FIN3535 Financing and Valuing Sustainability
4 General Credits
This course will examine the intersection of sustainability, corporate social responsibility and socially responsible investing with the traditional theories and tools of finance. Students will learn to describe the sustainability landscape and then analyze sustainable technologies, strategies, and business models from the perspective of managers, entrepreneurs, and investors. Basic financial tools such as discounted cash flow, capital budgeting, capital structure, and risk/return will be used to evaluate the feasibility and financial implications of sustainable products and practices in a variety of industries and applications. Students will learn how to balance the needs of all stakeholders in organizations to create both financial and social value.

Prerequisites: SME2021 Finance

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FIN3535
  • Number of Credits: 4

EPS7510 Financing Your Entrepreneurial Business
(Formerly Entrepreneurial Finance)

3 CreditsFocuses on raising seed and growth capital from venture capital, business angels, investment banking, and commercial banking sources; and financial problems unique to the small- and medium-sized firm undergoing rapid growth. Examines actual proposals made to venture capital firms, particularly in terms of their financial viability. Course also examines financial management for entrepreneurs over the life of a business project. Includes financing start-ups, financial planning for the nonpublic smaller enterprise, going public, selling out, bankruptcy, sources of capital, and other related topics.


Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Entrepreneurship
  • Level: Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: EPS7510
  • Number of Credits: 3

FIN3502 FinTech
4 Advanced Management Credits

The financial services industry is changing rapidly with the emergence of financial technology (FinTech). This course is designed to introduce key financial technology and its applications in financial services. Students will develop a broad and solid understanding of the recent innovations in FinTech, and their benefits and limitations. Students will also have hands-on problem-solving experiences that are useful in the FinTech venture. Ultimately, this course aims to help students identify entrepreneurial opportunities in FinTech and equip them with relevant knowledge and skills. The course will use a mixture of lectures, hands-on programming, case studies, guest speakers, and group projects. This course emphasizes and builds on Entrepreneurial Thought & Action, and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the context of the financial services industry.

Learning objectives for this course:
- Understand key financial technology, including artificial intelligence (AI) & machine learning (ML) & natural language processing (NPL), blockchain & cryptocurrency, smart contract & ethereum. Develop relevant programing skills.
- Explore recent innovations in the financial services industry, including payment, credit, capital markets, insurance, SMB, and real estate.
- Assess the value creation of FinTech. Analyze the limitations and challenges of FinTech (e.g., inclusion, regulation)
- Identify entrepreneurial opportunities in the FinTech space. Propose a FinTech startup idea and develop a business plan.

Evaluation of undergraduate program learning goals:
- Collaboration: Students will work in teams to prepare for the final project report and presentation.
- Communication: The course will be highly interactive. Students need to actively participate in case studies and guest lectures. The final project will require students to pitch a startup idea both through a written report and a presentation. The quality of the written project and oral presentation will be used as a key evaluation criterion.
- Problem-Solving: Students will develop problem-solving skills through hands-on programming and assignments, case studies, and final projects. Students will be able to apply knowledge and skills learned from this course to identify real opportunities and challenges in the FinTech industry, propose new startup ideas, and develop business plans.

Prerequisites: SME2021

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FIN3502
  • Number of Credits: 4

FIN7532 FINTECH

3 Elective Credits

The financial services industry is changing rapidly with the emergence of financial technology (FinTech). This course is designed to introduce key financial technology and its applications in financial services. Students will develop a broad and solid understanding of the recent innovations in FinTech, and their benefits and limitations. Students will also have hands-on problem-solving experiences that are useful in the FinTech venture. Ultimately, this course aims to help students identify entrepreneurial opportunities in FinTech and equip them with relevant knowledge and skills. The course will use a mixture of lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and group projects. This course emphasizes and builds on Entrepreneurial Thought & Action, and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in the context of the financial services industry.

Prerequisite: None

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: MSBA Elective (Grad),MSF Elective (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: FIN7532
  • Number of Credits: 3

SEN1344: First Impressions: How to Present Your Best Self

Instructor: Nairi Enright 

Have you felt the pressure of having to make a first impression? Have you spent hours recounting your conversation with someone and wishing you could have presented yourself differently? If these two experiences resonate with you, this seminar will prove useful to you and help you gain invaluable skills for communicating with others for the first time. In this course, we will explore the qualities that make a strong first impression in a variety of settings, from interviews to networking events to casual social outings. We will use case studies based on real-life scenarios. Students will practice using effective conversation strategies and reflect on their own interactions in order to feel comfortable and confident as communicators. 

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1344
  • Number of Credits: 0

FYS1001 First Year Seminar

1 Credit


This course will challenge students to critically examine important aspects of college student life, such as engaging in scholarly dialogue, becoming a proactive learner, and valuing a diverse and inclusive environment. Students will also be asked to reflect on their own abilities and how they can make an impact on campus and beyond. Additionally, students will develop important relationships with fellow students, peer leaders, faculty, and administrators. Students will earn a grade and one academic credit for their successful participation in this program.

Participation in FYS is a graduation requirement for all Babson students.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Foundation Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FYS1001
  • Number of Credits: 1

FYS1000 First Year Seminar

1 Credit


This course will challenge students to critically examine important aspects of college student life, such as engaging in scholarly dialogue, becoming a proactive learner, and valuing a diverse and inclusive environment. Students will also be asked to reflect on their own abilities and how they can make an impact on campus and beyond. Additionally, students will develop important relationships with fellow students, peer leaders, faculty, and administrators. Students will earn a grade and one academic credit for their successful participation in this program.

Participation in FYS is a graduation requirement for all Babson students.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Level: Foundation Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FYS1000
  • Number of Credits: 1

FIN7513 Fixed Income (Formerly Fixed Income Portfolio Management)
3 Elective Credits
This advanced quantitative course is designed for students interested in fixed income portfolio management, as well as students interested in the sales and trading of fixed income securities and their related structured products. Topics covered include: (i) bond pricing and day count conventions; (ii) relative value and yield curve construction; (iii) duration, basis point value, and convexity; (iv) pricing and hedging of interest rate currency swaps; (v) Treasury bond futures, conversion factors, and the concepts of cheapest-to-deliver and implied repo; (vi) the repo (GC and special) market; (vii) credit risk and the pricing of high yield bonds and credit default swaps; and (viii) securitization, mortgage-backed securities, and collateralized mortgage obligations.

Prerequisites: FIN7200 OR FIN7800

  • Program: Graduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: MSF Core (Grad),Graduate Elective (Grad)
  • Course Number: FIN7513
  • Number of Credits: 3

FIN4535 Fixed Income and Structured Products

4 General CreditsThis advanced quantitative course is designed for students interested in the sales and trading of fixed income securities and their related structured products, as well as students interested in fixed income portfolio management. Topics covered include: (i) bond pricing and day count conventions; (ii) relative value and yield curve construction; (iii) duration and convexity; (iv) pricing and hedging of interest rate swaps; (v) Treasury bond futures, conversion factors, and the concepts of cheapest-to-deliver and implied repo; (vi) the repo (GC and special) market; (vii) credit risk and the pricing of high yield bonds and credit default swaps; and (viii) securitization, mortgage-backed securities, and collateralized mortgage obligations. Course enrollment will be limited to enable extensive in-class usage of Bloomberg and other Cutler Center resources.

Prerequisites: SME2021

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Finance
  • Level: Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Management (UGrad)
  • Course Number: FIN4535
  • Number of Credits: 4

CSP2090 Food and the African American Canon

(Formerly CVA2090)
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This 4 credit history and foodways course discusses food and space in restaurants, dining cars, street venders and wherever food is made and sold (by whom), and eaten (by whom) at the center. The course will include readings in James Weldon Johnson's The Autobiography of a Colored Man, Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, Zora Hurston's Their Eyes Where Watching God, John Washington's The Chaneysville Incident, Paule Marshall's classic essay From The Poets in the Kitchen, and Richard Wright's Man of All Work. Readings on segregated restaurants come from James Baldwin's Notes of a Native Son, and in No Name in the Street. A chapter on Ntzoake Shange's novel, Sassafrass, Cypress, and Indigo and her novel Liliane.


Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: CSP2090
  • Number of Credits: 4