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Operations and Information Management

The Course Catalog includes course descriptions of all courses offered by the Undergraduate School at Babson College. For descriptions of the courses offered in the current or upcoming semesters, please see the Course Listing.

Operations and Information Management

MIS3640 - PROBLEM SOLVING & SOFTWARE DESIGN

PROBLEM SOLVING & SOFTWARE DESIGN

MIS3640 Problem Solving & Software Design (Advanced Liberal Arts) Teaches students assorted techniques and strategies to identify, approach and solve problems in business and personal areas. Students learn how to write computer programs to offer efficient solutions for certain types of problems using a computer programming language of the instructor's choice (currently Python). Students complete a capstone project to demonstrate their learning, create something of value, and add to their personal portfolio. This course emphasizes hands-on computer skill development in a computer lab setting. The examples and problems used in this course are drawn from diverse areas such as text processing, webpage scraping, web development and data analytics. Prerequisites: (QTM1000) and (SME2012). Students are expected to be able to open command prompt window or terminal window, edit a text file, download and install software, and understand basic programming concepts.

4 credits

MIS3645 - AGILE METHODOLOGY

AGILE METHODOLOGY

MIS3645: Agile Methodology 4 credit advanced liberal arts Traditional methods for software development have failed in the current age. Software development today requires managing the development in the midst of unpredictable changes forcing development teams to be flexible, responsive, and non-sequential. This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the agile methodology. The course will introduce students to the different components the agile methodology starting with building a product backlog, tracking project progress, sprint planning, scrum and sprint execution, and ending with sprint retrospectives and backlog refinement In the process, the course emphasizes key scrum concepts such as the importance of empirical feedback, self-management of teams, as well as the need to deliver a high-quality product in each short iteration. While the course covers the methodology for building software (what to do to build), it will provide a brief overview of design-thinking (how to think about software), as well as overlap with project management (how to manage the process). Prerequisites: SME2012

4 credits

MIS3690 - WEB TECHNOLOGIES

WEB TECHNOLOGIES

MIS3690 Web Technologies Advanced Liberal Arts Elective 4 credits MIS3690 introduces students to web site development. Students will learn general design and programming skills that are needed for web site development. Students will explore languages and tools of the world wide web (WWW), including the hyper-text markup (HTML), cascading style sheet (CSS), and JavaScript languages. Some related design concepts are also discussed, in addition to aspects concerning design methodology and project management. As part of the course requirements, each student will publish a website to a hosting service, which charges a hosting service and domain registration fee of $20-30. (Students will be responsible to pay this fee separate from the tuition charges during the term.) The various tools may include FrontPage, text editors, and graphics design editors. This course emphasizes hands-on computer skill development in a computer lab setting. Prerequisite: SME2012 This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall, Spring and Summer

4 credits

MIS5650 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS CREDIT

INFORMATION SYSTEMS CREDIT

0 credits

MOB3501 - HEALTH SYSTEMS INNOVATION LAB

HEALTH SYSTEMS INNOVATION LAB

MOB3501: Health Systems Innovation Lab 4 advanced management credit Health Systems Innovation Lab is a learning-by-doing course where students work with health systems innovators and entrepreneurs to identify and solve problems related to the development and implementation of health innovations in the U.S. and abroad. Innovations may relate to care delivery, insurance, tech/biotech/pharma, or global health. Students will be assigned to a high priority project with an organization and will be expected to implement systems thinking and innovation development and implementation frameworks and techniques to address organizational challenges. The students will be expected to interact with the partner organizations regularly to make implementation progress. In addition to their on-site time, the course will have an in-class component. During each in-class session, the students will be exposed to health systems innovation concepts and how to implement it at their project. The students will also provide and receive feedback from their peers, instructors, and guest lecturers to gain insights on their project progress, thus better understanding their assigned problem and charting a path forward to success. Prereqisites: (FME1000 and FME1001) or (MOB1000 and MOB1010)

4 credits

MOB3503 - OPERATIONS FOR ENTREPRENEURS

OPERATIONS FOR ENTREPRENEURS

MOB3503 Operations for Entrepreneurs 4 credit - general credit This elective course will examine the real-world operational challenges and execution risks associated with getting a venture started and building a start-up operation from scratch. The class will include case-discussions, a semester-long project and guest speakers. The course will provide students with a set of practical frameworks, decision-making techniques and business management tools that can be used in developing their operational processes and managing their operational resources in a start-up. During each session, the students will be exposed to a different operations-related concept which they will apply to their own start-up venture or to the operation of an existing local start-up in the semester-long project. We will consider the operational challenges experienced by start-up ventures in a variety of industries. Case studies and class discussions will explore operations topics which are unique to start-ups including: Operational Business Models; Start-up Operation Metrics; How to Find a Supplier/Operations Partner; Product/Service Outsourcing Mistakes; Challenges in Achieving Product/Service Quality Control; How to select a Product/Service Distribution Channel; Managing Start-up Inventory; Challenges in meeting Product/Service Demand; Handling Market Uncertainty and Supply Uncertainty; Importance of Operational Flexibility; Bootstrapping Operational Costs; Operational Scalability. Local entrepreneurs will serve as frequent guest speakers who can provide real-world insights on their own operational challenges, failures and success as they developed their ventures. This course is an approved elective for the Operations management concentration. Prerequisites: (SME2001 and SME2002) or permission of the instructor.

4 credits

MOB3508 - FOUNDATIONS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT

FOUNDATIONS OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT

MOB3508: Foundations of Project Management 2 advanced management credits This course is an approved elective for the Operations Management concentration. Students taking this foundational course may not also register for MOB 3509, given course content overlap. According to the Project Management Institute (PMI), there are nearly 250,000 open project management jobs each year across seven project-intensive industries: business services, construction, finance and insurance, information services, manufacturing, oil and gas, and utilities. As more work becomes project-based, projects grow in complexity, and clients demand accountability and efficiency, graduates with project management skills will be in increasingly high demand. In this course, you will learn foundational skills for leading cross functional teams using up-to-date PM best practices, methodologies, and tools. This course is applicable across career paths such as consulting, information technology, entrepreneurship, new product development and many others. Students will be exposed to both the technical and behavioral skills required to effectively lead project teams -- whether as an official "Project Manager" or an unofficial leader temporarily charged with leading a project implementation. Foundations of Project Management focuses on what is often referred to as the traditional or "waterfall" approach to project management. Taught primarily via case study discussion, course content is consistent with PMP (Project Management Professional) certification principles. CIO magazine ranked the PMP as the top project management certification, as it demonstrates candidates have the specific skills and experience employers seek. This course satisfies 22 of the 23 educational hours required by PMI to apply for the junior-level PMP certification exam (known as the CAPM); the other hour was satisfied by the PM-related content in the SME prerequisites (below). Foundations of Project Management makes an attractive future pairing with the "Foundations of Agile" course offering. Prerequisites: SME2001 and SME2002 and SME2011 and SME2012

2 credits

MOB3509 - PROJECT MANAGEMENT

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

MOB3509 Project Management 4 credit - general credit According to the Project Management Institute (PMI), there are nearly 250,000 open project management jobs each year across seven project-intensive industries: business services, construction, finance and insurance, information services, manufacturing, oil and gas, and utilities. As more work becomes project-based, projects grow in complexity, and clients demand accountability and efficiency, graduates with project management skills will be in increasingly high demand. In this course, you will learn critical skills for leading cross functional teams using up-to-date PM best practices, methodologies, and tools. This course is applicable across career paths such as consulting, information technology, entrepreneurship, new product development and many others. Students will be exposed to both the technical and behavioral skills required to effectively lead project teams -- whether as an official "Project Manager" or an unofficial leader temporarily charged with leading a project implementation. The course will be taught primarily via case study discussion, with a significant "hands-on" component that includes the authoring of key project plan documents and a solid exposure to Microsoft Project. At the conclusion of this course, students will have satisfied PMI's educational requirements to apply for the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM) exam. This course is an approved elective for the Operations Management concentration. Prerequisites: (SME2001 and SME2002) and (SME2011 and SME2012) or permission of the instructor.

4 credits

MOB3517 - DESIGN THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING FOR BUSINESS IMPACT

DESIGN THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING FOR BUSINESS IMPACT

MOB 3517:Design Thinking and Problem Solving for Business Impact 4 advanced management credits The course enables students to work directly with Verizon, both on-site in Boston and virtually, on an action-learning project involving 5G and IoT (Internet of Things). For business, 5G technologies and IOT means new use cases on improving partner connections and products for the future. This will be an innovative course, which gives you the opportunity to work using the newest Design Thinking and Problem Solving skills for Verizon's newest markets. The course is designed around real time projects involving both customer centric and operational needs. Students will learn Design Thinking and Problem Solving skills that they can apply to any project. There will be a pitch competition with an award for first and second place projects. There is no prerequisite for this course. Prerequisites: none

4 credits

MOB3519 - SIMULATION MODELING IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

SIMULATION MODELING IN OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

MOB3519: Simulation Modeling in Operations Management 4 advanced management credits This course exposes students to simulation modeling techniques of various operational challenges. Simulations imitate realistic business environment and enable participants to explore the impact of their operational decisions. Decision making in simulation models enables decision makers to evaluate alternative decisions, before the changes are implemented in actual operations and prevents potentially costly mistakes. The real value of simulations is actually revealed after the decision is made, which is the critical component of this course. In this course, students will first identify a problem, collect or analyze the data, formulate and validate the simulation model, and finally simulate alternative outcomes to recommend the appropriate decision. Once the decision is implemented in the model, the future condition of the business environment are randomly changed, and impact of the decision is analyzed and re-assessed. The analysis will use simulation model to evaluate and predict impact of the decision making on profit, society and environment, combined with regulatory and ethical considerations. The course is composed of four independent simulation building modules, and a final project. Students will work in groups and individually to create four guided simulation models. Final project is a semester-long activity where students will have the opportunity to build simulation model in the field of their interest, or chose from a list of topics proposed by Babson community. During the semester, students will spend approximately equal amount of time on advanced data analytics and operations management topics. The underlying principle of the course is to learn by experience, learn practical model building skills, and emphasis on the analysis of the simulation results, and the impact of various decision alternatives. Prerequisites: SME2001 and SME2002 and SME2011 and SME2012

4 credits

MOB3522 - SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONS AND INNOVATION

SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONS AND INNOVATION

MOB3522: Sustainable Operations and Innovation (Previously titled LEADING AND MANAGING SUSTAINABILITY) 4 credits General Credit The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the concept of sustainability thinking and the practical process of sustainability-oriented innovations. Sustainability thinking challenges entrepreneurial leaders to enable the transition to a sustainable economic system, by identifying business opportunities and leading transformation of business culture. Students will learn about the systemic view of sustainability on how organizations can create social value while simultaneously delivering realistic economic returns: repurpose, stakeholder involvement, design & implementation of innovations and metrics development. Students will develop practical knowledge and skillset from design thinking and systems thinking as integral disciplines to manage human, financial, and other resources in innovations that transform businesses. Our goal is to provide the basis for a common language and understanding of the intersection between environmental/social issues and sustainability, innovation and entrepreneurship, business strategy, and organizational culture. Ultimately, students will develop their understanding of how to lead the transformation of a conventional business into a sustainable business. The course is composed of four parts. The first part will give students an overview of the sustainability thinking and allied strategy and the tools for designing the process through which it happens: what dimensions and questions might be considered to evaluate and guide sustainability. Having identified both the challenges and tools associated with sustainability, the second part will make the case for making a product or service sustainable. The third part will shift the discussion to making an organization sustainable and characteristics of sustainability leaders. Finally, the fourth part will reflect on making your life sustainable. Students will explore how to apply ideas from the course to a more sustainable way of living. Pre-requisite: SME2002 or SUS1201

4 credits

MOB3536 - SCALING LEAN VENTURES

SCALING LEAN VENTURES

MOB3536: Scaling Lean Ventures (Formally titled MIS3535: Lean for Social Innovation) 4 general credits How do you enable an organization to overcome the constraints and risks posed by the nascent & uncertain operating environment found in an entrepreneurial venture? Scaling Lean Ventures is a capstone course for Operations concentrators and elective course for others targeted to 3rd and 4th year undergraduate students with an interest in strategic operations in small to medium sized organizations. The approach to the course is driven by Lean Principles of Management including "learn by doing". The well-studied Toyota Production System serves us as the root file for many of these principles. Students will be assigned to a high priority project with an organization and will be expected to conceive & implement Lean Start-up principles to relieve the organization of a deeply embedded operating constraint on growth. This is not a consulting experience, but a learn-by-doing partnership for fourteen weeks. The students will be expected to be on site with the partner organizations regularly to make implementation progress. In addition to their on-site time, the course will have an in-class component. During each in-class session, the students will be exposed to a new TPS concept and discuss how to implement it at their project. The students will also provide and receive feedback from their peers, instructors, and guest lecturers to gain insights on their implementation attempts to-date, thus better understanding their assigned problem and charting a path forward to success. The partner organizations are from a wide variety of industries, including technology, consumer products, food, legal services, and socially-oriented manufacturing and service companies. Prerequisites: FME and SME ;Juniors and Seniors status

4 credits

MOB3573 - SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

MOB3573 Supply Chain Management Advanced Management Supply chain management (SCM) is an integrated approach to managing the flow of goods/services, information and financials from the raw materials to the consumer (throughout the supply chain) to satisfy customers' expectations and achieve profitability. Demand Chain management (DCM) takes a more customer focused approach to SCM. This course is designed to provide undergraduate students with an integrated perspective of SCM & DCM to develop the capability to analyze current supply chain operations, to reconfigure the structure of supply chain, and to develop competitive supply chains. Students will identify major barrier to effective supply and demand chain management, recognize best practices in supply and demand chain management, and assess the effect of advanced technologies on supply chain implementation. Prerequisites: SME2001 and SME2002

4 credits

MOB3578 - Product Design and Development

Product Design and Development

MOB 3578 Integrated Product Design General Credit You will work with industrial design students from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design (in Boston) and engineering students from Olin College of Engineering to develop new products through projects that are student-generated. Students learn first-hand about the techniques and contributions different disciplines bring to product design and practice collaboration common in professional design settings. This course provides valuable multidisciplinary preparation for students interested to work in innovation projects in established firms or develop and launch their own consumer products. Class will be held once a week and rotate between all three campuses. Babson students should enroll in MOB3578. Interested Wellesley students should cross-register in this course at Olin under ENGR3250. Prerequisites: (SME2001 and SME2002) and EPS4515 or EPS4527 or DES3600 Students must have completed ONE (1) of the following courses. Students who have completed a course from Olin College, from the prerequisite course list, must contact the Registrar for a Pre-Requisite Waiver. ENGR 2250 (Olin College) User-oriented Collaborative Design ENGR 1200 (Olin College) Design Nature ENGR 2199 (Olin College) Engineering for Humanity ENGR 3220 (Olin College) Human Factors and Interface Design

4 credits

MOB4573 - DESIGNING AND MANAGING SERVICES FOR GROWTH

DESIGNING AND MANAGING SERVICES FOR GROWTH

MOB4573: Designing and Managing Services for Growth 2 credits Service industries comprise the largest and fastest-growing segment of the U.S. economy and the economy of most developed countries. Moreover, many manufacturing companies are extending their operations to augment their goods production with value-added services. It is imperative for all managers to understand the unique features that are common to service organizations and to comprehend the idiosyncrasies that differentiate one type of service organization from another. This is an operations-based course that focuses on key issues involved with designing, delivering, and improving service operations. This intensive elective will utilize the First Service simulation as teaching vehicle to convey the complexity and interdependencies that exist in service industry. Prerequisites: FME and SME (except SME2041); Juniors and Seniors status

2 credits