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Resources for Families

Babson Partners Club

The Babson Partners Club is made up of students and their spouses/partners and children who have joined them for their MBA experience.

The Partners Club exists to help students, their spouses and their families get settled into your new home, meet new friends, and enjoy their time as part of the Babson Community.

The club is run by Babson partners and students and belongs to all members equally. If you would like to help or have ideas for future events please contact them at the email address below; new volunteers and ideas are always welcome.

Not yet a member? E-mail partnersclub@babson.edu to sign up or go to their website for more information.

Child Care

There are many options for child care and schooling in the United States. There are daycare centers, nursery schools, pre-schools, family/home daycares, nannies/au pairs, babysitters, and/or summer camps. If you are unfamiliar with these, we suggest that you investigate a variety of options so that you can find the one that you and your family are most comfortable with. 

Family/Home Day Care

Family or Home Daycare Centers are usually comprised of a provider and possibly an assistant who watch 1-6 children in their private home. They are licensed professionals whose homes have been specially set up for child care. Please check the yellow pages for home daycare providers in or around Wellesley. You can visit the provider’s home while they watch the children to see if you feel comfortable with them and their home. You should also ask for a list of references to call for further information about the provider. Usually you will set up a regular schedule, and will be required to pay for holidays and days your child is absent due to illness or vacation.

Child Care Centers/Nursery Schools

There are some excellent child care centers in the Boston area. They generally separate children by age into small groups of 5-14 children with 2-4 teachers in each room. Because the demand for this service is high and day care centers often have waiting lists, it is best to apply as early as possible.

A good source for information on child care in the Boston area is The Child Care Resource Center (http://ccrcinc.org, 617-547-9861).  Usually you will set up a regular schedule, and will be required to pay for holidays and days your child is absent due to illness or vacation.

Full-time Babson College students are given priority at the Wellesley Community Children’s Center (WCCC) at Wellesley College (http://wccc.wellesley.edu/) but the waiting list is quite long for the center and you must sign a 9 month or 12 month contract for your child. The WCCC offers tours in the summer and starts children in their programs on September 1st. The program runs to either September-June or September-August. Financial aid is available. The WCCC accepts children from age 3 months to 5 years.

Most child care centers will require medical and immunization reports prior to enrollment. Nursery schools generally offer smaller programs than child care centers, and are sometimes associated with or located in a church. If this is the case, you may wish to find out if religious subjects will be presented to the children.

 

Schools

Public Schools

The public school academic year runs from September to June. Public schools in the U.S. are tuition free and run from kindergarten (age 5) to 12th grade. Textbooks are provided at no charge. To register a child in kindergarten or the first grade, you must show the child’s birth certificate as in most cases, a child must be 6 years old by the first of September in order to enroll in first grade. For all grades, you must prove that you live in that school’s community. Children must also have a medical examination and will need proof of immunizations. For more information about school immunization requirements visit www.mass.gov/dph/imm

For detailed information about a town’s school system, go to the Massachusetts Department of Education’s site. The district for the area of Boston in which you live can give you further information, including which school your child should attend and local school bus routes.

Private Schools

Private schools generally serve children ages 5-18. They vary in size and may offer a traditional or non-traditional curriculum. There is a yearly tuition that varies according to the school. In most cases, applications should be made in the winter or spring preceding September enrollment.

 

Local Activities

The Wellesley Free Library has a children’s room and series of story times for kids of all ages. You can get a library card with your ID and your Babson card for borrowing books, videos and music. The monthly calendar of events for children is available at www.wellesleyfreelibrary.org/kids/index.asp

There’s a duck pond right on the corner of the Town Hall property across from the library. There are picnic tables and a short trail around the pond. Location: Corner of Wellesley Ave and Washington St.

There are many walking trails around the town of Wellesley. Find a map at http://wellesleyma.virtualtownhall.net/pages/wellesleyma_trails/trailmap.pdf

The Wellesley Recreation Building has a great playground with bathrooms in the building. In addition, they run a program called “tot time” a few mornings a week where you pay $5 to enter and play in a large, cheerful room full of toys and arts activities. Visit http://wellesleyma.virtualtownhall.net/Pages/WellesleyMA_Recreation - type in Youth Programs in the search .cleaned up

The Natick Community Organic Farm welcomes visitors to wander around, buy vegetables and look at the animals. It’s a small and friendly place with just a few staff and a community garden. They also offer a few preschool programs to introduce children to farm animals. Visit: www.natickfarm.org

The Marino Lookout Farm has a train ride you take through their large farm/orchard to pick apples, strawberries, pumpkins, etc. The area is really well organized for families. There’s even a play area and petting zoo half-way around the train loop. Visit: www.lookoutfarm.com

The Boston Children’s Museum is the oldest children’s museum in the country and is full of play/learning areas for kids of all ages. Visit: www.bostonkids.org

The New England Aquarium, a Duck Tour and the Museum of Science are also fun – though can be expensive. Check the Wellesley Free Library for free and discounted museum passes!

WarmLines Parent Resources connects parents in the area. Visit: www.warmlines.org

The Boston Parent’s Paper provides many ideas for classes, entertainment, schools, special events, where to buy children’s clothes or furniture, etc. Visit: boston.parenthood.com

Creative Movement of Arts Center provides classes of movement and gymnastics, art, music and enrichment for children aged 3 months and older. Visit http://centers.brighthorizons.com/cmac/.

Family Music Makers holds small weekly classes in song, dance and music. Children of mixed ages can attend. They also have a variety of free events! There are various locations, including one in Wellesley Hills. Visit: www.familymusicmakers.com/index.html. .
Gymboree is a professionally run series of activities for children offered throughout the Boston area. Visit: www.gymboreeclasses.com
 

The Sorenson Center for the Arts at Babson presents a diverse array of programming in theater, dance, music, film, video, and the literary arts. These activities are open to on-campus audiences and the general public. Visit: www.babson.edu/sorenson