MKT3510 Consumer Insights and Research
(Formerly Marketing Research)
4 General Credits
This course provides students with hands-on experience with marketing research and analysis. Marketing research is simply an organized way of developing and providing information for decision-making purposes. The quality of information depends on the care exercised at each step of the marketing research process. These steps include: problem definition, research design, data collection methods, questionnaire design, measurement, sampling, data analysis, data interpretation. The class will discuss key elements and issues in marketing research including sources of data, data collection techniques and analytical approaches for providing information to be used in managers' decision. The first part of the class will focus on research process and design. In this section students will learn how to formulate a research problem, determine a research design, evaluate methods for data collection and develop instruments for data collection. The second part of the class will focus on how to analyze the data and recommend the appropriate action to management.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring

Prerequisites: SME2011 or MKT2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MKT3510
  • Number of Credits: 4

MKT3550 Consumer Psychology and Shopper Marketing
(Formerly Consumer Behavior)
4 General Credits
This interdisciplinary course discusses how the consumer is the focus of the marketing system. Drawing on research from sociology, psychology, strategy and economics, this course focuses on the factors that shape consumer needs and influence buying behavior. The content of the course explores individual behavioral variables (needs, motives, perceptions, attitudes, personality, and learning) and group influences (social groups and culture) as they affect the consumer decision-making process. The objective of the course is to help students understand how to analyze marketing programs, especially the communications mix and market segmentation, to improve consumer satisfaction.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall, Spring, and first session Summer


Prerequisites: SME2011 or MKT2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Marketing
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MKT3550
  • Number of Credits: 4

HUM4640 Contagious Cultures: Narrative, Film, Society
(Formerly Literature and Film of Contagion)
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits

Wherever you live in the world, it is almost certain that your life has been affected if not profoundly transformed over the past two years. The experience of living through such a vast contagion prompted me to think not about illness (I think we're exhausted by that), but about the spreadability and transmission of all sorts of infectious content. In this course, we will look very little at narratives of actual physical contagions. Instead, we will study contagion-as-metaphor for the expansion of a wide range of ideas and movements that propagate, spread, go viral, catch on, etcetera. Through narrative and film, discussion and debate, we will consider such overt topics as humor, laughter, and fear, but also beliefs, environmental contagion, cheating, social media, scapegoating and cancel culture, hair and fashion styles, protest, hope, and happiness, among other possibilities. Why and how do we aspire to some concepts going "viral," while striving to contain others? How is the speed and profusion of transmission of things other than disease both a positive and a negative aspect of our contemporary world?

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HUM4640
  • Number of Credits: 4

ECN3650 Contemporary Economic Systems
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Elective Credits
At the heart of contemporary economic debates is the question: what role should government play in the economy? This course provides a framework for understanding the real world implications and outcomes of these debates in the context of economic theories, policies and systems. The course begins with an exploration of the major economic theories as they have emerged through time and the problems each theory has sought to address. The course explores the big ideas in economics from free markets to communism to managed markets, and covers the core debates surrounding the relevance of fiscal, monetary, trade and policy/regulatory policies. The course then uses several policy and country case studies to explore the application of these ideas to pressing issues such as structural unemployment, inequality, civil conflict, climate change and the impacts of trade, focusing as well on the potential role of businesses and entrepreneurs in addressing these issues. Emphasizing fact-based analysis in assessing the goals and outcomes of diverse policies, the course builds critical thinking skills and helps prepare students for leadership roles in a dynamic global business environment.

Prerequisites: (SME2031 or ECN2002) and ECN2000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Economics
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: ECN3650
  • Number of Credits: 4

LIT4605 Contemporary World Literature: The Writing of the Unreal
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Students who have taken VA2036 are not permitted to take LIT4605This course examines contemporary world literature through the specific prism of _the unreal_. Writers from Latin America, the Caribbean, East Asia, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East will be examined in their rich experiments with surrealism, anti-realism, and hyper-realism. Moreover, this course will explore the enigmatic conceptual territories of the dream, the nightmare, the fantasy, the illusion, the hallucination, the mirage, the vision, and the simulation as breakaway zones of the global literary imagination. To achieve this task, we will evaluate authors as diverse as Franz Kafka, Ghada Samman, Haruki Murakami, Clarice Lispector, Jose Saramago, Naguib Mahfouz, Kobo Abe, Juan Rulfo, Vi Khi Nao, and Reinaldo Arenas, interrogating their different approaches to the creation of phantasmatic, strange, and unknown spaces.

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LIT4605
  • Number of Credits: 4

EPS6601 Corporate Entrepreneurship

3 Credits (MSAEL Core)Corporations caught up in the web of commoditization and stagnation have come to realize that they need entrepreneurial capabilities to create new platforms of business that will be the promise of the future. Yet overall, these efforts have produced uneven success. Although entrepreneurs in organizations can benefit from the resources, experience, financial assets and networks of the large company, they are constrained by its bureaucratic practices. Recent evidence points to corporate leaders' renewed attention to developing management systems that work with, rather than against intrapreneurs. In this course we will examine various approaches companies have taken to build this organizational capability. We examine five different approaches and consider the shortcomings or each. We will build the rationale for why innovation must become an organizational function if a company truly wishes to compete for the Future. We focus at the organizational level rather than the individual project level, seeking insights about how organizations can institutionalize structures and processes for entrepreneurship, even within a dominant culture of operational excellence that, of necessity, pervades most large established firms.

Prerequisites: MOB6600 and EPS6600

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Entrepreneurship
  • Level: MSAEL (Grad)
  • Course Number: EPS6601
  • Number of Credits: 3

EPS7507 Corporate Entrepreneurship

3 Credits Corporations caught up in the web of commoditization and stagnation have come to realize that they need entrepreneurial capabilities to create new platforms of business that will be the promise of the future. Yet overall, these efforts have produced uneven success. Although entrepreneurs in organizations can benefit from the resources, experience, financial assets and networks of the large company, they are constrained by its bureaucratic practices. Recent evidence points to corporate leaders' renewed attention to developing management systems that work with, rather than against intrapreneurs. In this course we will examine various approaches companies have taken to build this organizational capability. We examine five different approaches and consider the shortcomings or each. We will build the rationale for why innovation must become an organizational function if a company truly wishes to compete for the Future. We focus at the organizational level rather than the individual project level, seeking insights about how organizations can institutionalize structures and processes for entrepreneurship, even within a dominant culture of operational excellence that, of necessity, pervades most large established firms.

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Entrepreneurship
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: EPS7507
  • Number of Credits: 3

FIN7516 Corporate Finance: Evaluating Opportunities
(Formerly Strategic Corporate Investment)
3 Elective Credits
If you have taken and passed FIN7506, you cannot register for FIN7516, as these two courses are equivalent

This course is designed for those interested in evaluating complex long-term strategic investment proposals and valuing firms and subsidiaries for merger and acquisition purposes. Building on the foundation of the finance core, it explores finance theory to identify pitfalls, common mistakes, and best practices in corporate valuation. It expands valuation skills by introducing the equity approach and the adjusted present value (APV) valuation method, the preferred approach when capital structure is changing over time(e.g. in private equity transactions). It also covers the identification and valuation of real options embedded in strategic initiatives.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Spring


Prerequisites: FIN7200 or FIN7800

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: MSF Core (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: FIN7516
  • Number of Credits: 3

FIN7511 Corporate Finance: Raising Capital

(Formerly Financing the Firm)

3 Elective Credits

This course is designed to help students develop analytical and communication tools and skills to build and present financing strategies and manage the right hand side of the balance sheet. It explores the theoretical and practical issues of capital structure design and considers firm financing alternatives, including equity, long-term debt, hybrid securities, leasing, securitization, project finance, and It also examines the processes through which securities are issued and capital is raised, such as angel financing, venture capital and private equity, and public offerings. The course also explores share repurchase, dividend policy, and risk management.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall and Spring

Prerequisites: FIN7200 or FIN7800

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: MSF Elective (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: FIN7511
  • Number of Credits: 3

FIN3515 Corporate Financial Management
4 General Elective Credits
This course is designed for students interested in corporate financial management. Its principal goals are to provide the concepts and techniques required to make long-term investment and financing decisions within the firm. At the end of the course, students will be able to make real asset investment decisions by valuing a proposed investment project or acquisition. Students will also be able to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the appropriateness of a firm's financing policy. Topics covered include alternative valuation methods, estimating cost of capital, real options, capital structure, and corporate payout policy.

Recommended: ACC3502

Prerequisites: SME2021 or FIN

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FIN3515
  • Number of Credits: 4