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Math and Science

The Course Catalog includes course descriptions of all courses offered by the Undergraduate School at Babson College. For descriptions of the courses offered in the current or upcoming semesters, please see the Course Listing.

Math and Science

AQM1000 - FOUNDATIONS OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS

FOUNDATIONS OF BUSINESS ANALYTICS

AQM1000: Foundations of Business Analytics
4 foundation liberal arts credits

The course introduces the necessary quantitative methods that are prerequisites to follow-on courses in AQM and in Babson's integrated core business offerings. Statistical software and the use of spreadsheets are integrated throughout so that students better appreciate the importance of using modern technological tools for effective model building and decision-making. The initial third of the course focuses on basic frequentist statistical methods, their conceptual underpinning, such as variability and uncertainty, and their use in the real world. Topics include data visualization, data collection, descriptive statistics, elementary probability rules and distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. The remainder of the course is dedicated to decision-making problems in a managerial context using algebraic, spreadsheet, graphical, and statistical models. Topics include introductions to linear regression, time series analysis, and simulation. The course emphasizes the effective communication of quantitative results through written, visual, and oral means

4 credits

AQM2000 - PREDICTIVE BUSINESS ANALYTIC

PREDICTIVE BUSINESS ANALYTIC

AQM2000: Predictive Business Analytics

This course introduces students to the foundational ideas of modern data science through a hands-on implementation in modern statistical software. Students will encounter key conceptual ideas like the importance of holdout data, the dangers of overfitting, and the most common performance indicators for various model types through a tour of popular and practical predictive analytics algorithms: linear regression, k-nearest neighbors, logistic regression, classification and regression trees, naive Bayes', and others. In addition to these supervised learning models, students will investigate unsupervised learning models like association rules and clustering, which are designed to uncover structure in data rather than predict a particular target. Throughout the course, students will practice communicating the results of their analyses to a variety of stakeholders.

Prerequisite: AQM1000

4 credits

ENV3600 - ARCTIC ECONOMICS:CLIMATE AND POLICY

ARCTIC ECONOMICS:CLIMATE AND POLICY

ENV3600: Arctic Economics: Climate and Policy 4 credit elective abroad This course focuses on the intersection between Arctic climate, Policy, and economics. The first part of the course will be taught as a team-taught course with faculty and students from Babson College, Brown University, and Nord University in Bodo, Norway. The first part of this course will last two and a half weeks and will be taught above the Arctic Circle in Bodo, Norway at Nord University and will require travel to above the Arctic Circle in Norway in January. While in Bodo, classes will be all day and will include travel to both an economic operation (possibly Bodo Oil Terminal) and an ocean ship travel to Svolvaer on the Lofoten Peninsula where we will stay overnight on the boat (above the Arctic Circle in the middle of January). The course will have extensive readings, and will cover issues related to Arctic climate, Arctic policy, and the effects of these on the economics of the Arctic, particularly as it relates to shipping. This integrated, multi-disciplinary course will be taught by natural sciences, social scientists, and economists and will cover a diverse and Arctic climate and environment; the peoples of the Arctic; the economics of marine services and transport; Arctic shipping trends, risks and management; Arctic ecosystems; Arctic natural resources and geopolitics and self-determination; environmental management, including metrics and assessment; Arctic rescue and preparedness management; and the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 6th Assessment Report. Students will be expect to put this all together working in teams of three (one from Babson, one from Brown, one from Nord) in a group project that is due while in Bodo

4 credits

NST1010 - NATURAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 1

NATURAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 1

NST1010 Astronomy 4 credits The evolution and structure of the universe are explained using underlying basic physical principles along with the historical development of our present understanding. We will explore the instruments and data collection techniques used by astronomers and learn how they can be applied to solve problems in other disciplines. Prerequisites: None

4 credits

NST1020 - ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT

NST1020 Energy and the Environment
4 credits

As the world's current energy demand continues to rise, it is critical to understand the causes, impacts, and possible solutions to our current global energy crisis. This course will focus on the technologies associated with renewable forms of energy and their potential for future success.

Prerequisites: None

4 credits

NST1030 - NATURAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 1

NATURAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 1

NST1030 Electronics 4 credit Foundation Liberal Arts Electronic devices transform the way people work and communicate. This course will focus on understanding the inner workings of those devices to provide a background on what they can and cannot do. We will also explore the impact of resource limitations on electronics, and how electronics can contribute to solving some resource issues. Prerequisites: None

4 credits

NST1040 - HUMAN BIOTECHNOLOGY

HUMAN BIOTECHNOLOGY

NST1040 Human Biotechnology 4 credit foundation liberal arts This course will provide you with a broad review of the basic scientific concepts, ethical considerations, and practical applications of biotechnology in our daily lives. We will discuss the regulations, technologies, and methods used by academic research laboratories, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries, and forensic scientists. Through this course, you will gain a number of different perspectives on personalized medicine, stem cells, drug discovery, development, and regulation, food, and the environment, all of which are directly connected to human health and well-being. By the end of this course, you will recognize the importance of biotechnology in the world today and see multiple scales of its application from molecular to global levels. You will be able to compare and contrast the positive and negative contributions biotechnology has made to our lives and you will grasp its strengths and limitations as we move forward into the middle of the 21st century.

4 credits

NST1060 - OCEANOGRAPHY

OCEANOGRAPHY

NST1060: Oceanography 4 credits Over 70% of the globe is covered by ocean. Marine systems are a nexus of life crucial sources of protein for human populations, reservoirs of minerals, and regulators of the global climate. However, human populations have increased demand for ocean resources in greater numbers than is ecologically sustainable. In addition, the ocean serves as a dumping ground for many types of waste, resulting in waters degraded by pollution. The objective of this course is to give you a basic understanding of the physical, biological, and chemical processes driving ocean fundamentals. In addition, we will examine how human demand on marine resources impacts ocean communities. This course will stress the importance of the scientific method both in principle and in practice. Extensive discussion of human environmental impacts on the ocean (e.g., climate change, marine pollution, overfishing) will enhance perspectives of self-awareness and ethical decision-making related to social, economic and environmental responsibility and sustainability (SEERS). Critical analysis is emphasized in class discussions, exam questions, lab reports, written assignments, and the group project. Assignments facilitate development of logical communication skills, appropriate use of graphs and tables, and organizing, synthesizing, evaluating and interpreting scientific information. Through lab and group activities, this course fosters team work and ability to work with others. International and multicultural perspectives are integral to the course, since the oceans influence on human populations is global, both directly on the coasts, and indirectly away from the coasts (via weather, climate, and seafood production). Prerequisites: None

4 credits

NST1070 - CLIMATE AND HUMAN HEALTH

CLIMATE AND HUMAN HEALTH

NST1070: Climate and Human Health 4 Credits This course investigates the interaction between the spheres of natural science and human health. Human activities impact the global climate and the resultant climate change impacts human health, both directly and indirectly. This course focuses on the background of various global health issues and their links to climate using the scientific method and multiple data-driven activities to evaluate research questions. We will also evaluate the integrity of scientific data, assessing reliable sources of information with respect to transparency and scientific bias. Specific topics covered in this course include the connections between global changes such as sea level and temperature rise with human impacts including increasing climate migration, spread of infectious disease, and threats to food security. We will also investigate connections between industrialized agricultural, fossil fuel use, and the deterioration of water and air quality. Finally, we address the prominent role of environmental racism in the human health and climate connection. In taking this course, students will gain a broader understanding about the long-term effects of their actions, both on themselves as individuals and on other global citizens, and recognize opportunities for individual and systemic changes that result in a more sustainable world. Prerequisites: None

4 credits

NST1080 - PARADIGMS OF SCIENTIFIC INVEST

PARADIGMS OF SCIENTIFIC INVEST

NST1080: Paradigms of Scientific Invest
4 foundations liberal arts credits

A multidisciplinary examination of the principles of scientific research and routes to discovery with examples from the history of the subject from its Greek beginnings to modern times. The course will provide insight into the sources, motivations, and methods of approach utilized by the developers of modern science. Topics from biology, physics, and engineering will be used to discover how we unravel the mysteries of the natural world and address the question of how do we know what we know is true by critically examining how the science community has resolved conflicting interpretations of the natural world and analyzing the consequent paradigm shifts from previously accepted theories. These concepts will be applied to addressing societal challenges in developing a national science policy, why things go wrong and mitigating man-made disasters. Finally, the real-world utility of these concepts is applied to applications within an entrepreneurship context in terms of evaluating and managing technology ventures.

Prerequisites: None

4 credits

NST1200 - AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

4 credits

NST1201 - AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

4 credits

NST1202 - AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

4 credits

NST1203 - AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

AP SCIENCE ELECTIVE

4 credits

NST2011 - SOCIOECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS AND DISASTER RES

SOCIOECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS AND DISASTER RES

NST2611: Socio-Ecological Systems and Disaster Resilience
4 advanced liberal arts credits

**NST2011/ECN2611:Socioecological Systems and Disaster Resilience will be co-taught by Prof. Winrich and Prof. Way as a single course.**

**These are two separate courses and students are held responsible to register for the course that they would like to receive credit for.**

Natural disasters can affect us wherever we go. Disasters might be localized or far-reaching, and may come from severe weather, seismic events, biological catastrophe, or outer space. Natural disasters may seem random, but their impact on people and their communities is not. While natural systems spark an event, like an earthquake, the "disaster" is often the result of economic, political and social systems. And in the case of climate change, the economic system itself may be the catalyst for ever-more-destructive natural forces such as hurricanes, floods and wildfires, potentially creating a negative feedback loop that leads toward more destructive events, both natural and man-made. This course looks at the rising number of natural disasters in the context of the economic systems that impact the environment and put communities in harms' way. It investigates the connections between humans and the environment when they are impacted by anticipated and unanticipated natural events, and how they plan for the future. It explores resilience planning for more survivable, sustainable communities in the face of disasters. It specifically looks at the role of economic systems and how these systems can either worsen or mitigate the severity of natural disasters themselves.

Prerequisites: AHS1000 and RHT1000 and RHT1001 and NST1

4 credits