OIM3517 Design Thinking and Problem Solving for Business Impact

(Formerly MOB3517)

4 Advanced Management Credits

Students who took this course as MOB3517 cannot register for this course

The course enables students to work directly with Wyman's, the number one Frozen Fruit brand in traditional bricks and mortar retail channels. In 2021, Wyman's will launch shop.wymans.com as well as an Amazon offering which allows consumers to order and receive frozen fruit delivered directly to your home. Students in this course will work on an action-learning project creating new technology initiatives for business impact at a brick and mortar business at the cross-roads of going digital. Specifically, students will be using Design Thinking and Problem solving skills to create and evaluate their Direct to Consumer revenue stream including future technology initiatives. The course content will include expanding student knowledge on product lines, pricing, delivery service options their go to market strategy as well as a financial assessment. Skills learned include tactical as well as strategic tools and processes. This innovative, action-learning course gives you the opportunity to work with a real, very successful company at the cross-roads of digital transformation using the newest Design Thinking and Problem Solving skills. There will be a pitch competition with an award for first and second place projects.

Prerequisites: FME1000 and FME1001 or EPS1000 and MOB1010

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: OIM3517
  • Number of Credits: 4

LTA2075 Design for Living
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
Explores how profoundly our lives are shaped by the designs of graphics we see, objects we use and buildings we move through every day. Students will gain increased understanding of the role good and bad design plays in affecting them and in shaping the world in which they live.

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2075
  • Number of Credits: 4

ACC7503 Designing a Business for Profitability
3 Elective CreditsIf you have taken and passed ACC7201, you cannot register for ACC7503, as these two courses are equivalent

This course is focused on the connection between strategy execution and profitability. Students develop skills in quantitatively grounded logical analysis in order to be able to:


- Judge the financial feasibility of plans for launching new businesses or for redesigning existing ones.
- Grow profitable and sustainable ventures.
- Create business models that make money.
- Integrate analytics and Industry 4.0 concepts to make business decisions.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Accounting and Law
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: ACC7503
  • Number of Credits: 3

SEN1201 Designing Presentations to Tell Powerful Stories(Senior Instructor: Amy Malinowski) It is approximated that there are more than 30 million PowerPoint presentations made each day. That is a lot of time and resources spent presenting-especially if much of that time is wasted on really awful presentations. To communicate effectively, you first have to identify the audience, then organize a coherent narrative, and finally create and deliver that narrative powerfully both orally and visually. This creative process is often something we make no time for but is crucial if we want to design a presentation that will really resonate. In this course, students will learn the process and technical skills needed to design truly great presentations

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1201
  • Number of Credits: 0

LVA2072 Detective Fiction, Noir, and Social Criticism
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This course explores the uses and genre development of detective fiction and film noir and their functions as social commentary, applying examples from different times and places - in the United States, Latin America, and Europe. What do these works have in common, and what separates them? How do they reflect or interrogate the cultures that produced them? Why has detective fiction (in its various incarnations) remained so popular? We consider revisions of the genre in the so-called "hardboiled" or serial "pulp fiction" of the 1930s and 1940s, as well as its representation in film noir. We analyze later versions of the genre through films such as Chinatown and Blade Runner, and recent alterations in neo-noir films, evaluating them in relation to contemporary culture. Short works by canonical Latin American authors such as Borges and García Márquez, among others, provide an introduction to Latin American crime fiction. Through the works of current and popular writers and filmmakers we consider the legacies of dictatorship in Spain and Latin America, and the genre's use in investigating and exposing a conflictive past (or fear of what one might find). We will look at the female detective in varied works. How is she different (if she is?) from her male counterparts? And we examine how detective fiction can function to parody or subvert the possibility of an ordered solution, or the completion of justice.


Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LVA2072
  • Number of Credits: 4

LTA2072 Detective Fiction, Noir, and Social Criticism
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This course explores the uses and genre development of detective fiction and film noir and their functions as social commentary, applying examples from different times and places - in the United States, Latin America, and Europe. What do these works have in common, and what separates them? How do they reflect or interrogate the cultures that produced them? Why has detective fiction (in its various incarnations) remained so popular? We consider revisions of the genre in the so-called "hardboiled" or serial "pulp fiction" of the 1930s and 1940s, as well as its representation in film noir. We analyze later versions of the genre through films such as Chinatown and Blade Runner, and recent alterations in neo-noir films, evaluating them in relation to contemporary culture. Short works by canonical Latin American authors such as Borges and García Márquez, among others, provide an introduction to Latin American crime fiction. Through the works of current and popular writers and filmmakers we consider the legacies of dictatorship in Spain and Latin America, and the genre's use in investigating and exposing a conflictive past (or fear of what one might find). We will look at the female detective in varied works. How is she different (if she is?) from her male counterparts? And we examine how detective fiction can function to parody or subvert the possibility of an ordered solution, or the completion of justice.


Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2072
  • Number of Credits: 4

MKT3502 Developing Effective Advertising

4 Advanced Management Credits

Developing Effective Advertising is an immersion in "creative thinking" in a "virtual" internship experience in a "virtual" best-of-breed advertising agency where students learn about developing effective advertising alongside some of the most talented and experienced advertising professionals in the industry. The "virtual" ad agency internship experience provides students with "real-world" learning in all aspects of current advertising and firsthand exposure to exciting career paths they may not otherwise encounter in a conventional advertising course.

Students learn about effective advertising by application of concepts, principles and fundamentals vis-à-vis lectures, readings, discussions, interactive exercises, case analysis, team projects and featured guest speakers from blue chip advertising agencies and media companies in the U.S., including Google, Cayenne Creative, MullenLowe U.S., NAIL Communications, Mediahub Worldwide, PHD Media, Wheelhouse Executive Recruiters and Babson College.

Students work together in 3 different assigned teams over the course of the semester and are assigned 3 team projects. Students also have individual assignments (readings, discussion board contributions and one mid-term paper) to complete. Methods of assessment is evenly balanced between individual and team assignments.

Prerequisites: MKT 2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MKT3502
  • Number of Credits: 4

MKT4530 Digital Analytics
4 Advanced Management Credits

The consumer buying journey continues to evolve, particularly as consumers become more comfortable and experience the benefits of using digital and mobile platforms to support all facets of the buying process. This rapidly expanding digital ecosystem generates an enormous amount of data. This course will explore how organizations can utilize the latest digital analytics techniques to turn structured and unstructured big data, into extremely valuable customer and marketing insights. This course is designed to complement Babson's Marketing Analytics course and covers entirely different topics and materials specifically focused within the digital sphere.

Students will utilize industry-leading digital analytics tools to collect and analyze consumer data to support decision-making and the development of marketing strategies that are informed by the insights. This includes the use of social media analytics platforms to listen to the voice of the customer, monitor consumer sentiment, and perform a comprehensive share of voice competitor analysis. Students will also use a web analytics platform to learn how to track, segment and measure the online and mobile device usage behaviors of customers and visitors. Students will also learn how to construct digital marketing experiments, perform A/B testing, and measure the ROI of digital campaigns. The course design includes official certifications in each of the digital analytics platforms used in the course.

Prerequisites: SME2011 or MKT2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MKT4530
  • Number of Credits: 4

MKT3515 Digital Marketing
4 General Elective Credits
This course is intended to prepare students to lead marketing initiatives in digital environments, where companies and professionals are transforming the way to provide value to consumers, and to develop mutually beneficial relationships with them. Lectures, readings, case discussions and project assignments will offer both an integrative management perspective and a comprehensive framework on digital marketing. The course will cover a wide spectrum of topics, including marketing strategic approaches on the Internet, e-CRM, e-marketing research, digital positioning and branding, managing social networks, integrated communications on digital media, new pricing approaches, digital competition, virtual merchandising, and e-commerce strategies. Upon completion of the course, students will have acquired competencies in designing marketing programmes that develop the innovative potential of online consumers and social networks.

Prerequisites: SME2011 or MKT2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MKT3515
  • Number of Credits: 4

MKT7542 Digital Marketing
3 Elective Credits
This course is designed to serve as both a survey and an applied approach to the field of digital marketing. In this course, we will approach digital marketing from three lenses: owned, paid, and earned media. Owned Media are the digital assets and brand image the firm manages (e.g., websites, social media, blogs, etc.). Paid Media are what the firm pays for to reach consumers using tools such as display ads, email marketing, and search marketing. Earned Media are what the firm gains through customer and community activity (e.g., e-word of mouth, communities, etc.) throughout the Internet. The course will present current trends and strategies on how to use and integrate these three media as well as build basic technical skills needed in the digital space (e.g., adwords advertising, SEO, etc.) Upon completion of the course, students will have an understanding of how to apply various marketing models and strategy to develop a strong digital presence using a variety of marketing content and digital tools. In addition to articles and book chapters to inform our thinking, we will also use case studies, professional certifications, and an online simulation to build a solid base in digital marketing.

Prerequisites: MKT7200 or MKT7800

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: MSBA Elective (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MKT7542
  • Number of Credits: 3