools that can be used in growing entrepreneurial businesses. The course relies on non-traditional, experiential learning methods in addition to the usual case-based method. While some classroom meetings will include case discussions involving growth-related issues, other classroom meetings will involve computer-based simulation exercises which are used by leading companies worldwide as an innovative training tool because of the rich experience it provides to participants. Guest speakers will provide further insight into the opportunities and challenges of growth. The course is particularly useful to students who have interests in one or more of the following areas: (1) growing their own entrepreneurial companies, (2) managing the growth of existing companies in an entrepreneurial fashion by emphasizing innovation and opportunity capture in a dynamic environment, and/or (3) helping companies manage their growth through consulting assignments. Prerequisite: No Prerequisites This course is typically offered in the following semester: Spring

4.00 credits

EPS4523 - ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE EPS

ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE EPS

**Students must be Juniors or Seniors to take this course EPS4523 Ennvironment and Sustainable Entrepreneurship 4 credit general credit In a global economy with increasing population and economic growth, environmental impacts and social justice are becoming increasingly important to todays business leaders. Environmental problems, resource shortages and social inequality will call into question our ability to continue to meet the needs of a growing population using our current solutions. While troubling, this future represents enormous opportunities for entrepreneurs who figure out how to meet those needs in new ways that take into account social and environmental issues This course examines two aspects of this issue. The first is to look at ways in which we can develop these new solutions by understanding and challenging our assumptions of how the industries and businesses need to be structured. The second is to examine what it means to create a sustainable business, regardless of the nature of the business. Students will leave the class with a better understanding of how to identify opportunities that address environmental issues and have a better understanding of how their decisions as an entrepreneur impact the environment and society, regardless of the type of venture they are pursuing. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing

4.00 credits

EPS4525 - LIVING THE SOCIAL EPS EXPERIENCE

LIVING THE SOCIAL EPS EXPERIENCE

EPS4525: Living the Social Entrepreneurship Experience (General Credit) EPS4525, EPS4530 (formerly EPS3530), EPS4531, EPS4532, EPS4533 and EPS4534 are equivalent courses. Students can only take one of these courses. Living the Social Entrepreneurial Experience is about solving "people and planet" problems while generating societal and economic value. Building on the foundation from EPS 3501, this course is action focused, where you will execute on a real opportunity in teams. Students put Entrepreneurial Thought and Action into practice by developing, taking and building on key action steps to advance their own social venture or on projects for existing social enterprises. Key elements of the process involve secondary research and engaging experts, stakeholders, analogous/complementary ventures, and investors/donors to enrich understanding of the social entrepreneurship landscape and test ideas. Course readings and cases will provide supplemental background. Core to the class experience is the question - how do you build and lead a social venture? Students will set milestones to move their venture forward, working with both with external mentors and peer advisors. The core is action based learning which will result in pivoting your venture based on information gained in experimenting and testing assumptions. The course has multiple deliverables related to key actions and decisions in marketing, finance, customer service and operations. Students are expected to work independently as well as interdependently with other social entrepreneurs in the course. Contact time for this course will be split between in-class sessions and out-of-class individual meetings with the instructor. Prerequisites: SME and EPS3501 This course is typically offered in the following semester: Fall

4.00 credits

EPS4527 - SOC EPS BY DESIGN

SOC EPS BY DESIGN

EPS4527 Social Entrepreneurship by Design (formerly EPS3527) General Credit This course is a call to action to students to grapple with challenges that have large potential to make social impact. Design Thinking methodology (user-oriented collaborative design) is used as well as key concepts and action methodologies in Entrepreneurship. Students will develop new products and/or services that contribute to the solution of a social problem the students and Professor of the class select. Solving social problems requires multiple perspectives. We will design products and/or services that yield both economic and social value for multiple stakeholder groups and explore the challenge to discover and identify who these various stakeholders are while focusing on integrating their perspectives/needs/wants into the design process. In Social Entrepreneurship by Design, students observe, build insights, and aim to uncover and design potential value for all key stakeholders. Addressing social problems requires collaboration, partnerships, alliances and even special funding. The chief aim of the course is to understand and apply a design process with far-reaching implications for social activists and social entrepreneurs. While the problems of the world are large, the course encourages students to focus on challenges they are passionate about, to give these problems definition and to build solutions that are well-defined. Because the course is experiential, students have the opportunity to engage multiple stakeholders to motivate their entrepreneurial approaches and solutions. Course is held in the Design Zone. Prerequisites: For Babson students: SME and EPS3501, EPS3503, or EPS4520 (either can be taken prior to or with EPS4527) For Wellesley or Olin students: SUS1201

4.00 credits

EPS4530 - LIVING THE EPS EXPERIENCE (GENERAL FOCUS

LIVING THE EPS EXPERIENCE (GENERAL FOCUS

EPS4530: Living the Entrepreneurial Experience General Credit EPS4530 (formerly EPS3530), EPS4525, EPS4531, EPS4532, EPS4533 and EPS4534 are equivalent courses. Students can only take one of these courses. Living the Entrepreneurial Experience is about being in action, individually or in pairs, while executing upon a real entrepreneurial opportunity. Building on the foundation from EPS 3501, in this course, students put Entrepreneurial Thought and Action into practice by developing, taking and building on key action steps to advance their own venture or on projects for existing enterprises. Key elements of the process involve both primary and secondary research while engaging prospective customers, experts, suppliers, stakeholders, analogous/complementary ventures, and investors. Students are challenged to test ideas and gain a clearer understanding of the interdisciplinary complexities involved within the entrepreneurial landscape. Course readings and cases will provide supplemental background. Core to the class experience is the question - how do you build and lead an enterprising new venture? Students will set milestones to move their venture forward, working with both external mentors and peer advisors. The core is action based learning which will result in pivoting your venture based on information gained in experimenting and testing assumptions. The course has multiple deliverables related to key actions and decisions in marketing, finance, customer service and operations. Students are expected to work independently as well as interdependently with other entrepreneurs in the course. Contact time for this course will be split between in-class sessions and out-of-class individual meetings with the instructor. Prerequisites: None This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Spring

4.00 credits

EPS4534 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND YOUR FAM BUSINESS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND YOUR FAM BUSINESS

**Students must be Juniors or Seniors to take this course** EPS4534: Entrepreneurship and your family business General Credit EPS4534, EPS4530 (formerly EPS3530), EPS4531, EPS4532 and EPS4533 are equivalent courses. Students can only take one of these courses. Entrepreneurship and your family business is about taking action and executing upon a real entrepreneurial opportunity within students family businesses. Students put Entrepreneurial Thought and Action into practice by acting on their ideas in order to advance a real opportunity for value creation within their family business. Key elements of the process involve both primary and secondary research through engaging family members, prospective customers, experts, suppliers, stakeholders, and investors. Students are challenged to test ideas and gain a clearer understanding of the complexities involved with mixing entrepreneurial efforts and family dynamics. Course readings and cases will provide supplemental background. Core to the class experience is the question - how do you build and lead a venture or entrepreneurial opportunity within a family business? Students will set milestones to move their idea forward, working with family members and peer advisors. The core is action based learning which will result in pivoting your idea based on information gained in experimenting and testing assumptions. The course has multiple deliverables related to key actions and decisions in marketing, finance, customer service and operations. Students are expected to work independently as well as interdependently with members of their own family and family business in the course. Contact time for this course will be split between in-class sessions and out-of-class individual meetings with the instructor. Prerequisite: No course pre-requisites. Students in their third and fourth year are encouraged to register for this course. Students in their first and second years need permission from the instructor. This course is typically offered in the following semester: Spring

4.00 credits