MKT3501 Communicating for Consumer Behavior Change
4 Free Elective Credits
In this course, students learn and draw upon interdisciplinary theories in psychology, marketing and persuasion/influence to explore the nature of behavioral change at the individual, consumer and societal levels. Centered around a major social marketing project, students will test theories of persuasive communication and choice architecture to explore how to use the knowledge of human experience to shape behavior for social good.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MKT3501
  • Number of Credits: 4

MOB7523 Communication in a Global Context
3 Elective Credits
In today's competitive, global environment, effective communication is at the core of business success.

This course assumes that our abilities to think strategically and to communicate powerfully in the global marketplace are profoundly influenced by culture, gender, ethnicity, and technology. We'll examine the knowledge, mindfulness, and behaviors that lead to more successful business engagements with our clients. We'll then combine theory with action in order to discover and enact best practices in global business relationships.

This course does NOT prescribe protocols of behavior in different geographies. Instead, by increasing our own cultural awareness, we'll be in a position to observe, respect, and communicate in ways that lead to success. The key is to adapt to other contexts - but without sacrificing our own cultural identities and authenticity.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Management
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MOB7523
  • Number of Credits: 3

COM3504 Communicating in Global Virtual Teams
(Formerly MOB3504)
4 Advanced Management Credits
If you took and passed MOB3504, you cannot register for COM3504, as these two courses are equivalent

In this course, students will learn how to successfully engage, collaborate and communicate in global virtual teams. Students will begin by reading and discussing assigned course reading on global communication, virtual collaboration, organizational communication, and writing in groups in preparation for a major cross-institutional global project.

In collaboration with Marshall School of Business at USC, students will participate in the 6-week global Virtual Business Professional (VBP), project, which puts students in diverse international teams using Slack's communication platform to complete a written social media assessment project for Google, Amazon, or Starbucks. At the conclusion of the project, faculty teaching in the program will choose the best report for each company. Google, Amazon, and Starbucks are partnering with the project and a representative from each company will pick one of the three winners.

Students will be expected to hold virtual meetings, use project management tools, create online presentations, and write a final report using state-of-the-art technology used in today's corporate environment. The VBP project runs from approximately week 4 to week 9 of the academic semester. During this time, class work will include discussing experiences working in the project, identifying and considering shared challenges, and engaging with scholarly and popular reading that can help students in the project.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: COM3504
  • Number of Credits: 4

SEN1319 Communicating Business in a Tech Environment(Senior Instructor: Upasana Roy) This course focuses on using core business skills in a tech setting. Working in a technology-fueled environment, it is sometimes hard to communicate the value you can bring from a business sector. If you don't have proficiency in coding or computer science, it should not stop you from succeeding in a tech marketing or product management role. This course incorporates business analytics, design thinking, enterprise sales solutions and growth hacking. We will use presentation and data visualization skills to appeal to internal and external technically savvy stakeholders. Through guest speakers, simulations and articles we will explore the methods to create business value and communicate it in a high-functioning technology environment.

Course Schedule:
Class 1 - Wednesday, Jan 31
Class 2 - Wednesday, Feb 7
Class 3 - Wednesday, Feb 14
Class 4 - Wednesday, Feb 21
Class 5 - Wednesday, Feb 28
Class 6/Showcase - Wednesday, March 7

Senior-Led Seminars are free, non-credit courses that are taught by seniors at Babson. Upon successful completion of a seminar, students will receive a grade of non-credit pass (NCP) and the course will appear on your transcript at the end of the semester. These courses are made possible by a generous gift of the Donald W. White, Sr. '50 Family.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1319
  • Number of Credits: 0

POL4645 Comparative Latin American Politics
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

Comparative politics is a core subfield of Political Science and International Relations. The study of comparative politics has a lively and engaging body of scholars who are dedicated to understanding the potentials and limitations of democracy. The field has developed many interesting areas of research focusing on the comparison of political systems, national institutions, gender rights, environmental issues, and economic development.

This is an advanced level course, focused on contemporary Latin American politics. The course begins with an introduction to theories and methods of comparative politics, and a brief overview of basic concepts in political science such as different forms of government, electoral systems, and democratic systems. The course then discusses six central themes in comparative politics in Latin America: Party Systems and Political Representation, Economic Development and Inequality, Environmental Policies, Gender Policies, Regional Migration, and Foreign Relations. In each of these six themes, we will use cases from various Latin American countries for an in-depth discussion.

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: POL4645
  • Number of Credits: 4

HSS2033 Comparative Politics
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
Comparative politics is a field that seeks to understand political dynamics within states and to understand a variety of political phenomena common in many countries. This course will use such cases as Britain, France, Russia, China, Iran, India, and Brazil to look at issues of nationalism, economic policies, institutional design, development, and social change. Comparative Politics is also characterized by a methodology that seeks to illuminate the reasons for similarities and differences across countries and provide some tools to think more critically about various political claims and proposals.

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HSS2033
  • Number of Credits: 4

OIM9530 Competing on Analytics
(Formerly MIS9530)
1.5 Intensive Elective Credits

If you took and passed MIS9530, you cannot register for OIM9530, as these two courses are equivalent

Meeting Dates TBD
Drop Deadline TBD

McKinsey Global Institute is predicting a shortage of over a million managers and analysts with the analytics know-how to make effective decisions. In this course, you will learn about some of the most important analytics-related trends, how enterprises and entire industries are being transformed by analytics, and how to build a competitive data strategy and team. We will also discuss various approaches and tools for analyzing structured and unstructured data.

To complement our strategy discussion, we will explore some popular business intelligence tools. You will have the opportunity to get "hands-on" with a few of these tools.

The highlight of this course will be an industry-specific team project employing concepts and best practices discussed in class.

Note (1): If you have professional analytics experience, please contact the professor in advance of registering to assure alignment with your interests and needs.


Note (2): You will need a reasonably current PC or Mac. Mac users will need to download an app from the Apple AppStore. Details will be provided in advance of class.

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Operations and Information Management
  • Level: MSF Elective (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: OIM9530
  • Number of Credits: 1.5

MBA7541 Conscious Capitalism: How Business can Heal our World
(Formerly Building and Leading Conscious Business)

3 CreditsBusiness-as-usual is no longer an option. It has led to rising income inequality, devastated ecosystems and widespread social unrest. We are at a turning point in how we think about the role and purpose of business in society, with both the Business Roundtable and the World Economic Forum recently issuing calls for Stakeholder Capitalism and purpose beyond profit. Led by the co-founder of the fast-growing global Conscious Capitalism movement (www.ConsciousCapitalism.org), this course immerses students in a new business philosophy that challenges business leaders to re-imagine why their organizations exist and to consciously create long-term value for all stakeholders, including society and the planet. Research shows that companies that embody the principles of Conscious Capitalism substantially outperform their peers financially over the long term, while simultaneously promoting intellectual, social, cultural, emotional, spiritual, physical and ecological well-being. Students will learn in depth how to implement the tenets of Conscious Capitalism: higher purpose, stakeholder orientation, conscious leadership and caring cultures. In addition to discovering their personal higher purpose, they will critically examine the evidence on the impact of practicing Conscious Capitalism on the tangible and intangible well-being of all stakeholders; develop an understanding of systems thinking as an essential discipline for the practice of Conscious Capitalism; learn how to transform a conventional business into a conscious business; and embark on a lifelong journey of personal transformation to become more conscious human beings and leaders. The course incorporates a blend of discussions, interactive exercises, guest speakers, personal mastery exercises and a group project that entails performing a Conscious Business Audit of a company.

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MBA7541
  • Number of Credits: 3

HUM4620 Constructing and Performing the Self
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
In Constructing and Performing the Self students will examine and attempt to answer the most fundamental of questions: Who am I? A question this significant cannot be adequately answered by any one approach, thus the course brings together two very different approaches to guide the investigation. Psychological studies of identity marshal the tools and methods of science to develop and test theories that describe and explain the self. Theater studies bring interpretative and aesthetic perspectives to represent and reveal identity. In this course, these two approaches will be purposely inter-mingled: the questions asked and the answers derived will be informed equally by psychology and theater. Students will see, on a daily basis, how each field informs, supports, and speaks to the other. While there are some class sessions and assignments explicitly grounded in only one field to build students' fluency, the major activities of the semester will require both.

Given how personally applicable both psychology and theater are, students' own sense of identity will be the central text in this course. Like Tom in The Glass Menagerie, students are both the main character in their own life stories and also the narrator of them. This course aims for true interdisciplinary integration, and students will be called upon to use and apply the theoretical work as they build and create an original solo performance about a key moment in their lives. Our hope is that by semester's end students will have taken a concrete step forward in understanding and articulating their sense of self and feel comfortable and confident in their ability to perform for a live, public audience.

Students are asked to alternate between four roles in this course: scholar, writer, actor, and critic.
- Scholars consume information in analytical ways and produce new knowledge that is deeply grounded in their foundational knowledge.
- Writers produce new works, both analytical and creative, that take a novel position and support it.
- Actors give life to both old and new characters, conveying their shifting objectives over time to impact an audience.
- Critics evaluate texts (in our case, performances) with a constructive, thoughtful, and respectful approach that brings new insights.
Some days students will only adopt one role, other students will be asked to oscillate between the
them.


Prerequisites: RHT/WRT and 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HUM4620
  • Number of Credits: 4

MKT7550 Consumer Behavior
3 Credits
In-depth analysis of factors that affect purchase decisions in the marketplace. Applies behavioral and social science concepts to the study of buyer behavior. Focuses on the use of knowledge of buyer behavior in marketing decisions. Emphasizes theory, application, and ultimate consumer and organizational buyer behavior. Special attention given to exploring and evaluating buyer behavior research, the role of models in explaining behavior, influence of buyer behavior on development of marketing programs, and issues of consumer protection as they affect marketing strategy.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Spring


Prerequisites: MKT7200 or MKT7800

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: MKT7550
  • Number of Credits: 3