CSP2008 Cultural Anthropology

(Formerly CVA2008)
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
Introduction to Cultural Anthropology is a four credit intermediate History and Society course. The central focus of this course is the phenomenon of culture, that remarkable accomplishment that makes humans unique among all other species. We will use the concept of culture to investigate the question of what it means to be human. A major area of focus will be upon the ways cultural meanings are generated, shared, symbolized, ritualized, contested and altered in the face of different types of challenges. We will also study the relationship of cultural meaning to different economic, kinship and political systems. Throughout the course, as we study a variety of unfamiliar societies, we will continually refer back to our own societies with the goal of looking at our own ways of doing things with a new frame of mind. This frame of mind, or anthropological perspective, searches for the internal logics and constellations of values and beliefs that underpin all societies and subcultures. Central to this course is a succession of small fieldwork projects. This course will particularly strengthen your multicultural and rhetorical competencies

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: CSP2008
  • Number of Credits: 4

LTA2039 Curiosity in Literature
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
Curiosity contains within it a contradiction; it is our drive to know battling against our fear of the unknown, and it has played a major role in literature for a very long time. In this course, we will read texts that span several continents and centuries as we study curiosity and ask ourselves myriad questions. Why did the definition of curiosity change from negative to positive in the 14th century? Is curiosity hubristic tinkering or social responsibility? How is curiosity valued? Is the valuation of curiosity dependent on what is being sought? Is curiosity linked to gender? Who is rewarded for possessing it? Who is punished? If curiosity killed the cat, why? We will study Greek Myths and Fairy Tales as well as the following authors: John Milton, Christopher Marlowe, Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Sigmund Freud, Agatha Christie, Anne Sexton, and Patricia Highsmith. We will also view Alfred Hitchcock's film Vertigo.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring

Prerequisites: RHT and AHS

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2039
  • Number of Credits: 4

MKT3574 Customer Acquisition and Persuasion
(Formerly Managing the Sales Process)
4 Advanced Management Credits
Customer acquisition and retention is the driver of revenue and hence the lifeblood of every company. Therefore, organizations continuously seek people with strong persuasion skills. College graduates often become sales professionals, business development executives, customer relationship managers, or end up in positions that complement these roles. In addition, many entrepreneurs realize, often too late, the critical role of professional selling for the growth and survival of their nascent ventures. This course will equip students with the knowledge and skills to excel in professional selling, business development, and entrepreneurship.

Prerequisites: none

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MKT3574
  • Number of Credits: 4

MBA9502 Customer Acquisition and Persuasion
(Formerly Selling Ideas, Products and Services to Executives)

1.5 CreditsThe growth of business revenue depends directly on a firm's ability to create additional value for
current and potential customers. This course will focus on the professional selling process, to include identifying opportunities, gaining access to and engaging decision makers, asking high gain questions, building long term relationships with decision makers and influencers, presenting winning proposals, handling resistance and objections, completing the sale or obtaining commitments and following up. The course will use the value creation methodology to identify solution options aimed at creating value and enhancing the other party's (e.g., customers) competitiveness. The course will use a number of inputs to share current academic thinking and best practice. Course participants will also be challenged to apply the learning to potential opportunities. The art and science of ethically and effectively convincing another party about self, ideas, solutions, products, services, etc., is an imperative for everyone, whether in family or social settings, profit or not-for-profit ventures. It's a life skill. This course is therefore for everyone.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: MBA9502
  • Number of Credits: 1.5

OIM3620 Cybersecurity
(Formerly MIS3620 Computer and Network Security)
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

**Students who took this as MIS3620 cannot register for this course**

Teaches students the relevance of, purpose to and means behind establishing higher security levels for computers and associated networks. The nature of various security breaches including hacker attacks, email worms and computer viruses are explored. Management's responses including policy and procedure creation, risk management assessment and personnel training program design among others are examined. The tools of both security violators and protectors are explored. This course probes deeply into technical aspects of the hardware and software required to support computer networks. The course uses a combination of readings, case studies, class discussion and guest speakers for learning.

Prerequisites: (SME2012 or OIM2000) and (QTM1000 or AQM1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: OIM3620
  • Number of Credits: 4

OIM7556 Cybersecurity
(Formerly MIS7555)
1.5 Elective Credits

If you took and passed MIS7555, you cannot register for OIM7556, as these two courses are equivalent

The course is designed for the next generation managers who need to appreciate both the technical aspects and business impacts of cybersecurity in the enterprise. Different types of security break from a manager's perspective are explored. Students will also learn to design or support cybersecurity initiatives such as a risk management, policy creation, incident response and continuous improvement. The course uses a combination of readings and current events, class discussion and quest speakers for learning.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: MSBA Elective (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: OIM7556
  • Number of Credits: 1.5

QTM6110 Data Exploration (Quantitative Methods)

MSEL Course

1.5 CreditsData is valuable when it is used to make good decisions and avoid bad ones. We consider the value of data as a resource by studying how the variety of information available can be displayed, interpreted and communicated. Students will see the different approaches suggested by both traditional statistical methods and the recent advances in big data analytics. The course will emphasize the ways in which managers and entrepreneurs are both producers and consumers of data.

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Mathematics Analytics Science and Technology
  • Course Number: QTM6110
  • Number of Credits: 1.5

QTM7200 Data, Models and Decisions

2 CreditsData, Models and Decisions (DMD) - This course is concerned with identifying variation, measuring it, and managing it to make informed decisions. Topics include: numerical and graphical description of data, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, regression, decision analysis, and simulation. Applications to Economics, Finance, Marketing, and Operations illustrate the use of these quantitative tools in applied contexts. The course utilizes spreadsheet, statistical, and simulation software.

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Mathematics Analytics Science and Technology
  • Course Number: QTM7200
  • Number of Credits: 2

STR7509 Decisions, Decisions, Decisions - How Managers Make Good and Bad Choices
3 Credits
MBA students are exposed to a wide variety of concepts and tools which should enable them to make intelligent decisions. However, the decision-making performance of corporate managers, most of them trained in these concepts and tools, is very uneven.

This course will seek to enable a student to understand some key factors that can influence the quality of decision making. Using case examples from both business and government, the course will build on a basic understanding of analysis and decision making to expose participants to the circumstances that can limit the effectiveness of the techniques they have learned and help them understand the challenges they will face as members of leadership teams making complex choices throughout their careers. Students will also learn about the factors involved in providing information for decision-making, and the roles that information technology plays in decision situations.

At the conclusion of the course, students will have an appreciation for the factors they will encounter in leadership roles and the methods they can employ to ensure that they contribute to the making of good decisions. Their exposure to the broad topics presented should also acquaint them with areas which may draw their interest for more intensive study in specific academic disciplines.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Management
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: STR7509
  • Number of Credits: 3

HSS2025 Decolonization and Revolution in the 20th Century
4 Intermediate Credits
The 20th Century is viewed by most historians as the most violent and tempestuous century in human history. In particular, this narrative is largely dominated by the two great wars and the Cold War. However, what made those conflicts so important was not just their impact on Europe and the Western World, but how those conflicts catalyzed mass movements globally. This class examines the history of decolonization and revolution in the 20th Century, and how the world wars and the Cold War impacted processes of nationalism, independence, decolonization and revolution. Starting with the rise of Turkey and the Bolshevik revolution during the first world war, we will then analyze the independence movements that sprouted from the vestiges of the second world war, particularly those of China and India, as well as the emergence of Apartheid in South Africa. We will also explore the impact of the Cold War on revolution and decolonization, especially Vietnam and Algeria. Finally, the course will analyze how more recent revolutions, such as those in Iran and Israel /Palestine, are rooted in longer historical processes which highlight the continuing legacy of Imperialism and revolutionary resistance to imperialism in the contemporary world. The course will use a variety of books, articles, movies, and music to analyze this deep, violent, and often conflicted aspect of human history.

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HSS2025
  • Number of Credits: 4