SEN1322 The Psychology of Social Media(Senior Instructor: Dylan Goren) The average American now spends 2 hours a day on social media. How has this affected our minds and the way we think? Are we addicted or is this simply the future of how we communicate and interact? Explore these questions and more through the unique lens of modern psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy. This course unveils the behavioral techniques that social media exploits in order to quietly maximize the time and attention you give to it every day. As a class, we will evaluate social media as a persuasive technology and determine whether it is ultimately a useful tool or a toxic habit. Is 2 hours a day too much? Bring your mind to find out.

Course Schedule:
Class 1 - Wednesday, Jan 30
Class 2 - Wednesday, Feb 6
Class 3 - Wednesday, Feb 13
Class 4 - Wednesday, Feb 20
Class 5 - Wednesday, Feb 27
Class 6/Showcase - Wednesday, March 6

Senior-Led Seminars are free, non-credit courses that are taught by seniors at Babson. Upon successful completion of a seminar, students will receive a grade of non-credit pass (NCP) and the course will appear on your transcript at the end of the semester.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1322
  • Number of Credits: 0

MDS4600: The Rhetoric of Social Media

4 advanced liberal arts credits

Drawing upon the reading, writing, speaking, and research skills developed in the Liberal Arts and Sciences Foundation and Intermediate Courses, in this intensive seminar students will turn a rhetorical eye towards the ever-evolving world of social media. While our personal uses of various social media platforms will be up for discussion, this course asks students to take a deeper look at the structures of power involved in everything from memes used to brighten someone's day to large campaigns and avenues for cultural and social change.

Through course readings, in-class discussion, and both primary and secondary research, students will critique the rhetorical functions and effectiveness of various issues in social media. We will review key terms from Babson's foundational writing courses (see especially: discourse communities, audience, conventions, ethics, circulation), deepen our understanding of how such terms developed, and make connections amongst what we're seeing around us today (think: from Aristotle to Ariana Grande).

In order to achieve a deeper understanding of the rhetoric of social media, this course will be split into four units: (1) Social Media Histories; (2) Social Media Discourse Communities; (3) Social Media and [Fake] News; and (4) and Social Media Futures. Each unit will challenge students both analytically and creatively.

Prerequisites: Any combination of 3 intermediate liberal arts (HSS, LTA, CSP)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: MDS4625
  • Number of Credits: 4

LTA2082 The Sexual Renaissance: Forms / Concepts / Cultures
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This course offers a bifold introduction to the studies of sex and literature in the English Renaissance. Reading a diverse range of literary and cultural texts, we will explore how writers imagined sex and its meanings, as well as how differences of language, genre, and literary form help to shape erotic possibilities, both in that era and our own. Ranging from pastoral poems to prose narratives, allegorical dramas to personal essays, metaphysical conceits to English and Italian pornography, we will encounter not only a variety of representational forms but of erotic arrangements, scenarios, practices, and fantasies. Situating these works in their own historical and cultural contexts, we will examine the "sexual Renaissance" on its own terms; consider how modern conceptual categories may inform-and inhibit-our capacity to understand the sexual past; and, throughout, discuss the relevance of these works to our understanding of sex today. Readings will focus on primary texts. Assignments will include weekly written responses and quizzes, a group presentation, an exam, and a creative final project. Interested students will allowed to compose short essays in lieu of the exams. No prior experience or knowledge is necessary to enroll.

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2082
  • Number of Credits: 4

LTA2090 The Short Story
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
What gives a great short story its undeniable power? Some writers strive to make their stories pack a punch, while others create more reflective works, exploring interiors; in either approach, the impacts of a great story are both immediate and lasting.

In this course, you will read a range of forms, from early tales to modern experiments. You will compare the intentions and effects of short stories that create entire worlds and those that are more elliptical and fragmentary, though they hint at more. You will learn the formal elements of the short story, such as characterization and point-of-view, and also trace the development of literary theories, those critical lenses that will increase your understanding and enrich your appreciation. Reading writers from several continents - from the famous, like Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Alice Munro, to the lesser-known, like Lucia Berlin and Edward P. Jones - you will follow stories of a family murdered senselessly by the side of the road, a bishop languishing in his final illness, and many more; you will even encounter a talking cat who proves to be careless in spilling the family's secrets.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Spring

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2090
  • Number of Credits: 4

SEN1309 The T in LGBTQ: An Introduction to Transgender Studies

(Senior Instructor: Elizabeth Lin) This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to transgender studies. Introduction to Transgender Studies will be divided into three phases. First, the course will critically examine the interactive relationships between cultural/social institutions and individuals based on an understanding of non-normative gender identities, gender expressions, and sexualities. This first phase will take a deep dive into the institutionalized oppression faced by the transgender community in federal and state documentation, medicine, housing, employment, and incarceration. Next, student will look into how race, sexuality, and disability intersect with and impact trans individuals' lived experiences. In the final phase, students will focus on developing an understanding of allyship and what it means to be an ally to the transgender community.

Course Schedule:
Class 1 - Wednesday, January 28
Class 2 - Wednesday, February 4
Class 3 - Wednesday, February 11
Class 4 - Wednesday, February 18
Class 5 - Wednesday, February 25
Class 6 - Senior Seminar Showcase: Tuesday evening, 3/3 or Friday afternoon, 3/6. Details to be confirmed by first day of class.

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Other
  • Course Number: SEN1309
  • Number of Credits: 0

EPS1210 The Ultimate Entrepreneurial Challenge
(Formerly EPS3510 and EPS3579)
4 Credits
This highly competitive course, patterned after the Donald Trump TV show, The Apprentice, involves intense TEAM competition and problem solving. Students will elect CEOs, negotiate to acquire team members and compete for ten weeks to determine the ultimate winner. We have designed a learning experience that will develop and test your skills in strategy, marketing, negotiation, management, finance -- as well as creative, innovative, entrepreneurial thinking. Your learning experiences will primarily engage you in real world business cases, including when feasible interactions with the entrepreneurs that are the subjects of the cases, or practitioners who have relevant experiences and insights to share.

Our goal is to make this course one of the most challenging and rewarding learning experience for you during your time at Babson.

This course is typically offered in the following semesters: Fall


Prerequisites: FME1001 or MOB1000

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Entrepreneurship
  • Level: Free Elective (UGrad)
  • Course Number: EPS1210
  • Number of Credits: 4

HSS2010 The US in the World in the 20th Century
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
This course explores the role of the United States throughout the world from 1900 to the present. We will investigate the people, institutions, and processes that influenced American diplomatic and military engagements, and analyze the impact and effectiveness of America's role. We will begin by exploring the emergence of America as an empire, and how American power and influence evolved and changed over the course of the century to the present day. We will explore America's role in shaping the Cold War, in particular in Latin American and the wars in Vietnam, as well as more recent engagements in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Africa.

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: History and Society
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: HSS2010
  • Number of Credits: 4

PRF1120 Theater Production Workshop
2 Free Elective Credits
This course will center on a major collaborative project undertaken jointly by all enrolled students (as well as some students involved in an extra-curricular capacity): the rehearsal and performance of a full-length play. In the professional theater world, every production is a considerable undertaking, requiring deep collaboration among a diverse ensemble, each bringing distinctive expertise to the project. Creating a theater production is not only a rigorous intellectual and aesthetic undertaking but also one that demands the development of leadership and collaboration skills. Whether you intend to pursue a career in the arts or not, the core skills developed through this experience will be highly relevant to any professional path.

Prerequisites: None

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Free Elective (UGrad)
  • Course Number: PRF1120
  • Number of Credits: 2

LTA2079 Theories of Love
4 Intermediate Liberal Arts Credits
What is love? Where does it come from, what does it ask of us, and how does it alter our minds, bodies, values, and relations? Are sex, friendship, and marriage necessary for love, or do they inhibit love's fullest expression? In this course, we will examine how influential writers have conceived and contested love's meanings across a range of cultural contexts. Focusing primarily on erotic love (erôs), we will consider how such meanings relate to notions of art, beauty, conjugality, legality, pleasure, sexuality, spirituality, and transgression, both in their original era and our own. Particular attention will be paid to differences of race, class, age, gender, and authority as incitements to, and/or impediments of, relations of love and eroticism.

Prerequisites: (FCI1000 or AHS1000) and (WRT1001or RHT1000)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Intermediate Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: LTA2079
  • Number of Credits: 4

THR4600 Contemporary Acting Techniques for the Stage: Building a Character
4 Advanced Liberal Arts Credits
Effective theatrical performance and communication begins with focused concentration, a free and active imagination, physical poise, and a controlled voice. In this course students will hone these skills as they read, analyze, and experiment with contemporary acting strategies and methods. Students' work on the stage will be guided and grounded by careful study and consideration of acting theory and history beginning with the work of Constantin Stanislavski and continuing with the methods of late 20th century and early 21st century practitioners and directors. By course's end students will not only have an understanding of the discipline and rigor required for successful performance but will also have a theoretical understanding and tools to create compelling and viable characters for the stage and for a public audience.

Prerequisites: 3 Intermediate liberal arts courses (CVA, LVA, HSS, CSP, LTA in any combination)

  • Program: Undergraduate
  • Division: Arts and Humanities
  • Level: Advanced Liberal Arts 4600 Requirement (UGrad),Advanced Elective (UGrad),Advanced Liberal Arts (UGrad)
  • Course Number: THR4600
  • Number of Credits: 4