Other

The Course Catalog includes course descriptions of all courses offered by the Undergraduate School at Babson College. For descriptions of the courses offered in the current or upcoming semesters, please see the Course Listing.

Other

ASM3300 - STRATEGIC PROBLEM SOLVING

STRATEGIC PROBLEM SOLVING

ASM3300 STRATEGIC PROBLEM SOLVING

4 Credits

This is the required advanced management course, which builds upon and requires students to apply the content of SME (Managerial Accounting, Technology and Operations Management, Marketing, IT Management, Finance and Micro-economics). The course develops skills in critical and integrative thinking with a focus on strategic problem solving. After introducing foundational concepts and frameworks of strategic management, the course will introduce issue-based problem solving. The latter part of the course requires students to work in teams and practice problem solving by identifying, analyzing, and proposing solutions to a strategic problem faced by a company of their choice. Students concentrating in strategic management are urged to take this course in the fall of their junior year.

Prerequisites: SME (except SME2041)

4 credits

ENV4610 - ART AND ECOLOGY

ART AND ECOLOGY

ENV4610 ART AND ECOLOGY IN THE ANTHROPOCENE
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits


This trans-disciplinary course is co-taught by an artist and an ecologist and will focus on integrating visual art practices and scientific methodologies as a means of observing, understanding, interpreting, and creatively responding to human driven disturbances and the restoration of nature. We will use art and science and the intersections between these disciplines to investigate the environment through: water, soils and clay, the movement of plants, and landscape ecology. Students will learn a range of contemporary artists whose work is dependent on and responsive to the natural environment. Students will also explore scientific processes for healthy ecological function and human-driven disturbance. Students will be challenged to visualize their scientific observations and creative responses through drawing, graphing, 2 D mixed media, mapping/modeling, and sculpture. It is understood that students will likely be entering the studio art practice at a beginning level, therefore prior art experience is not required.

Prerequisites: 2 intermediate liberal arts electives

4 credits

FME1000 - FOUNDATION OF MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP

FOUNDATION OF MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP

FME1000 FOUNDATION OF MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP, REVISED (2 semesters)
(FOUNDATION MGMT)


This full-year, introductory course exposes students to key entrepreneurship, marketing, business management and organizational behavior concepts. Central to the course is a _learn by doing" approach in which students teams develop and implement an actual business that the College funds. Profits generated by the business activity are used to support a charitable project that the students also coordinate. Through these activities students will have a personal opportunity to explore the challenges and complexities of creating social as well as economic value. In the organizational behavior stream of this section of FME, students will explore their personal entrepreneurial leadership capabilities and how to work with and through others and effectively participate in their business organizations. This section of FME will meet Babson's undergraduate requirements for a semester long course in organizational behavior.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall


Prerequisites: None

4 credits

FME1001 - FOUNDATION OF MANAGEMENT ENTREPRENEURSHIP

FOUNDATION OF MANAGEMENT ENTREPRENEURSHIP

FME1001 FOUNDATION MANAGEMENT & ENTREPRENEURSHIP (2 semesters)

4 Credits

This full-year, introductory course exposes students to key management and information systems principles, vocabulary, and techniques. Central to the course is a _learn by doing_ approach and sensitivity toward social responsibility and ethical behavior. Students organize into groups of 30 and are responsible for developing and implementing an actual business that the College funds. Profits generated by the business activity are used to support a charitable project that the students must coordinate as well. Students are introduced to the central concepts of finance, accounting, management, operations, and human resource management. In addition, they learn how information systems are used to manage and control business organizations and how to use productivity tools such as spreadsheet and database programs to manage business organizations more effectively.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring


Prerequisites: FME1000 and ACC1000 (may be taken concurrently)

4 credits

FYS1000 - FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

FYS1000 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

1 Credit


This course will challenge students to critically examine important aspects of college student life, such as engaging in scholarly dialogue, becoming a proactive learner, and valuing a diverse and inclusive environment. Students will also be asked to reflect on their own abilities and how they can make an impact on campus and beyond. Additionally, students will develop important relationships with fellow students, peer leaders, faculty, and administrators. Students will earn a grade and one academic credit for their successful participation in this program.

Participation in FYS is a graduation requirement for all Babson students.

1 credits

FYS1001 - FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

FYS1001 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

1 Credit


This course will challenge students to critically examine important aspects of college student life, such as engaging in scholarly dialogue, becoming a proactive learner, and valuing a diverse and inclusive environment. Students will also be asked to reflect on their own abilities and how they can make an impact on campus and beyond. Additionally, students will develop important relationships with fellow students, peer leaders, faculty, and administrators. Students will earn a grade and one academic credit for their successful participation in this program.

Participation in FYS is a graduation requirement for all Babson students.

1 credits

HSS2004 - MEGACITIES: GLOBALIZATION AND THE MANY SPACES OF DELHI

MEGACITIES: GLOBALIZATION AND THE MANY SPACES OF DELHI

HSS2004 MEGACITIES: GLOBALIZATION AND THE MANY SPACES OF DELHI

4 Credits

This portion of Babson,s BRIC course will be a three-credit intermediate liberal arts experience. The goal of this course is to analyze the idea of the megacity in the 21st century. The United Nations has described megacities as cities with a population over 10 million. Most megacities are in Asia and are hubs of global power. Using Delhi, Gurgaon, and Noida as our examples we will analyze the unique features of Indian cities and how the very different processes of urbanization and globalization impact businesses in India.


We will look at both the histories and current conditions of these three cities to understand how globalization, economic development/urban primacy, rural-urban connections, income inequalities, caste, communalism, and environmental concerns impact urban space and influence India's role in the global economy.

Prerequisites: Admission in to the BRIC program

4 credits

HSS2012 - SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL WATER SYSTEMS

SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL WATER SYSTEMS

HSS2012 SOCIO-ECOLOGICAL WATER SYSTEMS

4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits

Water is not only vital for all life on our planet, it is also intrinsically linked to all systems on which we rely as humans. Securing access to clean water for the growing global population is a defining challenge of the 21st century that is intensified by the climate crisis, pollution, unbalanced extraction rates, outdated infrastructure, and environmental injustice. Co-taught by an environmental scientist and governance analyst, this course will use a transdisciplinary approach to outline the diverse functions and uses of water in Socio-Ecological Systems (SES). Through a series of case studies, students will investigate how disruptions to the natural water cycle can lead to disruption of ecological, social, political, industrial, and economic networks. The cases will also highlight the ways in which structural injustice such as racism and socio-economic inequality pervade matters of access to clean water. In this course students will be taught system-thinking and will learn to identify and understand the interdependent/related components and feedbacks of dynamic water systems. Students will explore the concept of integrated sustainability to understand how social and political institutions are depended upon ecological integrity. The overall goal of this course is for students to develop the tools and thinking necessary to understand regional and global water challenges and to identify management solutions that are efficient, equitable, and sustainable.

Prerequisites: RHT1000 and RHT1001 and AHS1000 and NST10%%

4 credits

IMH2312 - HONORS SEMINAR II

HONORS SEMINAR II

IMH2512 HONORS SEMINAR II

This Seminar will meet every other week beginning 1/21

Honors Seminar II is designed to guide Honors Program students through the writing process for their honors project proposal. In this seminar students will identify a research topic, develop a research question, learn how to do a scholarly literature search and use research in their writing, and write a final, polished version of the honors project proposal. The course will be run as a workshop so attendance at all sessions and adherence to all deadlines is essential. This course is required for all junior Honors Program students.

Prerequisites: IMH2511, Instructor Permission

1 credits

IMH2511 - HONORS SEMINAR

HONORS SEMINAR

IMH2511 HONORS SEMINAR I

This section of the Honors Seminar will meet every other week beginning on 1/25

The first semester of the Honors Seminar is designed to accomplish three complementary goals. The seminar provides an opportunity for sophomore honors students to continue to build their community by meeting every other week to discuss an important issue from the perspectives of a number of different disciplines. These discussions will be led by various members of the Babson faculty and will include reference to some preliminary research done by students prior to the class. Secondly, the seminar will expose students to a wide variety of research methodologies and protocols in the contexts of these important issues, so students may become familiar with the processes they will undertake in completing their Honors Projects in their junior and senior years. Thirdly, students will meet a number of different members of the Babson faculty who may serve as important resources in future semesters.

The Honors Seminar is a requirement for all students in the Honors Program, will be graded, and carries one credit for the semester. A second Honors Seminar semester must be taken in either the fall or spring of the student,s junior year.

Prerequisites: Permission by: Instructor Permission

1 credits

IMH2512 - HONORS SEMINAR II

HONORS SEMINAR II

IMH2512 Honors Seminar II

This Seminar will meet every other week beginning 1/21

Honors Seminar II is designed to guide Honors Program students through the writing process for their honors project proposal. In this seminar students will identify a research topic, develop a research question, learn how to do a scholarly literature search and use research in their writing, and write a final, polished version of the honors project proposal. The course will be run as a workshop so attendance at all sessions and adherence to all deadlines is essential. This course is required for all junior Honors Program students.

Prerequisites: IMH2511, Instructor Permission

1 credits

IMH2612 - HONORS SEMINAR II

HONORS SEMINAR II

IMH2512 HONORS SEMINAR II

This Seminar will meet every other week beginning 1/21

Honors Seminar II is designed to guide Honors Program students through the writing process for their honors project proposal. In this seminar students will identify a research topic, develop a research question, learn how to do a scholarly literature search and use research in their writing, and write a final, polished version of the honors project proposal. The course will be run as a workshop so attendance at all sessions and adherence to all deadlines is essential. This course is required for all junior Honors Program students.

Prerequisites: IMH2511, Instructor Permission

1 credits

IND2503 - INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

IND2503 Independent Research

3 credits

IND3601 - INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

IND3601 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

Independent research is available for all academic divisions. Registration is manual for students through Registrar's office. Please contact your Class Dean for registration details.

Independent Research provides an opportunity to conduct in-depth research in areas of a student,s own specific interest. Students may undertake Independent Research for academic credit with the approval of a student-selected faculty advisor, the appropriate division chair, and the student's Class Dean. Please note that a student is responsible for recruiting a faculty advisor through his or her own initiative and for obtaining the advisor,s prior approval before applying for an independent research project. Authorization for such a project requires submission of a formal proposal written in accordance with standards set forth by the Undergraduate School.

Independent Research projects may carry 1,2,3 or 4 credits depending on the scope of the project as approved by the student's faculty advisor.

1 credits

IND3602 - INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

IND3602 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

Independent research is available for all academic divisions. Registration is manual for students through Registrar's office. Please contact your Class Dean for registration details.

Independent Research provides an opportunity to conduct in-depth research in areas of a student,s own specific interest. Students may undertake Independent Research for academic credit with the approval of a student-selected faculty advisor, the appropriate division chair, and the student's Class Dean. Please note that a student is responsible for recruiting a faculty advisor through his or her own initiative and for obtaining the advisor,s prior approval before applying for an independent research project. Authorization for such a project requires submission of a formal proposal written in accordance with standards set forth by the Undergraduate School.

Independent Research projects may carry 1,2,3 or 4 credits depending on the scope of the project as approved by the student's faculty advisor.

2 credits