Accounting and Law Undergraduate Courses

Undergraduate

ACC1000 - INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

ACC1000 INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
FOUNDATION MANAGEMENT

4 Credits

ACC1000 will provide you with an introduction to the construction, analysis and forecasting of financial statements. These financial statements consist of the income statement, the balance sheet and the statement of cash flows as well as the associated explanatory statement footnotes. Using actual entrepreneurial companies as well as publicly traded companies you will learn how to prepare, analyze, interpret and forecast financial statements. By the conclusion of the course, you will be able to forecast and analyze financial statements for investment decisions as well as to model and analyze the financial effects of different strategic directions as an owner of the company. These skills will benefit you in whatever career path you choose.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Spring

4 credits

ACC3500 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I

ACC3500 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
4 General Credits


Students who have taken ACC3502 are not permitted to take ACC3500 or ACC3501

Broadens the base of financial accounting concepts introduced in ACC1000 and delves more deeply into accounting concepts, techniques and procedures. Topics include inventory, tangible and intangible assets, statement of cash flows, accounting changes, revenue recognition and current and long-term debt. This course is essential for those who plan a career in accounting and recommended for anyone whose career will involve the extensive use of financial statements.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall


Prerequisites: ACC1000

4 credits

ACC3501 - INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II

ACC3501 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
4 General Credits


Students who have taken ACC3502 are not permitted to take ACC3500 or ACC3501

This course extends the in-depth study of accounting concepts and techniques which began in Intermediate Accounting I. Topics include earnings per share, leases, pensions and investments.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring


Prerequisites: ACC3500

4 credits

ACC3502 - FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ANALYSIS

FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ANALYSIS

ACC3502 FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ANALYSIS
(FORMERLY INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING FOR FINANCE)
4 General Credits


Students who have taken ACC3500 and/or ACC3501 are not permitted to take ACC3502

This course is especially designed for finance majors who want to become more proficient in the financial accounting skills necessary to effectively read and interpret financial reports. The course is recommended for students interested in careers in financial management and Wall Street. Topics such as inventory, deferred taxes, inter-corporate investments, and pensions will be explored through study of accounting principles, transaction analysis, financial statement disclosure, and through financial statement analysis as it applies to corporate finance, credit analysis, and aspects of investment banking.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: SME2031 and SME2001

4 credits

ACC3546 - ACCOUNTING ANALYTICS

ACCOUNTING ANALYTICS

ACC3536 ACCOUNTING ANALYTICS
4 Advanced Management Credits


Students who have taken ACC3545 cannot take this course and vise versa

Data and analytics are being used to assist businesses in becoming more efficient and effective in their decision making process. This course will improve your ability to critically analyze data in order to make better business decisions and to communicate this information effectively to your audience. Students will learn how to use analytics tools from the lens of a manager, a financial statement user, a tax analyst, an auditor, and a forensic accountant. The course will introduce you to various analytics software products, and provide an opportunity to interact with professionals in the field.

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Class standing

4 credits

ACC4520 - AUDITING

AUDITING

ACC4520 AUDITING
4 General Credits


This course examines the interrelation of audit standards, procedures, and internal control techniques with the final auditor,s certificate; auditing techniques, statistical sampling methods, and the impact of electronic data processing (EDP) procedures on the auditor.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Summer I


Prerequisites: ACC3500

4 credits

ACC4530 - ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING

ACC4530 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING
4 General Credits


This course extends the in-depth study of accounting concepts and techniques which began in Intermediate Accounting I and II. Topics include business combinations and consolidation of financial statements, accounting for variable interest entities, translation and remeasurement of foreign currency-denominated financial statements and consolidation of foreign subsidiaries, governmental and not-for-profit accounting and accounting for partnerships.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring


Prerequisites: ACC3500 & ACC3501 as a pre-requisite or a co-requisite

4 credits

LAW1000 - BUSINESS LAW

BUSINESS LAW

LAW1000 BUSINESS LAW

Foundation Requirement

4 Credits

This course is an introduction to business law and the legal system. It teaches students to identify, analyze, handle and prevent legal issues which commonly recur in the business setting and to use law to create and capture value for businesses using knowledge of contracts, business organizations and intellectual property. The course surveys a number of additional business law topics, such as torts and crimes; product liability; agency and employment; consumer protection; and securities law.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Spring


Prerequisites: None

4 credits

LAW3560 - INTERNATIONAL LAW FOR BUSINESS

INTERNATIONAL LAW FOR BUSINESS

LAW3560 INTERNATIONAL LAW FOR BUSINESS
4 General Credits


This course explores the basic principals of law as they affect international business. Examines
the basic instruments and institutions of the international legal system and cultural underpinnings
of major world legal traditions, such as the European Union and the World Trade Organization.
Students learn how to structure and execute basic international commercial transactions in
goods, services, and technology, including the impact of import-export issues, contract issues,
and trade issues on business transactions. The course also examines the structure and regulation
of foreign direct investment, including strategic choices for business structures and the impact
of regulation on strategy. Finally, the course examines the ethical dimensions of corporate
conduct in a transnational setting. This course uses materials from many countries and
traditions, and makes extensive use of the World Wide Web.

Prerequisites: LAW1000

4 credits

LAW3573 - BUILDING CONTRACTS FOR NEW VENTURE

BUILDING CONTRACTS FOR NEW VENTURE

LAW3573 BUILDING CONTRACTS FOR NEW VENTURES
4 General Credits


Every business operates in a supply chain in which it buys and sells goods and services. The links to these suppliers and customers are formalized in contracts, which is why all managers should know something about how to read and write a contract. This course will teach you how to do that. We will review basic principles of contract law and apply them in a wide variety of transactions. The course will be writing intensive, and will equip you to do on the spot drafting and to understand drafts produced by your counterpart. This skill will enhance your ability to negotiate and structure deals. The foundation law course is a prerequisite, as is a solid ability to write.

Prerequisites: LAW1000

4 credits

LAW3601 - PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW AND WORLD ORDER

PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW AND WORLD ORDER

LAW3601 PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW AND WORLD ORDER
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Elective Credits


This course considers public international law as a way of framing and understanding the larger world in which we live. We will consider foreign relations and the United Nations system, the implications of global interdependence, and an increasingly robust international judicial system. Does international law actually create global order, or does it merely reflect political order that exists in other settings? When should national sovereignty yield to the wider concerns of the global community? What role do non-state actors (multinational businesses, NGOs, advocacy groups) play in the global legal regime?

These questions (and many others) have been at the center of the quest to create order in a rapidly changing world where the pace of technological innovation, entrepreneurship, and the increasingly free movement of people, capital, and ideas often far outpace the capacity of any legal regime (domestic or international) to keep up. We will study these issues and related themes throughout the semester. Special emphasis is placed on understanding international institutions, human rights (including the intersection of human rights with global business), refugee law, the regulation of warfare (including "humanitarian" intervention and responses to global terrorism), international environmental law, transnational dispute settlement, and business ethics in the global setting.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall


Prerequisites: Foundation Law course, (LAW1000)

4 credits

LAW3605 - PRIVACY LAW

PRIVACY LAW

LAW3605 PRIVACY LAW
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits


From the scandal surrounding Cambridge Analytica,s alleged use of personal data from Facebook
users, Edward Snowden,s whistleblowing about the NSA,s surveilling the lives of average citizens,
Google,s scanning email content to help marketers engage in target advertising, to police use of
DNA data on ancestry sites to track alleged criminals - we live in an age where privacy is in short
supply. Nevertheless, the U.S., and lately Europe more so, have laws that place a high value on the
privacy of their citizens. These laws try to strike a balance between honoring individual privacy, free
speech, and creating economic growth and innovation that comes from monetizing private data.
This course will explore privacy law, with a special focus on helping students cultivate the requisite
leadership skills to develop forward thinking company privacy policies, greater individual awareness
and empowerment over the use of their own data, and public policy. We will examine relevant
leading technological developments, the internet, US domestic and global privacy law, and the
cultural context in which these areas operate. Topics will include the US Constitution, free speech,
intimacy and privacy, racial and DNA profiling, health records privacy, copyright law, tort law,
wiretapping laws, anonymity, government records and public access, fair credit reporting, employer
monitoring of employees, student records privacy, and new European laws on data mining and
protection and cyber security. Note that this is also a writing intensive class, which will help
students develop and enhance their writing skills through various kinds of writing assignments.

Prerequisites: LAW1000

4 credits

LAW3615 - SPORTS LAW AND POLICY

SPORTS LAW AND POLICY

LAW3615 SPORTS LAW AND POLICY
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits


Sports Law provides students with a broad overview of how sports leagues and player conduct are regulated and how various bodies of substantive law, regulation and policy are applied in the context of the sports industry. The course examines the legal relationships among athletes, teams, leagues, governing bodies, sports facilities, licensees, broadcasters, and fans. This includes the history of the various leagues and organizations, the influence of politics on sports law, and public policy governing sports. Substantive legal topics covered include antitrust law, contract law, labor law, marketing law, and other regulatory schemes. In addition, this course will discuss other sports law topics, such as the role of the league commissioner; different league structures; agent certification; gaming law; and others.

Prerequisites: LAW1000

4 credits

SME2001 - MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING

The sophomore management experience MAC and TOM module (SME) integrates two subject streams: Technology and Operations Management (3 credits) and Managerial Accounting (3 credits). This module focuses on the internal organization and processes required for entrepreneurial leaders and managers to successfully test and execute business strategies. To be effective, entrepreneurs and managers must design operations, model the expected performance of operational designs, make decisions that strategically manage costs, and take actions that achieve desired results in an ethical manner. The two streams in this module will help build the skills you need to become ethical entrepreneurial leaders and managers. You will experience how the design of operations impacts measured performance, and how modeling expected results before action is taken leads to improved operational decisions. SME will also provide learning experiences that demonstrate the interconnections between the streams. SME2001 Managerial Accounting 3 credit intermediate management The Managerial Accounting stream in SME builds on knowledge acquired in Financial Accounting but shifts the focus to providing entrepreneurs and managers with relevant information that supports decision making and performance measurement. The stream introduces the language of managerial accounting and teaches students to perform basic management accounting analyses (e.g., costing of cost objects, cost behavior, differential analysis, and performance measurement). The stream requires students to use the results of their analysis to evaluate the design of operations, to make strategic decisions, and to propose action. Issues covered include selecting a profitable mix of products and services, analyzing profits and costs during product development, budgeting for operations, analyzing whether to outsource or insource activities, and managing performance through measurement systems. Throughout the semester we will explore interconnections between management accounting analyses and operational actions. Prerequisites: FME1001 and ACC1000

3 credits

TAX3500 - TAXES

TAXES

TAX3500 Taxes (General Credit) Studies tax administration; income, deductions, and credits; treatment of gains and losses; income taxation of individuals, businesses, estates, and trusts, with an emphasis on income taxation of individuals; and estate and gift taxation fundamentals. Prequisites: SME

4 credits