MBA7570 Science, Technology and the Enterprise -- Foundation

3 CreditsThis, the foundation course for the _Science, Technology, and the Enterprise_ MBA intensity track, is motivated by the increasing application of science and technology in many facets of business -- operations, processes, products, big data, and even management -- in enterprises of all types and regardless of scale, industry vertical, and commercial orientation. Shying away from the particulars of science and technology, the course addresses the distinctive perspectives, knowledge, competencies, and ethos critical to leading and managing science- and technology-intensive businesses and enterprises. The course is structured around four themes -- science and technology acquisition, development, and management; the enterprise and its ecosystem; plate techtonics, disruptive change, and enterprise transformation; and science/technology choice and human, social, and environmental consequence. Drawing on the disciplines of science and technology management, organizational development, strategy, public policy, and social change, the course uses contemporary topics and study materials for context. Student learning is reinforced by in-the-first-person visits by managers and leaders of science- and technology-intensive enterprises.

Prerequisites: Full-time MBA students should have completed all their core courses; part-time and Blended Learning students should have completed a majority of their core courses

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: MSBA Elective (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MBA7570
  • Number of Credits: 3

SCN3640 Science and Innovation
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
An examination of the concepts, principles and policies related to research and development activities with examples from the history of the subject from its Greek beginnings to modern times. Successful and failed R&D projects from multiple disciplines will be explored as a driving force for innovation. The complex relationships that the scientific and engineering enterprises have to the innovation process will be examined with respect society, industry, and political motivations.

Prerequisites: NST10%%

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Mathematics Analytics Science and Technology
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: SCN3640
  • Number of Credits: 4

FIN3520 Security Valuation
4 General Elective Credits
This course is designed for students interested in investment banking, fixed-income valuation or equity analysis. Students develop tools and techniques for the valuation of different securities. Topics covered include: bond pricing, bond duration, the term-structure of interest rates, financial statement analysis, equity valuation models, and firm valuation. A major focus of this class is the valuation of specific firms and securities using finance theory and applications.

Prerequisites: SME2021 or FIN2000

Recommended: ACC3502

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FIN3520
  • Number of Credits: 4

HSS2058 The Modern American City (HIS)
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
In this intermediate course, students will analyze how urban centers such as Boston, Chicago, New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles have served as catalysts for major developments in nineteenth and twentieth-century American history. The course will consider how these cities have spurred the nation's economy, politics, and culture, and have shaped American identity by welcoming millions of immigrants, artists, intellectuals, and bohemians. Selected subjects include Boston's institutions of culture, Chicago's factory system, the popular amusements of Coney Island, the architecture and music of _Jazz Age_ New York, the development of public housing, the counterculture in San Francisco, and the urban crisis in Los Angeles.


Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HSS2058
  • Number of Credits: 4

LIT4616 Shakespeare's Sex
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Shakespeare's works have long held a privileged position in the histories of sex, gender, and eroticism. In this course, we will consider how Shakespeare helps us "think sex" in its various bodily, psychological, political, textual, and historical dimensions. What counts as "sex" in Shakespeare's world(s)? What desires, relations, and practices are rendered perceptible-and/or imaginable-through his poetry and plays? Which categories, identities, and emotions mattered when Shakespeare and his contemporaries imagined sex and its meanings, and how do these align with, and diverge from, those which inform our present lives and erotic relations? To explore these and related questions, we will read four major plays and two works of poetry: Romeo & Juliet, Othello, As You Like It, Cymbeline, The Rape of Lucrece, and selections from The Sonnets. Drawn from across the Shakespearean canon, such works will allow us to consider how differences of genre and literary form shape erotic possibilities, as well as how issues of race, gender, status, religion, reputation, and ethnicity intersect with sexual meanings, both in that era and our own. To enhance our appreciation of these works and their erotic possibilities, we will routinely consider modern, cinematic adaptions of the plays we read, as well as select screen biographies (Shakespeare in Love, All Is True). Finally, we will attend to the curious case of Shakespeare's sex: not only what we know-and don't know-about the playwright's (sexual) biography, but why his erotic relations continue to arouse interest and speculation, some four hundred years after his death.

Prerequisites: Any combination of 2 ILA (HSS, LTA, CSP, LVA, CVA)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LIT4616
  • Number of Credits: 4

LIT4609 Shakespearean Bodies
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

What kinds of bodies are represented in Shakespeare? Which bodies "matter," to whom, and on what terms? How are embodied meanings forged and contested on the Shakespearean stage, and how are such meanings informed by differences of race, class, gender, sexuality, age, religion, and bodily ability? In this course, we will consider how Shakespeare helps us think about bodies in their various material, political, textual, and historical dimensions. To do so, we will read six major plays: Antony & Cleopatra, The Comedy of Errors, The Merchant of Venice, Pericles, Richard III, and Titus Andronicus. Drawn from across the Shakespearean canon, these works will allow us to consider how differences of genre enable and constrain certain kinds of bodily thinking, as well as how issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and violence intersect with bodily meanings, both in that era and our own. To enhance our appreciation of these works, we will routinely consider modern, cinematic adaptions of the plays we read, as well as relevant works of literary criticism. Throughout, we will discuss the relevance of these works to our understanding of bodies today; consider how modern conceptual categories can inform and inhibit our understanding of bodies past; and explore how stage drama, as a representational medium which privileges the performed body, allows us to think about the various processes through which human bodies assume cultural meanings.

Prerequisites: Any combination of 2 ILA (HSS, LTA, CSP, LVA, CVA)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LIT4609
  • Number of Credits: 4

OIM3519 Simulation Modeling in Operations Management
(Formerly MOB3519)
4 Advanced Management Credits

Students who took this as MOB3519 cannot register for this course

This course exposes students to simulation modeling techniques of various operational challenges. Simulations imitate realistic business environment and enable participants to explore the impact of their operational decisions. Decision making in simulation models enables decision makers to evaluate alternative decisions, before the changes are implemented in actual operations and prevents potentially costly mistakes. The real value of simulations is actually revealed after the decision is made, which is the critical component of this course.


In this course, students will first identify a problem, collect or analyze the data, formulate and validate the simulation model, and finally simulate alternative outcomes to recommend the appropriate decision. Once the decision is implemented in the model, the future condition of the business environment is randomly changed, and impact of the decision is analyzed and re-assessed. The analysis will use simulation model to evaluate and predict impact of the decision making on profit, society and environment, combined with regulatory and ethical considerations.


The course is composed of four independent simulation building modules, and a final project. Students will work in groups and individually to create four guided simulation models. Final project is a semester-long activity where students will have the opportunity to build simulation model in the field of their interest or chose from a list of topics proposed by Babson community. During the semester, students will spend approximately equal amount of time on advanced data analytics and operations management topics. The underlying principle of the course is to learn by experience, learn practical model building skills, and emphasis on the analysis of the simulation results, and the impact of various decision alternatives.

Prerequisites: (QTM1000 or AQM1000) and (SME2002 or OIM2001)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: OIM3519
  • Number of Credits: 4

SEN1340 Skill-Driven Portfolio Building

(Student Instructor: Maria Herwagen) Searching for jobs is difficult enough as it is, let alone trying to stand out among a sea of other applicants. Set yourself apart from wordy cover letters and organized resumes by including a portfolio! Whether you're looking for jobs or internships in Marketing, Tech, Data, Arts, or another field, a portfolio will help you showcase your skills to potential employers. In this course, we will cover the basics of portfolio ideation and building, including reader experience, curation, visual structure, and more. Students will devise their own digital portfolios using existing materials as well as come up with ideas for additional content. The class is designed to help students walk out with a usable portfolio. Note: this class will NOT cover financial stock portfolios.

Tuesdays 6:30 - 9:00 pm

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1340
  • Number of Credits: 0

Marketing is involved with the task of ethically marketing products and services in a global environment. In order to survive in the contemporary business world, organizations have to continually bring new ideas and products/services to the market - think creatively, act entrepreneurially and utilize analytical rigor. The Marketing stream of SME will examine how marketers can recognize and utilize changes in the political, economic, social, and technological environments to identify and target opportunities; how to develop and communicate value propositions; and how to develop successful marketing strategies. These strategies will emphasize market analysis and the Four Ps (product, pricing, place, and promotion). Students will also be introduced to the analytical tools and methods crucial to understanding the role of these variables in achieving marketing goals and reaching performance metrics. This stream will also explore issues associated with: social media, marketing research and marketing analytics, buying behavior, market segmentation, branding, retailing, value-based pricing, advertising, sales, and other marketing topics as they are applied to the management of marketing goods and services. Methods of instruction will include lecture, discussion, experiential (involvement) learning, integrative teaching, simulations, and case analysis. Methods of assessment will include: quizzes, presentations, exams and participation. The material and the various methods of instructions are guided by Babson's learning goals. The marketing stream of SME will primarily integrate with Managing Technology and Information Systems. There will be a joint social media related project and presentation.

*** Students may not take SME2000 and SME2010 concurrently***

MKT2011 Marketing
3 Intermediate Management Credits


The sophomore management experience MKT and IT module (SME) integrates two subject streams: Marketing (3 credits) and Managing Technology and Information Systems (3 credits). This module focuses on helping students develop an understanding of the marketplace and the role of informational data bases, marketing research and marketing analytics in adding this understanding. The two streams highlight the role of marketing and information technology interface in a variety of contexts to enhance the effectiveness of business strategies. Businesses are actively using social media, mobile and online to market their products and services. The two streams will jointly highlight the importance of these information technology advancements in enabling businesses (and marketers) to better serve their customers. SME will also provide learning experiences that demonstrate the interconnections between the streams.

SME2012 Managing Information Technology and Systems
3 Intermediate Management Credits


Managing Information Technology and Systems (MITS), part of the second year management curriculum, is designed to introduce students to the foundational concepts in Information Technology and Systems (ITS) and their application in managing innovation, ITS infrastructure, and organizational partners (suppliers/customers) in the context of a medium/large business. The course will integrate primarily with Marketing and Operations using common/linked cases and joint exercises. The pre-requisites for the course is FME (Foundation of Management and Entrepreneurship).

Prerequisites: FME1001 or (MOB1000 and MOB1010)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Intermediate Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: SME2010
  • Number of Credits: 6

The sophomore management experience MAC and TOM module (SME) integrates two subject streams: Technology and Operations Management (3 credits) and Managerial Accounting (3 credits). This module focuses on the internal organization and processes required for entrepreneurial leaders and managers to successfully test and execute business strategies. To be effective, entrepreneurs and managers must design operations, model the expected performance of operational designs, make decisions that strategically manage costs, and take actions that achieve desired results in an ethical manner. The two streams in this module will help build the skills you need to become ethical entrepreneurial leaders and managers. You will experience how the design of operations impacts measured performance, and how modeling expected results before action is taken leads to improved operational decisions. SME will also provide learning experiences that demonstrate the interconnections between the streams.

***Students may not take SME2000 and SME2010 concurrently***

SME2001 Managerial Accounting
3 Intermediate Management Credits


The Managerial Accounting stream in SME builds on knowledge acquired in Financial Accounting but shifts the focus to providing entrepreneurs and managers with relevant information that supports decision making and performance measurement. The stream introduces the language of managerial accounting and teaches students to perform basic management accounting analyses (e.g., costing of cost objects, cost behavior, differential analysis, and performance measurement). The stream requires students to use the results of their analysis to evaluate the design of operations, to make strategic decisions, and to propose action. Issues covered include selecting a profitable mix of products and services, analyzing profits and costs during product development, budgeting for operations, analyzing whether to outsource or insource activities, and managing performance through measurement systems. Throughout the semester we will explore interconnections between management accounting analyses and operational actions.

SME2002 Managing Operations
3 Intermediate Management Credits


Managing operations is vital to every type of organization, for it is only through effective and efficient utilization of resources that an organization can be successful in the long run. This is especially true today, when we see that significant competitive advantages accrue to those firms that manage their operations effectively. We define operations in the broadest sense, not confining the focus within a set of walls but defining the scope to the thoughts and activities necessary to supply goods and services from their conception to their consumption. This course introduces you to the operational challenges that entrepreneurs and managers face and provides a set of tools to aid you in designing, evaluating and managing business processes to meet your organization's objectives. Throughout the semester we will explore interconnections between operational actions and management accounting analyses.

Prerequisites: ACC1000 and FME1001 or (MOB1000 and MOB1010)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Intermediate Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: SME2000
  • Number of Credits: 6