History and Society Division Faculty Profiles

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Kevin Bruyneel

  • Professor
Kevin Bruyneel is Professor of Politics at Babson College. His book, Settler Memory: The Disavowal of Indigeneity and the Politics of Race in the United States, published in the Critical Indigeneities Series of the University of North Carolina Press in 2021. He presently writes on the relationship between race, colonialism, collective memory, and racial capitalism. He has published articles in History & Memory, Settler Colonial Studies, Native American and Indigenous Studies Journal, and The Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy. His first book was The Third Space of Sovereignty: The Postcolonial Politics of U.S.-Indigenous Relations. He is of settler ancestry, born and raised in Vancouver, British Columbia, the traditional territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh Nations. Bruyneel completed his B.A. at Simon Fraser University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. at the New School for Social Research in New York City. At Babson College, Bruyneel teaching courses in Political Theory, American Politics, Critical Race Studies, Indigenous Studies, and Radical Politics.
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V. Miranda Chase

  • Visiting Lecturer
Miranda Chase is an environmental governance scholar with a focus on the Amazon region. She has been working with indigenous and traditional communities in the Brazilian Amazon since 2011. Her research spans from dams, water resources and fisheries management, to social movements and policy analysis. She holds degrees in International Relations (BA), Integrated Water Management (MSc), and is now graduating with a PhD degree in Global Governance and Human Security at UMass Boston. She has taught courses on comparative politics, environmental politics, Latin American politics, and international development both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Her publications address issues of climate change, global environmental networks, and grassroots initiatives in the Amazon. She is a Smith Fellow with the Mercatus Center, where she studies environmental political economy.
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Amanda Daly Berman

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Stephen Deets

  • Professor
Stephen Deets is a Professor of Politics, teaching courses on international and comparative politics, ethnic conflict, and sustainability.

With a strong background in post-communist democratization, his research focuses on a variety of issues related to ethnic politics, particularly ideas of minority rights, institutional forms involved in minority rights protection and representation, and how ethnic politics can impact public policy. He has published on Hungarian nationality policies, elections in East Europe and Lebanon, and social services in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Lebanon. In addition, he has co-authored several articles on sustainability in management education.

Before receiving his Ph.D., he spent a decade at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. Responsible for cooperation with the East European academies, he organized projects on nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism, small business development and entrepreneurship, and a host of environmental issues.
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Maya Dworsky-Rocha

  • Adjunct Lecturer
Maya Dworsky-Rocha is from Israel, where she studies childhood, whiteness, and militarism in education. She received her BA in Anthropology from the University of Oregon and an MA in Comparative Humanities from Brandeis University. She is currently a doctoral candidate at Brandeis University's Anthropology Department, and a Fellow at the Schusterman Center for Israel Studies.
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Candace Famiglietti

  • Adjunct Lecturer
Candace Famiglietti is a scholar of global governance. Her research is positioned at the intersection of gender, consumption, and the environment, where she is particularly interested in the roles of various actors in implementing international environmental agreements - the private sector, NGOs, policymakers, indigenous peoples, and end-user communities. She is particularly interested in how discourses shape policy responses, consumer behavior, and environmental management on the ground in relation to the illegal trade of wildlife and waste.

In addition to her position as an adjunct lecturer at Babson, she is currently a PhD student in Global Governance and Human Security and a research associate at the Center for Governance and Sustainability (CGS) at UMass Boston. She received her BS in Finance in 2010 and MA in International Studies in 2011 from Oklahoma State University. Prior to a career in academia, she was a social entrepreneur focused on providing peace-based education in conflict-ridden areas around the world.
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Marjorie N. Feld

  • Professor
Marjorie N. Feld's teaching and research interests include U.S. social, labor, and gender history, along with the history of global human rights movements, food justice' and sustainability. She is a member of the Academic Advisory Councils of the Jewish Women's Archive and Jewish Voice for Peace.

Her first book, Lillian Wald: A Biography, published in 2008 by University of North Carolina Press, won the Saul Viener Book Prize of the American Jewish Historical Society, an award presented biannually to an "outstanding book in American Jewish History." At Babson, she received a Nan Langowitz Women Who Make a Difference award in 2009, the Martin Luther King Leadership Award in 2014, and the Babson Pride Award in 2017. From 2011-2015, she was the faculty director for Babson's Center for Women's Leadership. Her second book, Nations Divided:American Jews and the Struggle Over Apartheid, was published by Palgrave MacMillan in July 2014. In 2019-2020, Feld was a Goldstein-Goren Fellow in the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University. She is at work on her third research project, titled No Consensus: American Jewish Critics of Zionism.
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Nabaparna Ghosh

  • Associate Professor
Nabaparna Ghosh is a historian of modern South Asia. Her teaching and research interests focus on the multiple meanings of urban modernity, empire and colonialism, colonial and postcolonial cities, caste and urban space, and histories of environmental transformations.

Professor Ghosh's book, A Hygienic City-Nation: Space, Community, and Everyday Life in colonial Calcutta( Cambridge University Press, 2020) goes beyond town plans and maps to explore how caste and kinship ties configured urban space in South Asia, crafting areas of self-government within colonial town plans.

Professor Ghosh is currently working on her second book, which explores oral archives of the Sunderban delta. The book examines indigenous understandings of nature and human-non-human relations, as well as how these understandings clashed with colonial attempts to demarcate wilderness areas.

Professor Ghosh graduated from Presidency College, Kolkata, and received her Ph.D. from Princeton University, where she won the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies Dissertation Completion fellowship. She has taught at the University of Virginia and also worked as a Postdoctoral Fellow of History at The Cooper Union, New York, before joining Babson College.

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Mary Godwyn

  • Professor
Professor Godwyn teaches introductory and advanced courses in Sociology, Women's Studies, Gender Studies, and the Nature and Environment Foundation course. She has lectured at Harvard University and taught at Brandeis University and Lasell College, where she was also the Director of the Donahue Institute for Public Values. Professor Godwyn focuses on social theory as it applies to issues of inequality. Within the field of sociology, her areas of expertise include Critical and Classical theory, Feminist Theory, Ethics and Business Ethics, Diversity and Inclusion, and the Sociology of Entrepreneurship. She has published in journals such as Symbolic Interaction, Current Perspectives in Social Theory, Gender and Management, and the Journal of Small Business and Entrepreneurship. In 2008, her business ethics case, Hugh Connerty and Hooters: What is Successful Entrepreneurship? won the Dark Side Case Competition sponsored by the Critical Management Studies Interest Group and the Management Education Division of the Academy of Management. In 2012, Professor Godwyn was given the Nan Langowitz Women Who Make a Difference Award at Babson College, and in 2013, she was the recipient of the Women's Leadership Award, World Corporate Social Responsibility Congress in Mumbai, India. She has also published three books: Minority Women Entrepreneurs: How Outsider Status can Lead to Better Business Practices, coauthored with Donna Stoddard, DBA (Stanford University Press and Greenleaf Publishing, 2011), Sociology of Organizations: Structures and Relationships co-edited with Jody Hoffer Gittel, PhD (Sage Publications, Inc., 2012) and Ethics and Diversity in Business Management Education: A Sociological Study with International Scope (Springer-Verlag, 2015).
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Meg Hassey

  • Adjunct Lecturer
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Kandice Hauf

  • Associate Professor
  • Division Chair
Dr. Hauf has taught at Auburn University and at Wesleyan University in the areas of traditional and modern China. Dr. Hauf's thesis at Yale covered Ming-Quing China (1368-1911). A related minor field was Chinese intellectual history to 1279 A.D. She is a consultant on travel, life, and business in China, Japan, and Taiwan. Dr. Hauf is conversant in Japanese, German, Russian, French, classical and modern Chinese, and Serbo-Croatian.
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James Hoopes

  • Professor
  • Murata Professor of Ethics in Business
James Hoopes is "Murata Professor of Ethics in Business" at Babson College. His latest book is Corporate Dreams: Big Business in American Democracy from the Great Depression to the Great Recession. The author of half a dozen other books on American history, Hoopes has received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and other funding agencies. His paper, "Managing a Riot," won the Paul Hersey Award for the best paper on leadership at the 2000 meeting of the Academy of Management. He has taught in both Europe and Asia.
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Xinghua Li

  • Associate Professor
Xinghua Li is Associate Professor of Media Studies in the History & Society Division. At Babson College, she teaches courses on critical media theory, consumer culture, and environmental sustainability. Her research explores the global spread of consumer capitalism through the perspectives of ecocriticism, psychoanalysis, and critical media theory. Her book Environmental Advertising in China and the USA: The Desire to Go Green (Routledge 2016) uses advertising as a lens to analyze the rising phenomenon of green consumerism and compares how the Chinese and American consumer desires for green products are shaped by ideological, cultural, and historical differences.

Born and raised in Shanghai, China, Dr. Li received her Bachelor Degree in Advertising from Fudan University and finished her MA and PhD in Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. Dr. Li's previous works use psychoanalysis and poststructural theories to explore the relationship between media, desire, and the environment. She has published in journals such as Media, Culture and Society, Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, Environmental Communication: A Journal of Nature and Culture, the anthology Reading Brokeback Mountain, and for three years she authored the "Looking Abroad" Column for The 21st Century, an English-language weekly in Beijing affiliated with the China Daily News Group.

Dr. Li is also working on several other projects. One studies the Chinese tradition of consuming wildlife products such as ivory, rhino horns, and tiger bones and the NGO campaigns intending to stop it. Another examines the psycho-mechanism of eco-jokes in popular culture and explores the potential to increase environmental participation through comedy and humor. Another employs Freud's notion of the death drive to understand the relations between deadlines and systematized procrastination in modern capitalistic societies. Finally, one studies the digitization of the Chinese language through the computer keyboard and its impacts on literacy and the calligraphic tradition in China.

Dr. Li served as Chair of the Environmental Communication Division at the International Communication Association from 2018 to 2020, and is the Founding Member of the International Environmental Communication Association.
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Meghann Lucy

  • Adjunct Lecturer
Meghann is interested in consumption, excess, inequality, medical sociology, and how these intersect. More specifically, she studies the medicalization of excess consumption and accumulation patterns, that is, hoarding behaviors, and media representations of normative consumption. She is currently exploring the role of social positionality and stakeholder composition in how Boston defines, detects, and treats/sanctions hoarding behaviors. Other recent work focuses on the role of object divestment in social contexts of excess through content and narrative analyses of Tidying Up with Marie Kondo, the relationship between computer use for leisure and exercise, and the development of activist obituaries in West Virginia over the course of the opioid crisis.

In addition to her position as an adjunct lecturer at Babson, she is currently a PhD candidate in sociology at Boston University and an editor for Accounts, the newsletter of the Economic Sociology section of the American Sociology Association. She received her B.A. in Political Science from the University of Wyoming and M.A. in Liberal Studies: American Studies from The Graduate Center, CUNY. Prior to a career in academia, she worked as a contracts and fulfillment manager for the children's book publisher Scholastic and as a copyeditor and medical writer at the Cardiovascular Research Foundation.
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William Mayborn

  • Adjunct Lecturer
William C. Mayborn is a scholar of Political Science, specifically International Security and Chinese Politics. He teaches Global Politics, Comparative Politics, China Today, U.S. Foreign Policy, and International Politics of Asia. He is currently researching North Korea's political control over its citizens.
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Ellen Milimu

  • Adjunct Lecturer
Ellen Milimu teaches the course Africa Rising at Babson college. She has previously taught Sports and Global Affairs at University of Massachusetts Boston, Honors College. She is currently pursuing her PhD in Global Governance and Human Security, and her research interests include Global Sports, African Political Economy, Diplomacy, and Gender and Intersectionality. She received her B.A in journalism and M.A in Diplomacy from University of Nairobi.

Ellen is a co-founder of Simama Africa, a Community Based Organization in Kenya that uses sports for social change and community support. On her down time, she runs her sports media page on social media, Soccer Embassy. These activities influence her research on African sports that aims to understand contemporary social, political, and economic African societies against the background of different historical perspectives and current global political economy environment.

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Krystal-Gayle O'Neill

Krystal-Gayle O'Neill (She Series) is as an adjunct lecturer for global gender politics. In addition to being an adjunct lecturer she is also a PhD candidate in Global Governance and Human Security at UMass Boston and an Adam Smith and Dan Lavoie Fellow at the Mercatus Center, George Mason University. She received her BEd in Business and Computer Studies (2004) from the University of Technology, Jamaica, an MBA (2008) and MS (2012) from Nova Southeastern University, an MPhil (2016) from Wesleyan University and an MA in Conflict Resolution (2020) from UMass Boston.

She is a scholar in conflict resolution, human security, social and restorative justice. Her research is positioned at the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality, where she is particularly interested in postcolonial societies, international organizations and the governance of race, gender and sexuality around the globe. Her research interests include the decriminalization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LBGTQ) sexualities in the Anglophone Caribbean. Previously she has taught courses related to international relations, gender and human rights. Prior to a career in academia, she was a higher education administrator, working in residential life, student activities and campus recreation.
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Frederick Opie

  • Professor
Dr. Frederick Douglass Opie is a Babson Professor of History and Foodways, the author of articles, books, a food history blog, and the Producer/Host of the Fred Opie Show. Fred is also the Host/Producer of the Online Teaching Survival Guide: A 7-Part Audio Series. Fred's work examines history through the lens of food and he use history to positively impact the future. Fred's secret sauce his sharing the stupid tax he has paid so others can learn from his failures. For more visit his website @ FredOpie.com.
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Kristofer Petersen-Overton

  • Adjunct Lecturer
Kristofer J. Petersen-Overton is a scholar of political theory. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science in 2017 from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) and his scholarly work centers on atrocity, transgressive violence, and structural injustice. His writing has appeared in Contemporary Political Theory, Arab Studies Quarterly, The Guardian, Politics/Letters, and WarScapes, among others. He is a co-translator of a forthcoming book, Lex Icon (Ugly Duckling Press, 2022), by the Portuguese writer Salette Tavares and he is currently writing a book on the concept of atrocity in global political thought. He is a co-editor at Sputnik & Fizzle, a small press that publishes annotated lectures by artists, activists, and scholars. Kris lives in Cambridge, MA with his partner and daughter.
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Paul Schmitz

  • Associate Teaching Professor
Paul Schmitz received his Ph.D. in American and New England Studies from Boston University in 2006. He has been a member of the History and Society Division at Babson College since the fall of 2006 and has taught courses on the Modern American City, the History and Culture of American Business, and Immigration and Race. His research focuses on issues of ethnic identity within the Italian and immigrant communities of New York City. Prof. Schmitz has also taught in the Babson Undergraduate Semester in San Francisco Program and served as the BUS-SF Program's faculty director.
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Kristen Tzoc

  • Adjunct Lecturer
Kristen has degrees in Sociology from Lehigh University (BA, MA) and is a current doctoral student in Sociology. Her research interests center inequalities focused on health, higher education, and the labor market. One of her ongoing projects explores the effect of (un)met adolescent occupational goals on early adulthood mental health. In a second, she investigates college job fairs as an instantiation of stratification in inter-organizational relationships at the moment of entry into the labor market. She has teaching experience at Lehigh University, and the Community College of Allegheny County, where she won the Student Choice Award for Extraordinary Faculty.
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Rachel Wilson

  • Adjunct Lecturer
Rachel Wilson teaches Modern European History at Babson College. She has previously taught courses on Modern Europe, International Relations, as well as Museums and Memorialization at Boston University. She is currently pursuing her PhD in History. Her research interests include the lived experience of women in the German Democratic Republic specifically, and the relationship between gender, class, and dictatorship in 20th century Europe more broadly. She received her MA in History and Archival Studies from Claremont Graduate University in 2017 and her BA in History from Occidental College in 2015. Beyond academia, Rachel has extensive experience working in museums, digital humanities, and public history.
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