Visual Arts

Visual Arts

Get immersed in the visual arts and design made available through BabsonARTS. Engage with both the artists and the art on display with exhibits showcased throughout the year. Babson, Olin, and Wellesley students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to take advantage of regularly offered workshops in ceramics, painting, and drawing and members of the Babson community are able to enjoy free or discounted access to exhibits and museums in the Greater Boston area.​​​​​

 

Excerpts
Installation by Naoe Suzuki

ARTIST TALK AND RECEPTION: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 5:00 P.M.
FREE with reservation
EXHIBIT ON VIEW September 12–November 1, M–F 9:00 A.M.–7:00 P.M.
Hollister Gallery

Naoe Suzuki presents excerpts from her Artist–in–Residence projects at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, a leading biomedical research institute. In this new iteration at Babson College, she will compose two pieces that use magic spells from the Edwin Smith Papyrus, the medical papyrus in ancient Egypt that included prognosis for the first time in recorded history. These pieces create rich dialogues, provoking and responding to each other, and offer viewers a deeper reading on topics such as medicine, progress, knowledge, belief, loss and discovery, and the cycle of exploration. Above all, they defy logic and resist singular reading on complex topics on science, progress, and history.

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Deindustrialization: Photographs by James Hunt

ARTIST TALK AND RECEPTION: Thursday, November 7, 5:00 P.M.
FREE with reservation 
EXHIBIT ON VIEW November 7–January 10, M–F 9:00 A.M.–7:00 P.M.
Hollister Gallery

Babson professor and photographer James Hunt has documented the once thriving textile mills that populated the Blackstone River Valley in central Massachusetts and Rhode Island. From Worcester to Providence, an average of one dam and one mill were built for every mile of river. For over 200 years, these mills were tended by hundreds of thousands of workers who processed millions of tons of textiles, generating vast wealth, for some, and vast pollution for the Blackstone, which was described as one of the most polluted rivers in the U.S. As work and money went elsewhere, the mills slowly emptied, monuments to economic cycles of boom and bust, now abandoned, burned, repurposed, or left waiting.

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